120

I have to display ratings and for that, I need increments as follows:

Input Rounded
1.0 1
1.1 1
1.2 1
1.3 1.5
1.4 1.5
1.5 1.5
1.6 1.5
1.7 1.5
1.8 2.0
1.9 2.0
2.0 2.0
2.1 2.0

and so on...

Is there a simple way to compute the required values?

1
  • "and so on..." does that include finite numbers close to the maximum representable value? Oct 10, 2018 at 13:35

10 Answers 10

234

Multiply your rating by 2, then round using Math.Round(rating, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero), then divide that value by 2.

Math.Round(value * 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) / 2

10
  • 4
    I dont need typing for dummies, I need typing for smarties
    – Neil N
    Aug 25, 2009 at 17:10
  • 5
    Not perfect! what about integer overflow! You can compute only half of the possible integers. Aug 25, 2009 at 18:18
  • 4
    Divide first, then multiply. This will eliminate the overflow problem, and also allow you to round to an arbitrary number.
    – Benjol
    Mar 28, 2013 at 7:57
  • 9
    @Benjol, dividing first and then rounding will cause it to round to the nearest factor of 2, rather than factor of one half. Not correct.
    – Nacht
    Jul 6, 2015 at 23:16
  • 3
    @ElazarLeibovich concerns of overflow can be side-step by using the number's fraction instead. var fraction = rating - Math.floor(rating), then round this fraction instead or the original number. Aug 13, 2020 at 0:21
76

Multiply by 2, round, then divide by 2

if you want nearest quarter, multiply by 4, divide by 4, etc

0
21

Here are a couple of methods I wrote that will always round up or down to any value.

public static Double RoundUpToNearest(Double passednumber, Double roundto)
{
    // 105.5 up to nearest 1 = 106
    // 105.5 up to nearest 10 = 110
    // 105.5 up to nearest 7 = 112
    // 105.5 up to nearest 100 = 200
    // 105.5 up to nearest 0.2 = 105.6
    // 105.5 up to nearest 0.3 = 105.6

    //if no rounto then just pass original number back
    if (roundto == 0)
    {
        return passednumber;
    }
    else
    {
        return Math.Ceiling(passednumber / roundto) * roundto;
    }
}

public static Double RoundDownToNearest(Double passednumber, Double roundto)
{
    // 105.5 down to nearest 1 = 105
    // 105.5 down to nearest 10 = 100
    // 105.5 down to nearest 7 = 105
    // 105.5 down to nearest 100 = 100
    // 105.5 down to nearest 0.2 = 105.4
    // 105.5 down to nearest 0.3 = 105.3

    //if no rounto then just pass original number back
    if (roundto == 0)
    {
        return passednumber;
    }
    else
    {
        return Math.Floor(passednumber / roundto) * roundto;
    }
}
1
  • 1
    Very Nice. We may add a third overload with Math.Round: return ((NearestΑttractor != 0) ? Math.Round(passednumber / NearestΑttractor) * NearestΑttractor : passednumber);
    – anefeletos
    Dec 30, 2020 at 23:13
2

There are several options. If performance is a concern, test them to see which works fastest in a large loop.

double Adjust(double input)
{
    double whole = Math.Truncate(input);
    double remainder = input - whole;
    if (remainder < 0.3)
    {
        remainder = 0;
    }
    else if (remainder < 0.8)
    {
        remainder = 0.5;
    }
    else
    {
        remainder = 1;
    }
    return whole + remainder;
}
3
  • 1
    This should work, but it just isn't as elegant as some solutions given. Multiplying and using the system library is just sexy.
    – captncraig
    Aug 25, 2009 at 16:45
  • 1
    Performance is usually more important, and this could end up taking less time than the multiplication and division solutions. Aug 25, 2009 at 17:57
  • 3
    This code is not correct. Since arithmetic with doubles usually has some small rounding errors, an operation such as 4.8 - 4.0 could give for example 0.799999... . In this case the code above would round to 4.5. Also better would to use Math.Floor instead of Math.Truncate, because right now negative numbers are not corretly rounded. I prefer the accepted answer,because it is simpler and less prone to implementation errors. Aug 25, 2009 at 19:46
1
decimal d = // your number..

