52

The underscore library provides a debounce function that prevents multiple calls to a function within a set period of time. Their version makes use of setTimeout.

How could we do this in pure AngularJS code?

Moreover, can we make use of $q style promises to retrieve the return value from the called function after the debounce period?

3
  • 1
    A side note: You most probably asked this because you have too many requests firing when you only want one to fire. I have been facing this issue for the last 3 days and with a dozen attempts of restructuring my code and reading the documentation, I have achieved what I wanted without enforcing setTimeout. I'm generalizing here but see if you can approach your issue the same way. Nov 10, 2012 at 7:06
  • Very enigmatic comment! I would be interested to see what you came up with. I agree that this should not be used just to deal with too many watchers firing too often. It wasn't actually my issue but one that was put in the mailing list .
    – Pete BD
    Nov 11, 2012 at 7:29
  • 3
    Where I think it could be useful is where you have something happening due to user input like an async lookup on a server to autocomplete an input box. You might only want the lookup to happen when the user stops typing for a while.
    – Pete BD
    Nov 11, 2012 at 7:32

6 Answers 6

94

Here is a working example of such a service: http://plnkr.co/edit/fJwRER?p=preview. It creates a $q deferred object that will be resolved when the debounced function is finally called.

Each time the debounce function is called the promise to the next call of the inner function is returned.

// Create an AngularJS service called debounce
app.factory('debounce', ['$timeout','$q', function($timeout, $q) {
  // The service is actually this function, which we call with the func
  // that should be debounced and how long to wait in between calls
  return function debounce(func, wait, immediate) {
    var timeout;
    // Create a deferred object that will be resolved when we need to
    // actually call the func
    var deferred = $q.defer();
    return function() {
      var context = this, args = arguments;
      var later = function() {
        timeout = null;
        if(!immediate) {
          deferred.resolve(func.apply(context, args));
          deferred = $q.defer();
        }
      };
      var callNow = immediate && !timeout;
      if ( timeout ) {
        $timeout.cancel(timeout);
      }
      timeout = $timeout(later, wait);
      if (callNow) {
        deferred.resolve(func.apply(context,args));
        deferred = $q.defer();
      }
      return deferred.promise;
    };
  };
}]);

You get the return value from the debounced function by using the then method on the promise.

$scope.addMsg = function(msg) {
    console.log('addMsg called with', msg);
    return msg;
};

$scope.addMsgDebounced = debounce($scope.addMsg, 2000, false);

$scope.logReturn = function(msg) {
    console.log('logReturn called with', msg);
    var promise = $scope.addMsgDebounced(msg);
    promise.then(function(msg) {
        console.log('Promise resolved with', msg);
    });
};

If you call logReturn multiple times in quick succession you will see the logReturn call logged over and over but only one addMsg call logged.

22
  • 1
    Out of curiosity, do you find the returned promises of any use? For instance in the case of an autocomplete, it would be nice to have a single promise that tells me what the user finally typed, but not a promise per keystroke. I'm starting to feel like you can get away with promises, and you can get away with debouncing + callback, but not both. Feb 7, 2013 at 22:44
  • 3
    Actually this is not a bug in the debounce service. It returns the same promise on every call until the timeout completes. The trouble is that the Add Message (logged) was doing a call to then on the same promise over and over again on each call. So when the single promise resolved, the numerous then handlers were being run. Here is a better demo that tracks the promise and only adds one handler per promise: plnkr.co/edit/afX9v0?p=preview
    – Pete BD
    Feb 12, 2013 at 10:15
  • 1
    Strictly the same promise is returned for each resolve. So you can take the first, middle or last promise between each resolve.
    – Pete BD
    Feb 14, 2013 at 17:44
  • 2
    there's a typo on the very last line: }); should be }]); unless I missed something ... worked for me, thanks for this! Oct 11, 2013 at 0:54
  • 2
    Also, returned needs to be called before calling .then()
    – DanS
    Nov 7, 2013 at 8:10
57

Angular 1.3 has debounce as standard

Worth mentioning that debounce comes built in with Angular 1.3. As you'd expect, it's implemented as a directive. You can do this:

<input ng-model='address' ng-model-options="{ debounce: 500 }" />

The $scope.address attribute is not updated until 500ms after the last keystroke.

