I need to add a specific column if it does not exist. I have something like the following, but it always returns false:

IF EXISTS(SELECT *
          FROM   INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
          WHERE  TABLE_NAME = 'myTableName'
                 AND COLUMN_NAME = 'myColumnName') 

How can I check if a column exists in a table of the SQL Server database?

  • 10
    I don't actually think there's anything wrong with the code in the question: Works finely for me in 2008 R2. (Maybe you were running it in the wrong database? Maybe your database was case-sensitive and you didn't have the case right in your myTableName / myColumnName strings? This type of query seems more flexible than the COL_LENGTH solution: I'm able to run it against a different database and even over a database link by suitably prefixing "INFORMATION_SCHEMA". Couldn't see how to do that with the COL_LENGTH metadata-function. – mwardm Jun 13 '13 at 14:57
  • 2
    @mwardm - COL_LENGTH('AdventureWorks2012.HumanResources.Department ','ModifiedDate') works fine. – Martin Smith Sep 12 '13 at 16:38
  • 5
    Little related hint: if you want to update a column right after column addition(I believe many users were searching this article for that purpose), you could use EXEC sp_executesql with formed UPDATE statement. – cassandrad Apr 16 '15 at 15:02
  • The real answer is you should add the database you are checking against so it's FROM [YourDatabase].INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS – Alex Kwitny Jun 25 '15 at 22:35

24 Answers 24

up vote 1801 down vote accepted

SQL Server 2005 onwards:

IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM sys.columns 
          WHERE Name = N'columnName'
          AND Object_ID = Object_ID(N'schemaName.tableName'))
BEGIN
    -- Column Exists
END

Martin Smith's version is shorter:

IF COL_LENGTH('schemaName.tableName', 'columnName') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    -- Column Exists
END

A more concise version

IF COL_LENGTH('table_name','column_name') IS NULL
BEGIN
/* Column does not exist or caller does not have permission to view the object */
END

The point about permissions on viewing metadata applies to all answers not just this one.

Note that the first parameter table name to COL_LENGTH can be in one, two, or three part name format as required.

An example referencing a table in a different database is

COL_LENGTH('AdventureWorks2012.HumanResources.Department','ModifiedDate')

One difference with this answer compared to using the metadata views is that metadata functions such as COL_LENGTH always only return data about committed changes irrespective of the isolation level in effect.

  • 10
    This is less readable than some of the other answers, probably why it's not as highly rated. – Bill Yang Nov 30 '11 at 22:09
  • 36
    @Bill - Less readable in what way? Looks fine in Firefox. This answer was posted more than 2 years later than the accepted one, which explains the rating IMO. If you meant less clear that it is an existence check this type of idiom is quite common in SQL Server. e.g. using IF OBJECT_ID('TableName','U') IS NULL to check object existence or DB_ID('foo') to check database existence. – Martin Smith Nov 30 '11 at 22:31
  • 50
    @MartinSmith I'm sure he meant less readable because if you didn't know this idiom, and you inherited this code from someone else, you would not immediately understand what the code does. Kind of like writing x>>2 instead of x/4 in C++. The more verbose code (if exists (select column_name from information_schema ...)) takes a lot more space, but no one would ever scratch their head trying to figure out what it does. – Kip Aug 20 '13 at 16:49
  • 18
    Besides more concise this is a way faster solution. Accessing INFORMATION_SCHEMA views or sys.columns hits disk, while COL_LENGTH uses cached database metadata. – wqw Jan 13 '14 at 8:49
  • 7
    This is probably not the most highly rated answer because it was given 2.5 years after the other one. That's why I always check the dates when comparing the ratings on two answers. It takes a lot longer to overcome an answer that was given much earlier. ;) – Sean Feb 28 '14 at 19:35

Tweak the below to suit your specific requirements:

if not exists (select
                     column_name
               from
                     INFORMATION_SCHEMA.columns
               where
                     table_name = 'MyTable'
                     and column_name = 'MyColumn')
    alter table MyTable add MyColumn int

Edit to deal with edit to question: That should work - take a careful look over your code for stupid mistakes; are you querying INFORMATION_SCHEMA on the same database as your insert is being applied to for example? Do you have a typo in your table/column name in either statement?

  • 3
    I just found out that adding TABLE_SCHEMA = 'mySchema' after where clause fixes the problem. – Maciej Sep 25 '08 at 17:01
  • 9
    -1: does not answer OP's question, only adds the new information on how to add a new collumn despite OP not asking about that at all, does not address OP's comment. – ANeves Nov 2 '11 at 11:46

Try this...

