88

I am working with a fresh postgresql install, with 'postgres' super user. Logged in via:

sudo -u postgres psql


postgres=# createdb database
postgres-# \list
                                  List of databases
   Name    |  Owner   | Encoding |  Collation  |    Ctype    |   Access privileges   
-----------+----------+----------+-------------+-------------+-----------------------
 postgres  | postgres | UTF8     | en_GB.UTF-8 | en_GB.UTF-8 | 
 template0 | postgres | UTF8     | en_GB.UTF-8 | en_GB.UTF-8 | =c/postgres
                                                             : postgres=CTc/postgres
 template1 | postgres | UTF8     | en_GB.UTF-8 | en_GB.UTF-8 | =c/postgres
                                                             : postgres=CTc/postgres

No errors, yet table is not being created. Any ideas?

180

createdb is a command line utility which you can run from bash and not from psql. To create a database from psql, use the create database statement like so:

create database [databasename];

Note: be sure to always end your SQL statements with ;

  • 31
    Thanks, I'll slap myself now. :) – Damien Roche Nov 10 '12 at 10:00
  • Sure. Easy points ;) Need to wait 7 minutes yet (apparently). Thanks again. – Damien Roche Nov 10 '12 at 10:01
  • 24
    don't forget to add the semicolon at the end ..; – Timothy Dalton Oct 18 '16 at 8:55
  • 1
    that semi-colin for the win! – Michael Dimmitt Oct 5 '19 at 22:53
64

Late to the party, but the accepted answer doesn't explain why no error is displayed. And as this is something Postgres newcomers often stumble upon, I wanted to add that.


TL/TR: always end your SQL statements with ;


Because the createdb database did not end with ; psql thinks the statement isn't finished and waits for more input. This is indicated by the prompt changing from postgres=# to postgres-#. An extremely subtle change that I wish psql would do differently (more "prominent").

By entering the meta-command \list the "current" SQL statement is "aborted" without executing it.

If the createdb had been ended with a ; the output would have been:

postgres=> createdb foobar;
ERROR:  syntax error at or near "createdb"
LINE 1: createdb foobar;
        ^
postgres=>

Clearly showing that something was wrong.

  • 3
    Wow, this is indeed subtle but deadly. I was having this issue for quite some time. The first time you run the command with a semicolon you'll get the error because createdb isn't valid. But then repeating the exact same command with create database instead of createdb along with a semicolon works perfectly. – Glen Selle Mar 19 '16 at 13:28
  • 1
    @Helsing: that's what I wrote, I just explained why there wasn't an error message even though it is invalid – a_horse_with_no_name Dec 7 '18 at 18:01
  • @a_horse_with_no_name Yea, I misunderstood your purpose. Upvoted your answer as well. – Helsing Dec 7 '18 at 18:10
2

I was in this situation not long ago. In case someone else experiences this, considering that the command prompt shows postgres-# you can execute the pending createdb command by simply typing ; and the return key.

0

Create new data base in PostgreSQL is very simple, execute this command on Linux (CentOS 7 example):

sudo -u postgres psql -c "create database MyDb;"

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