If you need more control

If you want more granularity, you can set different bounce times for different events:

<input ng-model='person.address' ng-model-options="{ updateOn: 'default blur', debounce: {'default': 500, 'blur': 0} }" />

Here for example we have a 500ms debounce for a keystroke, and no debounce for a blur.

Documentation

Read the documentation here: https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/directive/ngModelOptions

2
  • 2
    You can't debounce button clicks this way. Say I want to click a button to increase some value on the model, each click is +N, and debounce saving the model. Jul 9, 2017 at 21:00
  • 2
    @VladimirPrudnikov - Yes, ng-model-options only works with ng-model, not ng-click. Jul 10, 2017 at 11:06
33

Since I've written the comments above I've had a bit of a change of heart on this.

The short answer is, you shouldn't need to debounce functions that return values.

Why? Well, philosophically I think it makes more sense to keep debouncing for events and only for events. If you have a method that returns a value that you'd like to debounce, you should instead debounce the event that causes your method to run downstream.

2
  • 3
    I agree with Roy here
    – Pete BD
    Aug 27, 2013 at 20:09
  • 2
    this is a very good point; I went with this solution and used underscore's debounce Oct 11, 2013 at 1:03
8

Pete BD gave a good start to the debounce service, however, I see two problems:

  1. returns when you should send in a work() callback that uses javascript closure if you need to change state in the caller.
  2. timeout variable - isn't that timeout variable a problem? timeout[] maybe? imagine 2 directives using debounce - signalr, input form validator, I believe the factory approach would break down.

What I am currently using:

I changed factory to a service so each directive gets a NEW instance of debounce aka new instance of the timeout variable. - i haven't ran into a situation where 1 directive will need timeout to be timeout[].

.service('reactService', ['$timeout', '$q', function ($timeout, $q) {
    this.Debounce = function () {
        var timeout;

        this.Invoke = function (func, wait, immediate) {
            var context = this, args = arguments;
            var later = function () {
                timeout = null;
                if (!immediate) {
                    func.apply(context, args);
                }
            };
            var callNow = immediate && !timeout;
            if (timeout) {
                $timeout.cancel(timeout);
            }
            timeout = $timeout(later, wait);
            if (callNow) {
                func.apply(context, args);
            }
        };
        return this;
    }
}]);

in my angularjs remote validator

    .directive('remoteValidator', ['$http', 'reactService', function ($http, reactService) {
        return {
            require: 'ngModel',
            link: function (scope, elm, attrs, ctrl) {
                var newDebounce = new reactService.Debounce();

                var work = function(){
//....
                };

                elm.on('blur keyup change', function () {
                   newDebounce.Invoke(function(){ scope.$apply(work); }, 1000, false);
                });
            }
        };
    }])
8
  • It seems you don't need $q dependency here Feb 27, 2014 at 14:19
  • @AndreyKouznetsov agree - cp from Pete BD version, edited the code with change - thanks Feb 27, 2014 at 15:45
  • Part of your answer seems to be a misunderstanding of factories. The factory returns the service, so in Pete's answer, the timeout variable is inside of the service, just like yours.
    – m59
    Aug 17, 2014 at 18:19
  • @m59 Documentation: "The Service recipe produces a service just like the Value or Factory recipes, but it does so by invoking a constructor with the new operator." Pete BD version you get a cached value as stated by docs. Aug 18, 2014 at 17:40
  • @LeblancMeneses You're correct about the issue, but not the solution. Both methods produce singletons, so the same instance is used each time. The docs are referring to the way the service is created the first time. That same instance will be used from then on.
    – m59
    Aug 18, 2014 at 18:13
1

https://github.com/capaj/ng-tools/blob/master/src/debounce.js

usage:

app.directive('autosavable', function(debounce) {
    return {
        restrict : 'A',
        require : '?ngModel',
        link : function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {
            var debounced = debounce(function() {
                scope.$broadcast('autoSave');
            }, 5000, false);

            element.bind('keypress', function(e) {
                debounced();
            });
        }
    };
});
1

Support for this has landed in angularjs#1.3.0.beta6 if you're dealing with a model interaction.

https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/directive/ngModelOptions

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.