7

I have a struct that is defined with Pack=1 and it is 29 bytes long. If it is not packed, it would be 32 bytes long.

  • Marshal.SizeOf(TypeOf(StructName)) returns 29.

  • StructName struct; sizeof(struct) returns 32.

When I write that struct out using MemoryMappedViewAccessor it writes out 32 bytes, NOT 29 bytes.

So, short of marshalling the struct to a byte array and writing it out that way, is there any way to get it to write out that struct correctly?

More detail: if you use Explicit layout, Write will, in fact, write out 29 bytes. WriteArray, though, writes out 32 bytes for each element.

And avip, yes, meticulous byte serializing will probably work, but (and I didn't profile it but I am guessing) it is probably orders of magnitude slower than a WriteArray would be, no?

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  • Did you define layout attribute S.A [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)] ? You have to do that to avoid padding. – avishayp Nov 10 '12 at 4:59
  • [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, Pack = 1)] - according to documentation, that should eliminate padding (and does), except neither sizeof nor the MemoryMappedViewAccessor acknowledge that. The doc for the sequential layout says: Sequential The members of the object are laid out sequentially, in the order in which they appear when exported to unmanaged memory. The members are laid out according to the packing specified in StructLayoutAttribute.Pack, and can be noncontiguous. – MikeMedved Nov 10 '12 at 5:07
  • It is an implementation detail for MMFs, it uses Marshal.AlignedSizeOf<T>() regardless of the packing. – Hans Passant Nov 10 '12 at 21:15
  • @Hans but the actual memory map is also not packed. – avishayp Nov 10 '12 at 22:43
  • Erm, the memory map is whatever you make it. That it is 32 bytes instead of 29 doesn't matter at all unless you try to sub-divide the map and get sub-sections aligned. Yes, this goes bad with Pack=1, it can't assume that if one struct has Pack=1 that all the other ones have it as well. Always a bad idea to pack like that, the default of 8 is there for a very good reason. I'd assume the OP was left with a bad choice he couldn't control. You restated what he already knew, marshal yourself. – Hans Passant Nov 10 '12 at 23:07
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Edit: OK I finally understood what you're really asking. We usually don'y use MemoryMappedViewAccessor to serialize objects, and now you know why.

The following will give you the expected result.

public static class ByteSerializer
{
    public static Byte[] Serialize<T>(IEnumerable<T> msg) where T : struct
    {
        List<byte> res = new List<byte>();
        foreach (var s in msg)
        {
            res.AddRange(Serialize(s));
        }
        return res.ToArray();
    }

    public static Byte[] Serialize<T>(T msg) where T : struct
    {
        int objsize = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T));
        Byte[] ret = new Byte[objsize];

        IntPtr buff = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(objsize);
        Marshal.StructureToPtr(msg, buff, true);
        Marshal.Copy(buff, ret, 0, objsize);
        Marshal.FreeHGlobal(buff);
        return ret;
    }
}

class Program
{
    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)]
    struct Yours
    {
        public Int64 int1;
        public DateTime dt1;
        public float f1;
        public float f2;
        public float f3;
        public byte b;
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        var file = @"c:\temp\test.bin";
        IEnumerable<Yours> t = new Yours[3];
        File.WriteAllBytes(file, ByteSerializer.Serialize(t));

        using (var stream = File.OpenRead(file))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("file size: " + stream.Length);
        }
    }
}

EDIT: So it appears DateTime really likes to be on an aligned memory address. Though you can define the explicit layout, I think a more simple approach would be:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)]
public struct Test
{
    private long dt1; 
    public byte b;
    public Int64 int1;
    public float f1;
    public float f2;
    public float f3;

    public DateTime DT
    {
        get { return new DateTime(dt1); }
        set { dt1 = value.Ticks; }
    }
}

Though I don't see why you should care about managed memory representation at all.

Alternatively, [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)] should prevent memory alignment.

Example (the 'managed sizeof' is taken from this post)

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, Size = 9)]
public struct Test
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public DateTime dt1;
    [FieldOffset(8)]
    public byte b;
}

class Program
{
    static readonly Func<Type, uint> SizeOfType = (Func<Type, uint>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<Type, uint>), typeof(Marshal).GetMethod("SizeOfType", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static));

    static void Main()
    {
        Test t = new Test() { dt1 = DateTime.MaxValue, b = 42 };
        Console.WriteLine("Managed size: " + SizeOfType(typeof(Test)));
        Console.WriteLine("Unmanaged size: " + Marshal.SizeOf(t));
        using (MemoryMappedFile file = MemoryMappedFile.CreateNew(null, 1))
        using (MemoryMappedViewAccessor accessor = file.CreateViewAccessor())
        {
            accessor.Write(0L, ref t);
            long pos = 0;

            for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++)
                Console.Write("|" + accessor.ReadByte(pos++));
            Console.Write("|\n");
        }
    }
}

Output:

Managed size: 9
Unmanaged size: 9
|255|63|55|244|117|40|202|43|42|   // managed memory layout is as expected

BTW, DateTime seems to break the sequential contract - but remember the contract is for the Marshaled memory map. There is no specification with regard to managed memory layout.

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1, Size = 9)]
public struct Test
{
    public DateTime dt1;
    public byte b;
}

And the output of above code:

Managed size: 12
Unmanaged size: 9
|42|0|0|0|255|63|55|244|117|40|202|43|   // finally found those 3 missing bytes :-)
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  • Thank you avip, and I did realize this, it does provide another method that avoids the marshalling to a byte array, and I am doing that right now, but why isn't sequential layout with Pack=1 working as it should per the documentation? – MikeMedved Nov 10 '12 at 7:35
  • Do you happen to have 4 chars hiding somewhere in the struct ? – avishayp Nov 10 '12 at 8:20
  • No chars :) ` public Int64 int1; public DateTime dt1; public float f1; public float f2; public float f3; public byte b; ` – MikeMedved Nov 10 '12 at 15:31
  • But it is a 3 byte gap :) 29 vs 32 – MikeMedved Nov 10 '12 at 18:35
  • "Though I don't see why you should care about managed memory representation at all." - well I don't really, I just wanted it to be 29 bytes for real in order to save on space (there will be millions of these in the file). And as I pointed out in the OP it was actually writing out 32 bytes. – MikeMedved Nov 10 '12 at 21:03

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