103

We need to implement a simple state machine in C.
Is a standard switch statement the best way to go?
We have a current state (state) and a trigger for the transition.


switch(state)
{
  case STATE_1:
     state = DoState1(transition);
     break;
  case STATE_2:
     state = DoState2(transition);
     break;
}
...
DoState2(int transition)
{
   // Do State Work
   ...
   if(transition == FROM_STATE_2) {
     // New state when doing STATE 2 -> STATE 2
   }
   if(transition == FROM_STATE_1) {
    // New State when moving STATE 1 -> STATE 2
   }
   return new_state;
}

Is there a better way for simple state machines

EDIT: For C++, I think the Boost Statechart library might be the way to go. However, it does not help with C. Lets concentrate on the C use case.

19 Answers 19

118

I prefer to use a table driven approach for most state machines:

typedef enum { STATE_INITIAL, STATE_FOO, STATE_BAR, NUM_STATES } state_t;
typedef struct instance_data instance_data_t;
typedef state_t state_func_t( instance_data_t *data );

state_t do_state_initial( instance_data_t *data );
state_t do_state_foo( instance_data_t *data );
state_t do_state_bar( instance_data_t *data );

state_func_t* const state_table[ NUM_STATES ] = {
    do_state_initial, do_state_foo, do_state_bar
};

state_t run_state( state_t cur_state, instance_data_t *data ) {
    return state_table[ cur_state ]( data );
};

int main( void ) {
    state_t cur_state = STATE_INITIAL;
    instance_data_t data;

    while ( 1 ) {
        cur_state = run_state( cur_state, &data );

        // do other program logic, run other state machines, etc
    }
}

This can of course be extended to support multiple state machines, etc. Transition actions can be accommodated as well:

typedef void transition_func_t( instance_data_t *data );

void do_initial_to_foo( instance_data_t *data );
void do_foo_to_bar( instance_data_t *data );
void do_bar_to_initial( instance_data_t *data );
void do_bar_to_foo( instance_data_t *data );
void do_bar_to_bar( instance_data_t *data );

transition_func_t * const transition_table[ NUM_STATES ][ NUM_STATES ] = {
    { NULL,              do_initial_to_foo, NULL },
    { NULL,              NULL,              do_foo_to_bar },
    { do_bar_to_initial, do_bar_to_foo,     do_bar_to_bar }
};

state_t run_state( state_t cur_state, instance_data_t *data ) {
    state_t new_state = state_table[ cur_state ]( data );
    transition_func_t *transition =
               transition_table[ cur_state ][ new_state ];

    if ( transition ) {
        transition( data );
    }

    return new_state;
};

The table driven approach is easier to maintain and extend and simpler to map to state diagrams.

  • Very nice way to get started, at least beginning point for me. One remark, the first line of run_state() has a naughty "." that shouldn't be there. – Atilla Filiz Jun 22 '10 at 14:29
  • 2
    would be better if this answer also would at least say 2 words about the other two approaches: a "global" method with a big switch-case, and separating states with the State Design Pattern and letting each state handle its transitions itself. – erikbwork Sep 3 '13 at 15:56
  • Hi, I know this post is old but I hope I will get my answer :) What certainly should by in instance_data_t variable? I wonder how to change states in interrupts ... is it a good way to store information about processed interrupt in this variable? For example store information that button was pressed so the state should be changed. – grongor Dec 5 '13 at 9:17
  • @GRoNGoR Sounds to me like you're dealing with an event-driven state machine. I think you could use it to store event data indeed. – Zimano Oct 16 '15 at 13:46
  • 3
    Really nice touch how NUM_STATES is defined. – Albin Stigo Dec 19 '15 at 19:38
25

You might have seen my answer to another C question where I mentioned FSM! Here is how I do it:

FSM {
  STATE(x) {
    ...
    NEXTSTATE(y);
  }

  STATE(y) {
    ...
    if (x == 0) 
      NEXTSTATE(y);
    else 
      NEXTSTATE(x);
  }
}

With the following macros defined

#define FSM
#define STATE(x)      s_##x :
#define NEXTSTATE(x)  goto s_##x

This can be modified to suit the specific case. For example, you may have a file FSMFILE that you want to drive your FSM, so you could incorporate the action of reading next char into the the macro itself:

#define FSM
#define STATE(x)         s_##x : FSMCHR = fgetc(FSMFILE); sn_##x :
#define NEXTSTATE(x)     goto s_##x
#define NEXTSTATE_NR(x)  goto sn_##x

now you have two types of transitions: one goes to a state and read a new character, the other goes to a state without consuming any input.

