17

I would like to find a GUI'd client that shows TFS branch history like I'm used to viewing in some popular git clients. Here's a great picture from SourceTree, though SmartGit does every bit as well.

SourceTree for git on Mac

See how awesome it is to see your checkin history? Even better, you can pick two checkins and see a diff (list of files you can select to see diffs for the selected file) of what's changed between any two.

Does an app like that exist for TFS?

Note: I did find this question, whose title sounds close: Standalone GUI client for TFS 2010 Source Control

I'm pretty sure by "GUI" there the answers just mean "the GUI you already likely have if you're running VS2010" aka "not the command line". I didn't see a good solution for getting this sort of branch mapping and quick change comparison.

Or perhaps I've missed it and such a map/GUI is already in TFS on VS?

EDIT: Adding picture of File menu to Branching and Merging. I don't seem to have the option M.Radwan mentions.

enter image description here

3

You can View the Branch Hierarchy of a Team Project by go to Source Control Explorer, click the branch from which you want to begin to explore your branch structure after that, Click the File menu, point to Source Control, point to Branching and Merging, and then click View Hierarchy.

View the Branch Hierarchy of a Team Project

enter image description here

  • So if I don't have those options, I'm not on a branch, perhaps? (See image added to question) – ruffin Nov 12 '12 at 17:41
  • Yes, you have to select a branch so this option can be available – Mohamed.Radwan -MVP Nov 13 '12 at 3:14
  • Sorry, I mean if the project I've selected is, itself, not a branch. I assumed we would have branched our "spike" of the development codebase, but if I don't see these options, then am I to assume there's no parent/hierarchy for the code? I'm going to assume yes for now and play with a trivial solution later today. Thanks. – ruffin Nov 13 '12 at 14:48
  • 2
    Thanks for sharing, but I already knew about this feature. Not sure why OP originally accepted this answer as the solution, because as far as I can tell / am concerned it does not answer the question: this visualization tells you nothing about checkin history / commits that pull changes from one branch into another. – Jeroen May 23 '16 at 6:03
  • 2
    @Jeroen Accepted mainly out of frustration that most answers when I've asked elsewhere completely misunderstood my question, and at least this is visual. Low bar, I know, and I actually think the "right" answer is that there isn't such a tool. If you've got a better visualization tool, I'd be happy to move the check. Jim's answer isn't bad -- check that link, though I think it's changeset-centric. But neither are near as nice as the tools I'm used to on git. If I was still using TFS, I'd be tempted to steal a C# git client & write one myself. – ruffin Dec 2 '16 at 22:01
8

Bourgeon. Available for Visual Studio 2013 and 2015. No signs so far of a port to 2017...

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=StefanLober.Bourgeon

Bourgeon screenshot

Obviously the author is a git user who was forced to use TFS.

  • Stefan Lober wrote in a comment-as-an-answer: "Thank you, Malcolm O, for mentioning Bourgeon. I planned to include some new features and fixes along with VS 2017 support. This is taking longer than I expected (this being only a free time project), but it should be finished in a few weeks." – Stephen Kennedy Jun 9 '18 at 11:20
  • Wonderful to hear Stefan. I love your plugin - it makes following complex branch history a breeze. I really appreciate the time you put into it. Let me know if you need a tester. – Malcolm O Jun 11 '18 at 1:28
  • Now says "Works with Visual Studio 2013, 2015, 2017, 2019". Looks like it's time to give this a shot! Thanks. – ruffin Mar 21 at 14:41
5

You can use the branching and "track changes" visualizations. See the blog post below for details:

http://www.edsquared.com/2010/03/17/Branching+And+Track+Changes+Visualization+In+TFS+2010+Is+Awesome.aspx

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.