45

I want to display an expandable div (width: 100%) with margins...

Here is my code :

<div id="page">
    <div id="margin">
        "some content here"
    </div>
</div>​

And here is my css code :

#page {
  background: red;
  float: left;
  width: 100%;
  height: 300px;
}

#margin {
  background: green;
  float: left;
  width: 100%;
  height: 300px;
  margin: 10px;
}​

LIVE DEMO

closed as unclear what you're asking by TylerH, Makyen, Stephen Kennedy, Mark Rotteveel, ekad Dec 2 '18 at 9:52

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11

You can use the following CSS to achieve the desired result:

#page {
   background: red;
   overflow: auto;
}

#margin {
   background: green;
   height: 280px;
   margin: 10px
}
  • 6
    Ah! The trick is not having width: 100% on the #margin. – MSC Mar 9 '16 at 1:43
  • 2
    Completely removing the width doesn't seem like the appropriate way to solve the problem of combining margin and width functionality. – user7733611 Nov 30 '17 at 20:10
67

You can use calc() css function (browser support).

#page {
  background: red;
  float: left;
  width: 100%;
  height: 300px;
}

#margin {
  background: green;
  float: left;
  width: -moz-calc(100% - 10px);
  width: -webkit-calc(100% - 10px);
  width: -o-calc(100% - 10px);
  width: calc(100% - 10px);
  height: 300px;
  margin: 10px;
}​

Alternatively, try using padding instead of margin and box-sizing: border-box (browser support):

#page {
    background: red;
    width: 100%;
    height: 300px;
    padding: 10px;
}

#margin {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    background: green;
    width: 100%;
    height: 300px;
}
  • 1
    The best solution is to use calc() in modern browsers, and JS code + Modernizr for older browser which doesn't support calc(). – Vukašin Manojlović Nov 10 '12 at 14:27
  • Css function ? thats sound great... but i use chrome and chrome tell me "invalid property value"... but why ? – Random78952 Nov 10 '12 at 14:32
  • 4
    You have to use calc(100% - 10px) (space between number and minus). Also for chrome and safari use -webkit prefix, -moz for FF and -o for Opera! – Vukašin Manojlović Nov 10 '12 at 14:39
  • If you want to be cross-browser compatible, this probably is not the best approach. Since often users don't have to latest and greatest browser... – Andy Nov 10 '12 at 15:00
  • Why isn't this calc(100% - 20px)? 10px would only be one side of the margin and would only reduce the width by half the required distance to fit. Unless I'm missing something. – Mark Carpenter Jr Feb 9 '18 at 19:29
14

Sometimes it's better to do the opposite and give the parent div padding instead:

LIVE DEMO

What I did was change the CSS of #page to:

#page {
    padding: 3%;
    width: 94%; /* 94% + 3% +3% = 100% */

    /* keep the rest of your css */
    /* ... */
}

Then delete the margin from #margin

Note: this also adds 3% to the top and bottom (so 6% to the height) which makes it a little taller than 300px - so if you need exactly 300px, you could do something like padding:10px 3%; and change the height:280px; to add up to 300px again.

  • 1
    This is the right approach for doing calculations with CSS for now. This illustrates the basic principle that you end up with a div structure that mimic the parse tree of the expression you want to evaluate. – eh9 Nov 10 '12 at 14:27
4

For LESS users only:

Using the nice solution of Vukašin Manojlović doesn't work out of the box because LESS executes + or - operations during the LESS compilation. One solution is to escape LESS so that it doesn't execute the operation.

Disable LESS-CSS Overwriting calc()

@someMarginVariable = 15px;

margin: @someMarginVariable;
width: calc(~"100% - "@someMarginVariable*2);
width: -moz-calc(~"100% - "@someMarginVariable*2);
width: -webkit-calc(~"100% - "@someMarginVariable*2);
width: -o-calc(~"100% - "@someMarginVariable*2);

or can use a mixin like:

.fullWidthMinusMarginPaddingMixin(@marginSize,@paddingSize) {
  @minusValue: (@marginSize+@paddingSize)*2;
  padding: @paddingSize;
  margin: @marginSize;
  width: calc(~"100% - "@minusValue);
  width: -moz-calc(~"100% - "@minusValue);
  width: -webkit-calc(~"100% - "@minusValue);
  width: -o-calc(~"100% - "@minusValue);
}
1

The correct way to achieve this by standard is:

#margin {
   background: green;
   height: 280px;
   margin: 10px;
   width: auto;
   display: block;
}
  • +1 As width: auto worked like a charm compared to width: 100%. Having googled the difference I'm not sure why anybody would use 100%. If they know what they're doing. Which I certainly don't. – Josh Jun 8 '18 at 16:41
  • There is no "correct" way, and this question goes beyond elements which are display:block by default (like tables for example), therefor this solution is lacking. – vsync Aug 15 '18 at 12:21
1

If possible, try to use padding with box-sizing instead, on #page element

#page {
    padding: 10px;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    background: red;
    float: left;
    width: 100%;
    height: 300px;
}
#margin {
    background: green;
    float: left;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

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