You can also automate the handling of EOF with something like:

#define STATE(x)  s_##x  : if ((FSMCHR = fgetc(FSMFILE) == EOF)\
                             goto sx_endfsm;\
                  sn_##x :

#define ENDFSM    sx_endfsm:

The good thing of this approach is that you can directly translate a state diagram you draw into working code and, conversely, you can easily draw a state diagram from the code.

In other techniques for implementing FSM the structure of the transitions is buried in control structures (while, if, switch ...) and controlled by variables value (tipically a state variable) and it may be a complex task to relate the nice diagram to a convoluted code.

I learned this technique from an article appeared on the great "Computer Language" magazine that, unfortunately, is no longer published.

  • 1
    Fundamentally, a good FSM is all about readability. This provides a good interface, and the implementation is as good as it gets. It is a shame that there isn't a native FSM structure in the language. I can see it now as a late addition to C1X! – Kelden Cowan Apr 1 '10 at 15:32
  • 2
    I love this approach for embedded applications. Is there a way to use this approach with an event-driven state machine? – ARF Feb 26 '16 at 21:25
12

I also have used the table approach. However, there is overhead. Why store a second list of pointers? A function in C without the () is a const pointer. So you can do:

struct state;
typedef void (*state_func_t)( struct state* );

typedef struct state
{
  state_func_t function;

  // other stateful data

} state_t;

void do_state_initial( state_t* );
void do_state_foo( state_t* );
void do_state_bar( state_t* );

void run_state( state_t* i ) {
    i->function(i);
};

int main( void ) {
    state_t state = { do_state_initial };

    while ( 1 ) {
        run_state( state );

        // do other program logic, run other state machines, etc
    }
}

Of course depending on your fear factor (i.e. safety vs speed) you may want to check for valid pointers. For state machines larger than three or so states, the approach above should be less instructions than an equivalent switch or table approach. You could even macro-ize as:

#define RUN_STATE(state_ptr_) ((state_ptr_)->function(state_ptr_))

Also, I feel from the OP's example, that there is a simplification that should be done when thinking about / designing a state machine. I don't thing the transitioning state should be used for logic. Each state function should be able to perform its given role without explicit knowledge of past state(s). Basically you design for how to transition from the state you are in to another state.

Finally, don't start the design of a state machine based on "functional" boundaries, use sub-functions for that. Instead divide the states based on when you will have to wait for something to happen before you can continue. This will help minimize the number of times you have to run the state machine before you get a result. This can be important when writing I/O functions, or interrupt handlers.

Also, a few pros and cons of the classic switch statement:

Pros:

  • it is in the language, so it is documented and clear
  • states are defined where they are called
  • can execute multiple states in one function call
  • code common to all states can be executed before and after the switch statement

Cons:

  • can execute multiple states in one function call
  • code common to all states can be executed before and after the switch statement
  • switch implementation can be slow

Note the two attributes that are both pro and con. I think the switch allows the opportunity for too much sharing between states, and the interdependency between states can become unmanageable. However for a small number of states, it may be the most readable and maintainable.

