5

I have a C# application that calls:

Microsoft.Win32.Registry.CurrentUser.OpenSubKey(@"Software\MyApp")                

It is set to target x86, and when I run it I can see from Task Manager that it is a 32-bit process. However that line of code is strangely going to the 64-bit hive at HKCU\Software\MyApp, instead of the 32-bit hive at HKCU\Software\Wow6432Node\MyApp. Any ideas?

I also started two instances of Powershell, one 32-bit and one 64-bit, and ran the below but both return the values at the 64-bit hive too.

get-itemproperty -Path Registry::HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\MyApp 

Any ideas what might have gone wrong here? I have triple-checked that the registry settings at the 32 and 64 bit hives are different from regedit too.

1
  • It could be that the CRL detects that u are using a 64 bit comptuer and goes that hive. Just a guess though!!
    – FrostyFire
    Nov 9, 2012 at 2:13

1 Answer 1

4

Because you are accessing a key (HKCU\Software) that is shared, not redirected. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms724072(v=vs.85).aspx and (more specifically) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa384253(v=vs.85).aspx

From the first link (emphasis mine):

On 64-bit Windows, portions of the registry entries are stored separately for 32-bit application and 64-bit applications and mapped into separate logical registry views using the registry redirector and registry reflection, because the 64-bit version of an application may use different registry keys and values than the 32-bit version. There are also shared registry keys that are not redirected or reflected.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.