IF NOT EXISTS(
  SELECT TOP 1 1
  FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
  WHERE 
    [TABLE_NAME] = 'Employees'
    AND [COLUMN_NAME] = 'EmployeeID')
BEGIN
  ALTER TABLE [Employees]
    ADD [EmployeeID] INT NULL
END
  • 6
    This method also works with SQL CE, whereas some of the other methods mentioned do not. – Sandra Walters Nov 14 '13 at 20:00
  • 8
    You can use SELECT 1 instead of SELECT TOP 1 1 ;). – shA.t Jun 15 '15 at 12:22
  • 3
    Within an EXISTS statement SQL automatically optimizes the columns away (much like count(*)) so SELECT * will suffice. – Marc L. Mar 1 '16 at 19:49

I'd prefer INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS over a system table because Microsoft does not guarantee to preserve the system tables between versions. For example, dbo.syscolumns does still work in SQL 2008, but it's deprecated and could be removed at any time in future.

  • 6
  • 3
    Well yes, that goes without saying since INFORMATION_SCHEMA views contain only ANSI-standard metadata. However, that is sufficient for an existence test. – Christian Hayter Feb 26 '13 at 17:15
  • 1
    Microsoft says "In future releases of SQL Server, Microsoft may augment the definition of any system catalog view by adding columns to the end of the column list. We recommend against using the syntax SELECT * FROM sys.catalog_view_name in production code because the number of columns returned might change and break your application." That implies that they won't remove columns or change their order. That's good enough backward compatibility for all but edge cases. – siride Jul 12 '13 at 21:26

You can use the information schema system views to find out pretty much anything about the tables you're interested in:

SELECT *
  FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
 WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'yourTableName'
 ORDER BY ORDINAL_POSITION

You can also interrogate views, stored procedures and pretty much anything about the database using the Information_schema views.

First check if the table/column(id/name) combination exists in dbo.syscolumns (an internal SQL Server table that contains field definitions), and if not issue the appropriate ALTER TABLE query to add it. For example:

IF NOT EXISTS ( SELECT  *
            FROM    syscolumns
            WHERE   id = OBJECT_ID('Client')
                    AND name = 'Name' ) 
ALTER TABLE Client
ADD Name VARCHAR(64) NULL

Try something like:

CREATE FUNCTION ColumnExists(@TableName varchar(100), @ColumnName varchar(100))
RETURNS varchar(1) AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @Result varchar(1);
IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns WHERE TABLE_NAME = @TableName AND COLUMN_NAME = @ColumnName)
BEGIN
    SET @Result = 'T'
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    SET @Result = 'F'
END
RETURN @Result;
END
GO

GRANT EXECUTE ON  [ColumnExists] TO [whoever]
GO

Then use it like this:

IF ColumnExists('xxx', 'yyyy') = 'F'
BEGIN
  ALTER TABLE xxx
  ADD yyyyy varChar(10) NOT NULL
END
GO

It should work on both SQL Server 2000 & SQL Server 2005. Not sure about SQL Server 2008, but don't see why not.

For the people who is checking the column existence to drop it.

In SQL Server 2016 you can use new DIE statements instead of big IF wrappers

ALTER TABLE Table_name DROP COLUMN IF EXISTS Column_name
declare @myColumn   as nvarchar(128)
set @myColumn = 'myColumn'
if not exists (
    select  1
    from    information_schema.columns columns 
    where   columns.table_catalog   = 'myDatabase'
        and columns.table_schema    = 'mySchema' 
        and columns.table_name      = 'myTable' 
        and columns.column_name     = @myColumn
    )
begin
    exec('alter table myDatabase.mySchema.myTable add'
    +'    ['+@myColumn+'] bigint       null')
end

A good friend and colleague of mine showed me how you can also use an IF block with SQL functions OBJECT_ID and COLUMNPROPERTY in SQL SERVER 2005+ to check for a column. You can use something similar to the following:

You can see for yourself here

IF (OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[myTable]') IS NOT NULL AND
    COLUMNPROPERTY( OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[myTable]'), 'ThisColumnDoesNotExist', 'ColumnId') IS NULL)
BEGIN
    SELECT 'Column does not exist -- You can add TSQL to add the column here'
END
  • And of course, if you are confident that the table exists, you can leave out the first part of the condition and check on COLUMNPROPERTY only. – Ruud Helderman Dec 12 '14 at 12:52

This worked for me in SQL 2000:

IF EXISTS 
(
    SELECT * 
    FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
    WHERE table_name = 'table_name' 
    AND column_name = 'column_name'
)
BEGIN
...
END

Try this

SELECT COLUMNS.*
FROM   INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS COLUMNS,
       INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES TABLES
WHERE  COLUMNS.TABLE_NAME = TABLES.TABLE_NAME
       AND Upper(COLUMNS.COLUMN_NAME) = Upper('column_name') 
  • You don't need INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES and you don't filter columns for a specific table, So it sometimes will return more than one row for same column names in separate tables ;). – shA.t Jun 15 '15 at 12:34

I needed similar for SQL SERVER 2000 and, as @Mitch points out, this only works inm 2005+.