9

For a simple state machine just use a switch statement and an enum type for your state. Do your transitions inside the switch statement based on your input. In a real program you would obviously change the "if(input)" to check for your transition points. Hope this helps.

typedef enum
{
    STATE_1 = 0,
    STATE_2,
    STATE_3
} my_state_t;

my_state_t state = STATE_1;

void foo(char input)
{
    ...
    switch(state)
    {
        case STATE_1:
            if(input)
                state = STATE_2;
            break;
        case STATE_2:
            if(input)
                state = STATE_3;
            else
                state = STATE_1;
            break;
        case STATE_3:
            ...
            break;
    }
    ...
}
  • 1
    Might be worth putting "state" inside the function, and making it static. – Steve Melnikoff May 11 '09 at 22:40
  • 2
    @Steve Melnikoff: only if you've only got one state machine. Keep it outside the function and you can have an array of state machines with their own state. – Vicky Jun 25 '10 at 12:09
  • @Vicky: One function can contain as many state machines as you like, with an array of state variables if required, which can live inside the function (as static variables) if they're not used elsewhere. – Steve Melnikoff Jun 28 '10 at 12:07
8

there is also the logic grid which is more maintainable as the state machine gets bigger

4

switch() is a powerful and standard way of implementing state machines in C, but it can decrease maintainability down if you have a large number of states. Another common method is to use function pointers to store the next state. This simple example implements a set/reset flip-flop:

/* Implement each state as a function with the same prototype */
void state_one(int set, int reset);
void state_two(int set, int reset);

/* Store a pointer to the next state */
void (*next_state)(int set, int reset) = state_one;

/* Users should call next_state(set, reset). This could
   also be wrapped by a real function that validated input
   and dealt with output rather than calling the function
   pointer directly. */

/* State one transitions to state one if set is true */
void state_one(int set, int reset) {
    if(set)
        next_state = state_two;
}

/* State two transitions to state one if reset is true */
void state_two(int set, int reset) {
    if(reset)
        next_state = state_one;
}
  • +1 for keeping it simple while explaining the concept. – Morten Jensen Jul 9 '12 at 22:26
4

In Martin Fowler's UML Distilled, he states (no pun intended) in Chapter 10 State Machine Diagrams (emphasis mine):

A state diagram can be implemented in three main ways: nested switch, the State pattern, and state tables.

Let's use a simplified example of the states of a mobile phone's display:

enter image description here

Nested switch

Fowler gave an example of C# code, but I've adapted it to my example.

public void HandleEvent(PhoneEvent anEvent) {
    switch (CurrentState) {
    case PhoneState.ScreenOff:
        switch (anEvent) {
        case PhoneEvent.PressButton:
            if (powerLow) { // guard condition
                DisplayLowPowerMessage(); // action
                // CurrentState = PhoneState.ScreenOff;
            } else {
                CurrentState = PhoneState.ScreenOn;
            }
            break;
        case PhoneEvent.PlugPower:
            CurrentState = PhoneState.ScreenCharging;
            break;
        }
        break;
    case PhoneState.ScreenOn:
        switch (anEvent) {
        case PhoneEvent.PressButton:
            CurrentState = PhoneState.ScreenOff;
            break;
        case PhoneEvent.PlugPower:
            CurrentState = PhoneState.ScreenCharging;
            break;
        }
        break;
    case PhoneState.ScreenCharging:
        switch (anEvent) {
        case PhoneEvent.UnplugPower:
            CurrentState = PhoneState.ScreenOff;
            break;
        }
        break;
    }
}

State pattern

Here's an implementation of my example with the GoF State pattern:

enter image description here

State Tables

Taking inspiration from Fowler, here's a table for my example:

Source State    Target State    Event         Guard        Action
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ScreenOff       ScreenOff       pressButton   powerLow     displayLowPowerMessage  
ScreenOff       ScreenOn        pressButton   !powerLow
ScreenOn        ScreenOff       pressButton
ScreenOff       ScreenCharging  plugPower
ScreenOn        ScreenCharging  plugPower
ScreenCharging  ScreenOff       unplugPower

Comparison

Nested switch keeps all the logic in one spot, but the code can be hard to read when there are a lot of states and transitions. It's possibly more secure and easier to validate than the other approaches (no polymorphism or interpreting).