decimal t = d - Math.Floor(d);
if(t >= 0.3d && t <= 0.7d)
{
    return Math.Floor(d) + 0.5d;
}
else if(t>0.7d)
    return Math.Ceil(d);
return Math.Floor(d);
1

Sounds like you need to round to the nearest 0.5. I see no version of round in the C# API that does this (one version takes a number of decimal digits to round to, which isn't the same thing).

Assuming you only have to deal with integer numbers of tenths, it's sufficient to calculate round (num * 2) / 2. If you're using arbitrarily precise decimals, it gets trickier. Let's hope you don't.

1

These lines of code snap a float dx to nearest snap:

if (snap <= 1f)
    dx = Mathf.Floor(dx) + (Mathf.Round((dx - Mathf.Floor(dx)) * (1f / snap)) * snap);
else
    dx = Mathf.Round(dx / snap) * snap;

So if snap is 0.5, value gets rounded to nearest 0.5 value (1.37 goes to 1.5), if it is 0.02, value is rounded to nearest 0.02 ((1.37 goes to 1.38)). If snap is 3, value is rounded to nearest 3 (7.4 goes to 6, 7.6 goes to 9) etc... I use it to quickly snap objects on scene in unity because unity default snapping doesn't seem to work well for me.

1
  • This is the only code on this page which worked 100% of the time for me! Many thanks! Jun 23, 2021 at 15:53
0
Public Function Round(ByVal text As TextBox) As Integer
    Dim r As String = Nothing
    If text.TextLength > 3 Then
        Dim Last3 As String = (text.Text.Substring(text.Text.Length - 3))
        If Last3.Substring(0, 1) = "." Then
            Dim dimcalvalue As String = Last3.Substring(Last3.Length - 2)
            If Val(dimcalvalue) >= 50 Then
                text.Text = Val(text.Text) - Val(Last3)
                text.Text = Val(text.Text) + 1
            ElseIf Val(dimcalvalue) < 50 Then
                text.Text = Val(text.Text) - Val(Last3)
            End If
        End If
    End If
    Return r
End Function
1
  • 6
    This code does not look like C# as wanted in the question. What does it do? Please provide some explanation rather than just a lump of code in an unspecified language.
    – AdrianHHH
    Jan 25, 2017 at 13:45
0

This answer is taken from Rosdi Kasim's comment in the answer that John Rasch provided.

John's answer works but does have an overflow possibility.

Here is my version of Rosdi's code:

I also put it in an extension to make it easy to use. The extension is not necessary and could be used as a function without issue.

<Extension>
Public Function ToHalf(value As Decimal) As Decimal
    Dim integerPart = Decimal.Truncate(value)
    Dim fractionPart = value - Decimal.Truncate(integerPart)
    Dim roundedFractionPart = Math.Round(fractionPart * 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) / 2
    Dim newValue = integerPart + roundedFractionPart
    Return newValue
End Function

The usage would then be:

Dim newValue = CDec(1.26).ToHalf

This would return 1.5

0
-1

I had difficulty with this problem as well. I code mainly in Actionscript 3.0 which is base coding for the Adobe Flash Platform, but there are simularities in the Languages:

The solution I came up with is the following:

//Code for Rounding to the nearest 0.05
var r:Number = Math.random() * 10;  // NUMBER - Input Your Number here
var n:int = r * 10;   // INTEGER - Shift Decimal 2 places to right
var f:int = Math.round(r * 10 - n) * 5;// INTEGER - Test 1 or 0 then convert to 5
var d:Number = (n + (f / 10)) / 10; //  NUMBER - Re-assemble the number

trace("ORG No: " + r);
trace("NEW No: " + d);

Thats pretty much it. Note the use of 'Numbers' and 'Integers' and the way they are processed.

Good Luck!

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