28

I have the following C# class:

public class JsonBackup
{
    public int Added { set; get; }
    public int DEVCount { set; get; }
    public int DS1Count { set; get; }
    public IList<ViewEvent> Events { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<string> Errors { set; get; }
    public int Rejected { set; get; }
    public bool Success { set; get; }
    public int Updated { set; get; }
}

and this code to return JSON data to my browser:

return Json(new JsonBackup
{
    Added = added,
    DEVCount = devCount,
    DS1Count = ds1Count,
    Events = t.Events,
    Rejected = rejected,
    Success = true,
    Updated = updated
});

The data is returned here:

 $.ajax("/Backup/Data/Backup",
    {
        cache: false,
        dataType: 'json',
        type: 'POST'
    })
 .done(function (data: ) {
     console.log(data);
     backupDone(data, ajaxElapsed);
 });

and used in other places and also here:

   $.each(data.Events, function (i, item) {
        $("#stats-list li:eq("+(4+i)+")").after('<li>' + item.Description + ' : ' + item.Elapsed + ' ms</li>');
    });

Is it possible for me to create a TypeScript type and assign data to that type so I could for example get intellisense when selecting such things as

data.Added or data.DEVCount etc?
52

Simplest way to achieve that is to create interface for IJsonBackup and when you receive json just cast it to IJsonBackup

interface IViewEvent
{
}

interface IJsonBackup
{
    Added : number;
    DEVCount : number;
    DS1Count : number;
    Events : IViewEvent[];
    Errors : string[];
    Rejected : number;
    Success : bool;
    Updated : number;
}

In your class definition:

backupDone(data: IJsonBackup, ajaxElapsed: any)
{
}

$.ajax("/Backup/Data/Backup",
    {
        cache: false,
        dataType: 'json',
        type: 'POST'
    })
    .done(function (data: any) {
        console.log(data);
        backupDone(<IJsonBackup>data, ajaxElapsed);
    });
6
  • 1
    I anticipate a huge problem here. What if the server sends numbers in a form of a string? If we don't call parseFloat explicitly then we get strings instead of numbers. If they are added to each other they will end up concatenated instead like 30+42=3042. Imagine you tried to calculate an average value and they are added wrongly. And the compile-time type check only makes it worse because you are sure they are numbers but they are not. This will lead to bugs that are hard to track.
    – Gherman
    Oct 12 '17 at 12:38
  • Yes, that can be an issue, i agree. IMO in such case we are responsible for all needed parsing before we pass the data further down, and only once that is done we are safe to introduce interface type safety. Typescript wont solve this by itself, its not the right tool for that :). This is also a more general thing to apply, its not really TS-only related - we should always parse the data to expected format if it arrives as a different representation.
    – Slawek
    Oct 12 '17 at 13:42
  • Most languages with static types can guarantee that function parameters are really of those exact types chosen. Typescript does not guarantee that 100%. It happens so because ts types are optional and it has to be compatible with typeless js code.
    – Gherman
    Oct 12 '17 at 13:52
  • 2
    Of course, but in any language if you receive some data from "outside" (like in this case from server responding with json) you have to parse it, directly or indirectly to ensure correct types.
    – Slawek
    Oct 12 '17 at 14:08
  • 3
    Aren't you getting Conversion of type 'AxiosResponse<any>' to type 'IAbout' may be a mistake because neither type sufficiently overlaps with the other. If this was intentional, convert the expression to 'unknown' first. error in such a case? Oct 15 '18 at 10:19

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