The State pattern implementation potentially spreads the logic over several separate classes, which may make understanding it as a whole a problem. On the other hand, the small classes are easy to understand separately. The design is particularly fragile if you change the behavior by adding or removing transitions, as they're methods in the hierarchy and there could be lots of changes to the code. If you live by the design principle of small interfaces, you'll see this pattern doesn't really do so well. However, if the state machine is stable, then such changes won't be needed.

The state tables approach requires writing some kind of interpreter for the content (this might be easier if you have reflection in the language you're using), which could be a lot of work to do up front. As Fowler points out, if your table is separate from your code, you could modify the behavior of your software without recompiling. This has some security implications, however; the software is behaving based on the contents of an external file.

Edit (not really for C language)

There is a fluent interface (aka internal Domain Specific Language) approach, too, which is probably facilitated by languages that have first-class functions. The Stateless library exists and that blog shows a simple example with code. A Java implementation (pre Java8) is discussed. I was shown a Python example on GitHub as well.

3

For simple cases, you can you your switch style method. What I have found that works well in the past is to deal with transitions too:

static int current_state;    // should always hold current state -- and probably be an enum or something

void state_leave(int new_state) {
    // do processing on what it means to enter the new state
    // which might be dependent on the current state
}

void state_enter(int new_state) {
    // do processing on what is means to leave the current atate
    // might be dependent on the new state

    current_state = new_state;
}

void state_process() {
    // switch statement to handle current state
}

I don't know anything about the boost library, but this type of approach is dead simple, doesn't require any external dependencies, and is easy to implement.

3

I found a really slick C implementation of Moore FSM on the edx.org course Embedded Systems - Shape the World UTAustinX - UT.6.02x, chapter 10, by Jonathan Valvano and Ramesh Yerraballi....

struct State {
  unsigned long Out;  // 6-bit pattern to output
  unsigned long Time; // delay in 10ms units 
  unsigned long Next[4]; // next state for inputs 0,1,2,3
}; 

typedef const struct State STyp;

//this example has 4 states, defining constants/symbols using #define
#define goN   0
#define waitN 1
#define goE   2
#define waitE 3


//this is the full FSM logic coded into one large array of output values, delays, 
//and next states (indexed by values of the inputs)
STyp FSM[4]={
 {0x21,3000,{goN,waitN,goN,waitN}}, 
 {0x22, 500,{goE,goE,goE,goE}},
 {0x0C,3000,{goE,goE,waitE,waitE}},
 {0x14, 500,{goN,goN,goN,goN}}};
unsigned long currentState;  // index to the current state 

//super simple controller follows
int main(void){ volatile unsigned long delay;
//embedded micro-controller configuration omitteed [...]
  currentState = goN;  
  while(1){
    LIGHTS = FSM[currentState].Out;  // set outputs lines (from FSM table)
    SysTick_Wait10ms(FSM[currentState].Time);
    currentState = FSM[currentState].Next[INPUT_SENSORS];  
  }
}
2

You might want to look into the libero FSM generator software. From a state description language and/or a (windows) state diagram editor you may generate code for C, C++, java and many others ... plus nice documentation and diagrams. Source and binaries from iMatix

2

This article is a good one for the state pattern (though it is C++, not specifically C).

If you can put your hands on the book "Head First Design Patterns", the explanation and example are very clear.

2

One of my favourite patterns is the state design pattern. Respond or behave differently to the same given set of inputs.
One of the problems with using switch/case statements for state machines is that as you create more states, the switch/cases becomes harder/unwieldy to read/maintain, promotes unorganized spaghetti code, and increasingly difficult to change without breaking something. I find using design patterns helps me to organize my data better, which is the whole point of abstraction. Instead of designing your state code around what state you came from, instead structure your code so that it records the state when you enter a new state. That way, you effectively get a record of your previous state. I like @JoshPetit's answer, and have taken his solution one step further, taken straight from the GoF book:

stateCtxt.h:

#define STATE (void *)
typedef enum fsmSignal
{
   eEnter =0,
   eNormal,
   eExit
}FsmSignalT;

typedef struct fsm 
{
   FsmSignalT signal;
   // StateT is an enum that you can define any which way you want
   StateT currentState;
}FsmT;
extern int STATECTXT_Init(void);
/* optionally allow client context to set the target state */
extern STATECTXT_Set(StateT  stateID);
extern void STATECTXT_Handle(void *pvEvent);

stateCtxt.c:

#include "stateCtxt.h"
#include "statehandlers.h"

typedef STATE (*pfnStateT)(FsmSignalT signal, void *pvEvent);

static FsmT      fsm;
static pfnStateT UsbState ;

int STATECTXT_Init(void)
{    
    UsbState = State1;
    fsm.signal = eEnter;
    // use an enum for better maintainability
    fsm.currentState = '1';
    (*UsbState)( &fsm, pvEvent);
    return 0;
}

static void ChangeState( FsmT *pFsm, pfnStateT targetState )
{
    // Check to see if the state has changed
    if (targetState  != NULL)
    {
        // Call current state's exit event
        pFsm->signal = eExit;
        STATE dummyState = (*UsbState)( pFsm, pvEvent);

        // Update the State Machine structure
        UsbState = targetState ;

        // Call the new state's enter event
        pFsm->signal = eEnter;            
        dummyState = (*UsbState)( pFsm, pvEvent);
    }
}

void STATECTXT_Handle(void *pvEvent)
{
    pfnStateT newState;

    if (UsbState != NULL)
    {
         fsm.signal = eNormal;
         newState = (*UsbState)( &fsm, pvEvent );
         ChangeState( &fsm, newState );
    }        
}


void STATECTXT_Set(StateT  stateID)
{
     prevState = UsbState;
     switch (stateID) 
     {
         case '1':               
            ChangeState( State1 );
            break;
          case '2':
            ChangeState( State2);
            break;
          case '3':
            ChangeState( State3);
            break;
     }
}

statehandlers.h:

/* define state handlers */
extern STATE State1(void);
extern STATE State2(void);
extern STATE State3(void);

statehandlers.c:

#include "stateCtxt.h:"

/* Define behaviour to given set of inputs */
STATE State1(FsmT *fsm, void *pvEvent)
{   
    STATE nextState;
    /* do some state specific behaviours 
     * here
     */
    /* fsm->currentState currently contains the previous state
     * just before it gets updated, so you can implement behaviours 
     * which depend on previous state here
     */
    fsm->currentState = '1';
    /* Now, specify the next state
     * to transition to, or return null if you're still waiting for 
     * more stuff to process.  
     */
    switch (fsm->signal)
    {
        case eEnter:
            nextState = State2;
            break;
        case eNormal:
            nextState = null;
            break;
        case eExit:
            nextState = State2;
            break;
    }

    return nextState;
}

STATE  State3(FsmT *fsm, void *pvEvent)
{
    /* do some state specific behaviours 
     * here
     */
    fsm->currentState = '2';
    /* Now, specify the next state
     * to transition to
     */
     return State1;
}

STATE   State2(FsmT *fsm, void *pvEvent)
{   
    /* do some state specific behaviours 
     * here
     */
    fsm->currentState = '3';
    /* Now, specify the next state
     * to transition to
     */
     return State3;
}

For most State Machines, esp. Finite state machines, each state will know what its next state should be, and the criteria for transitioning to its next state. For loose state designs, this may not be the case, hence the option to expose the API for transitioning states. If you desire more abstraction, each state handler can be separated out into its own file, which are equivalent to the concrete state handlers in the GoF book. If your design is simple with only a few states, then both stateCtxt.c and statehandlers.c can be combined into a single file for simplicity.

  • State3 and State2 have return values even though declared void. – Ant Mar 19 '14 at 10:15
  • good catch, I've updated my answer, thanks – Phileo99 Mar 19 '14 at 19:06
1

In my experience using the 'switch' statement is the standard way to handle multiple possible states. Although I am surpirsed that you are passing in a transition value to the per-state processing. I thought the whole point of a state machine was that each state performed a single action. Then the next action/input determines which new state to transition into. So I would have expected each state processing function to immediately perform whatever is fixed for entering state and then afterwards decide if transition is needed to another state.