Should it help anyone else, this is what worked for me in the end:

if exists (
    select * 
    from 
        sysobjects, syscolumns 
    where 
        sysobjects.id = syscolumns.id 
        and sysobjects.name = 'table' 
        and syscolumns.name = 'column')
if exists (select * from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS where TABLE_NAME='<table_name>' and COLUMN_NAME='<column_name>')
  begin
    print 'Column you have specified exists'
  end
else
  begin
    print 'Column does not exists'
  end
IF NOT EXISTS( SELECT NULL
            FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
           WHERE table_name = 'tablename'
             AND table_schema = 'db_name'
             AND column_name = 'columnname')  THEN

  ALTER TABLE `TableName` ADD `ColumnName` int(1) NOT NULL default '0';

END IF;
  • 1
    I think you meant table_schema='schema_name'. – Tab Alleman Jul 28 '14 at 13:17
select distinct object_name(sc.id)
from syscolumns sc,sysobjects so  
where sc.name like '%col_name%' and so.type='U'

A temp table version of the accepted answer:

if (exists(select 1 
             from tempdb.sys.columns  
            where Name = 'columnName'
              and Object_ID = object_id('tempdb..#tableName')))
begin
...
end
  • How is that different from the accepted answer? Would a temp table not work in the accepted answer? – John Saunders Jan 8 '15 at 1:24
  • Correct. The accepted answer does not work for temp tables because 'sys.columns' must be specified as 'tempdb.sys.columns' and the table name must be preceeded by 'tempdb..'. – crokusek Jan 8 '15 at 20:08

Wheat's answer is good, but assumes you do not have any identical table name / column name pairs in any schema or database. To make it safe for that condition use this...

select *
from Information_Schema.Columns
where Table_Catalog = 'DatabaseName'
  and Table_Schema = 'SchemaName'
  and Table_Name = 'TableName'
  and Column_Name = 'ColumnName'

One of the most simple and understandable solution is:

IF COL_LENGTH('Table_Name','Column_Name') IS NULL
 BEGIN
    -- Column Not Exists, implement your logic
 END 
ELSE
 BEGIN
    -- Column Exists, implement your logic
 END

Here is a simple script I use to manage addition of columns in the database:

IF NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM sys.Columns
        WHERE Name = N'QbId'
            AND Object_Id = Object_Id(N'Driver')
        )
BEGIN
    ALTER TABLE Driver ADD QbId NVARCHAR(20) NULL
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    PRINT 'QbId is already added on Driver'
END

In this example, the Name is the ColumnName to be added and Object_Id is the TableName

  • Perfect answer because generally we need to check column only if we have a corresponding alter table command :) – vibs2006 Jun 1 at 7:14

There are several ways to check the existence of a column. I would strongly recommend to use INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS as it is created in order to communicate with user. Consider following tables:

 sys.objects
 sys.columns

and even some other access methods available to check system catalog.

Also, no need to use SELECT *, simply test it by NULL value

IF EXISTS(
           SELECT NULL 
           FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
           WHERE
             TABLE_NAME = 'myTableName'
             AND COLUMN_NAME = 'myColumnName'
         ) 
  • No matter even if you SELECT * with EXISTS, because when exists is used it doesn't really select all the rows and all the columns, internally it just checks for the existence and not actually checks for all rows and columns – Pawan Nogariya Nov 23 at 8:55

Below query can be used to check whether searched column exists or not in the table. We can take decision based on the searched result also as shown below.

IF EXISTS (SELECT 'Y' FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE TABLE_NAME = <YourTableName> AND COLUMN_NAME = <YourColumnName>)
  BEGIN
    SELECT 'Column Already Exists.'
  END
  ELSE
  BEGIN
    ALTER TABLE <YourTableName> ADD <YourColumnName> <DataType>[Size]
  END

Yet another variation...

SELECT Count(*) AS existFlag FROM sys.columns 
WHERE [name] = N'ColumnName' AND [object_id] = OBJECT_ID(N'TableName')

protected by bummi Oct 13 '14 at 11:02

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