  • 2
    There are different underlying models: Mealy machines and Moore machines. Mealy's actions depend on the transition, Moore's ones depend on the state. – xmjx Sep 25 '08 at 13:38
1

There is a book titled Practical Statecharts in C/C++. However, it is way too heavyweight for what we need.

  • 2
    I had the exact same reaction to the book. How can 700+ pages be needed to describe & implement something that I think is pretty intuitive & straightforward?!?!? – Dan Mar 18 '09 at 17:58
1

For compiler which support __COUNTER__ , you can use them for simple (but large) state mashines.

  #define START 0      
  #define END 1000

  int run = 1;
  state = START;    
  while(run)
  {
    switch (state)
    {
        case __COUNTER__:
            //do something
            state++;
            break;
        case __COUNTER__:
            //do something
            if (input)
               state = END;
            else
               state++;
            break;
            .
            .
            .
        case __COUNTER__:
            //do something
            if (input)
               state = START;
            else
               state++;
            break;
        case __COUNTER__:
            //do something
            state++;
            break;
        case END:
            //do something
            run = 0;
            state = START;
            break;
        default:
            state++;
            break;
     } 
  } 

The advantage of using __COUNTER__ instead of hard coded numbers is that you can add states in the middle of other states, without renumbering everytime everything. If the compiler doesnt support __COUNTER__, in a limited way its posible to use with precaution __LINE__

  • Could you please explain more your answer? – abarisone Mar 20 '15 at 8:39
  • In a normal "switch" state mashine, you have e.g. case 0, case 1, case 2, ... case 100. If you now want to add 3 cases between 5 and 6, you have to renumber the rest to 100, which now would be 103. The use of __COUNTER__eliminates the need to renumber, because the precompiler does the numbering during compilation. – Seb Mar 20 '15 at 9:24
0

In C++, consider the State pattern.

  • I'm wondering if there's a way to mimic the state pattern in C... – Thomas Owens Sep 25 '08 at 13:26
0

Your question is similar to "is there a typical Data Base implementation pattern"? The answer depends upon what do you want to achieve? If you want to implement a larger deterministic state machine you may use a model and a state machine generator. Examples can be viewed at www.StateSoft.org - SM Gallery. Janusz Dobrowolski

0

In C, for simple machines something like this is what I usually end up using.

The event-driven FSM is described by state objects (FsmState) associated with an action (FsmAction), and transitions (FsmEdge) defined by current state and events.

It also provides storing and passing both FSM and user data, to separate FSM-bound and user-bound information and allow multiple instances of the same FSM (i.e. using the same description but passing different user data).

Events are represented by an integer type (FsmEvent). Negative values are reserved by the implementation to allow special common events (Reset, None, Any, Empty, End). Non-negative events are user defined.

For simplicity, transitions are listed in an array and matching is attempted in the array order, essentially providing transition priorities. They have optional guard functions. The next state can either be indicated directly in the transition list or by a jump function, this way providing more flexibility enabling dynamic FSM behavior.

In transitions descriptions, A NULL current state will match any state and a wildcard event (Any) will match any event. Anyway, the actual value of the event that triggered the transition will be passed to the jump and guard functions.

For complex FSMs, the simple edge array solution may become too inefficient. In that case, a proper jump function could be implemented using the edge array and event entries converted into a transition matrix or state adjacency lists.

State actions are meant to be implemented with a reentrant function which discriminates between state entry (Enter), state exit (Leave) and in-state (State) operations. In this way local state information can be encapsulated and preserved with static function variables.

Normally, state entry and exit actions will execute unremarkably and return no new events (None). If not, the new event is trapped and returned immediately. This will effectively prevent a transition in case it happens when exiting the current state.

The FSM step function (fsmStep) will perform a single step of the FSM, using a new event to trigger a transition, or no event (None) to execute the in-state action of the current state. The step function returns a new emitted event that can be handled or re-fed to the FSM; or None, Empty and End in case of no event, transition not found or end state reached, respectively.

#ifndef FSM_H_
#define FSM_H_

#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdint.h>

/** FSM enum type */
typedef enum
{
    // Events and return values
    fsm_User = 0, ///< User events start with this id
    fsm_Reset = -1, ///< Reset event
    fsm_None = -2, ///< No event
    fsm_Any = -3, ///< Any event, used as a wildcard
    fsm_Empty = -4, ///< No transition found for event
    fsm_End = -5, ///< Final state event generated when FSM reaches end state, or stop processing when used in transition

    // Action types
    fsm_Enter = 0, ///< Entry action
    fsm_State, ///< In-state action
    fsm_Leave ///< Exit action
} fsm_e;

typedef int FsmEvent; ///< Type for events
typedef struct FsmState FsmState; ///< Type for states
typedef struct FsmEdge FsmEdge; ///< Type for edges (transitions)

/** State action functor
    @param state Pointer to this state
    @param type Action type (Enter/State/Leave)
    @param frto Pointer to from(Enter)/to(Leave) state, NULL otherwise
    @param data User data
    @return Event id in case of a new triggered event, fsm_None otherwise
*/
typedef FsmEvent (*FsmAction)(FsmState *state, fsm_e type, FsmState *frto, void *data);

/** FSM state object */
struct FsmState
{
    FsmAction action; ///< Per-state action
    void *data; ///< Per-state data
};

/** State jump functor
    @param edge Pointer to this edge
    @param state Pointer to the actual current state
    @param event Event id that triggered the transition
    @param data User data
    @return Pointer to the next state and NULL for end state
*/
typedef FsmState *(*FsmJump)(FsmEdge *edge, FsmState *state, FsmEvent event, void *data);

/** Guard function
    @param edge Pointer to this edge
    @param state Pointer to the actual current state
    @param event Event id that triggered the transition
    @param data User data
    @return Guard result
*/
typedef bool (*FsmGuard)(FsmEdge *edge, FsmState *state, FsmEvent event, void *data);

/** FSM edge transition */
struct FsmEdge
{
    FsmState *state; ///< Matching current state pointer, or NULL to match any state
    FsmEvent event; ///< Matching event id or fsm_Any for wildcard
    void *next; ///< Next state pointer (FsmState *) or jump function (FsmJump)
    FsmGuard guard; ///< Transition guard function
    void *data; ///< Per-edge data
};

typedef struct Fsm Fsm;
struct Fsm
{
    FsmState *state; ///< Pointer to the state array
    size_t states; ///< Number of states
    void **stateData; ///< Pointer to user state data array

    FsmEdge *edge; ///< Pointer to the edge transitions array
    size_t edges; ///< Number of edges
    void **edgeData; ///< Pointer to user edge data array

    FsmEvent event; ///< Current/last event
    fsm_e type; ///< Current/last action type

    FsmState *current; ///< Pointer to the current state
    void *data; ///< Per-fsm data
};

#define fsm_INIT { 0 }

static inline FsmEvent
fsmStep(Fsm *f, FsmEvent e)
{
    FsmState *cp = f->current; // Store current state
    FsmEvent ne = fsm_None; // Next event

    // User state data
    void *us = (f->stateData && cp) ? f->stateData[cp - f->state] : NULL;

    if (!cp && e == fsm_None)
        e = fsm_Reset; // Inject reset into uninitialized FSM

    f->event = e;

    switch (e)
    {
    case fsm_Reset:
        {
            // Exit current state
            if (cp && cp->action)
            {
                f->type = fsm_Leave, ne = cp->action(cp, fsm_Leave, f->state, us);

                if (ne != fsm_None)
                    return ne; // Leave action emitted event
            }

            FsmState *ps = cp;
            cp = f->current = f->state; // First state in array is entry state

            if (!cp)
                return fsm_End; // Null state machine

            if (cp->action)
            {
                us = f->stateData ? f->stateData[0] : NULL;
                f->type = fsm_Enter, ne = cp->action(cp, fsm_Enter, ps, us);
            }
        }
        break;

    case fsm_None: // No event, run in-state action
        if (cp->action)
            f->type = fsm_State, ne = cp->action(cp, fsm_State, NULL, us);
        break;

    default: // Process user transition event
        ne = fsm_Empty; // Default return in case no transition is found

        // Search transition in listing order
        for (size_t i = 0; i < f->edges; ++i)
        {
            FsmEdge *ep = &f->edge[i];

            // Check for state match (null edge state matches any state)
            if (ep->state && ep->state != cp)
                continue; // Not a match

            // Check for stop processing filter
            if (ep->event == fsm_End)
                break;

            ne = fsm_None; // Default return for a transition

            // Check for event match
            if (ep->event == e || ep->event == fsm_Any)
            {
                // User edge data
                void *ue = f->edgeData ? f->edgeData[i] : NULL;

                // Check transition guard
                if (!ep->guard || ep->guard(ep, cp, e, ue))
                {
                    // Resolve next state pointer (NULL, new state pointer or jump function)
                    FsmState *np = (!ep->next) ? NULL
                        : ((FsmState *)(ep->next) >= f->state && (FsmState *)(ep->next) < (f->state + f->states)) ? (FsmState *)(ep->next)
                        : ((FsmJump)(ep->next))(ep, cp, e, ue);

                    if (cp->action)
                    {
                        f->type = fsm_Leave, ne = cp->action(cp, fsm_Leave, np, us);

                        if (ne != fsm_None)
                            return ne; // Leave action emitted event
                    }

                    if (!np) // Final state reached if next state is NULL
                        ne = fsm_End;
                    else if (np->action)
                    {
                        us = f->stateData ? f->stateData[np - f->state] : NULL;
                        f->type = fsm_Enter, ne = np->action(np, fsm_Enter, cp, us);
                    }

                    cp = np; // New state value

                    // Transition executed, stop
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    f->current = cp; // Commit current state

    return ne; // Last event value
}

static inline FsmEvent
fsmReset(Fsm *f)
{
    return fsmStep(f, fsm_Reset);
}

#endif // FSM_H_

Below there is a very simple test to get the idea on how to define and use the FSM implementation. There are no user-defined events, only FSM data (strings), the same state action for every state and a shared jump function:

#include <stdio.h>

#include "fsm.h"

// State action example
static FsmEvent
state_action(FsmState *s, fsm_e t, FsmState *ft, void *us)
{
    FsmEvent e = fsm_None; // State event
    const char *q = "?";

    switch (t)
    {
    case fsm_Enter:
        q = "enter";
        break;

    case fsm_Leave:
        q = "leave";
        break;

    default /* fsm_State */:
        q = "state";
    }

    printf("%s %s\n", (const char *)s->data, q);

    return e;
}

// States
FsmState fs[] =
{
    { state_action, "S0" },
    { state_action, "S1" },
    { state_action, "S2" },
};

// Transition jump example
static FsmState *
state_jump(FsmEdge *t, FsmState *s, FsmEvent e, void *ue)
{
    if (s == &fs[0])
        return &fs[1];

    if (s == &fs[2])
        return NULL; // End state

    return NULL; // Trap
}

// Transition guard example
static bool
count_attempt(FsmEdge *t, FsmState *s, FsmEvent e, void *ue)
{
    static int c = 0;
    ++c;
    bool b = c == 3;
    printf("guard is %s\n", b ? "true" : "false");
    return b;
}

// Transitions
FsmEdge fe[] =
{
    { &fs[0], fsm_Any, state_jump }, // Using jump function, no guard
    { &fs[1], fsm_Any, &fs[2], count_attempt }, // Using direct state and guard
    { &fs[2], fsm_Any, state_jump  }, // Using jump function, no guard
};

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Fsm f = { fs, 3, NULL, fe, 3, NULL, };

    fsmReset(&f);

    do 
    {
        fsmStep(&f, fsm_None);
    } while (fsmStep(&f, fsm_Any) != fsm_End);

    return 0;
}
-1

Boost has the statechart library. http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_36_0/libs/statechart/doc/index.html

I can't speak to the use of it, though. Not used it myself (yet)

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