123
-(NSDate *)beginningOfDay:(NSDate *)date
{
    NSCalendar *cal = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
    NSDateComponents *components = [cal components:( NSMonthCalendarUnit | NSYearCalendarUnit | NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit ) fromDate:date];
    
    [components setHour:0];
    [components setMinute:0];
    [components setSecond:0];
    
    return [cal dateFromComponents:components];
    
}

-(NSDate *)endOfDay:(NSDate *)date
{
    NSCalendar *cal = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
    NSDateComponents *components = [cal components:(  NSMonthCalendarUnit | NSYearCalendarUnit | NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit ) fromDate:date];
    
    [components setHour:23];
    [components setMinute:59];
    [components setSecond:59];
    
    return [cal dateFromComponents:components];

}

When I call : [self endOfDay:[NSDate date]]; I get the first of the month ... Why is that? I use this two methods because I need an interval that is from the first second of the first date (beginningOfDay:date1) to the last second of the second date (endOfDay:Date2) ...

2
  • 2
    If you want to set the hours to zero UTC time, an easier way it to get the timeIntervalSince..., truncate the hours, and then convert back to NSDate. And this will work for another timezone if you first adjust the time interval by the timezone's secondsFromGMT, then adjust the opposite way after truncating. (End of day is obviously 23:59:59.999 later, which can be gotten with simple addition while you have the time interval.)
    – Hot Licks
    Nov 10, 2012 at 18:23
  • Specifying "end of day" as some arbitrary time before its actual end (one second in this case) seem like a recipe for glitchy software. If you use 1 ms, the glitches will be less frequent. Or you could use 23 hours so that any bugs are more likely to be caught. :-) Aug 4, 2020 at 3:05

25 Answers 25

257

Start Of Day / End Of Day — Swift 4

  // Extension

extension Date {
    var startOfDay: Date {
        return Calendar.current.startOfDay(for: self)
    }

    var endOfDay: Date {
        var components = DateComponents()
        components.day = 1
        components.second = -1
        return Calendar.current.date(byAdding: components, to: startOfDay)!
    }

    var startOfMonth: Date {
        let components = Calendar.current.dateComponents([.year, .month], from: startOfDay)
        return Calendar.current.date(from: components)!
    }

    var endOfMonth: Date {
        var components = DateComponents()
        components.month = 1
        components.second = -1
        return Calendar.current.date(byAdding: components, to: startOfMonth)!
    }
}

// End of day = Start of tomorrow minus 1 second
// End of month = Start of next month minus 1 second
7
  • 1
    NSYearCalendarUnit, NSMonthCalendarUnit, and NSDayCalendarUnit have been deprecated as of iOS 8. Use NSCalendarUnitYear, NSCalendarUnitMonth, and NSCalendarUnitDay instead!
    – T Blank
    Aug 12, 2015 at 0:08
  • 6
    For start of day, use [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] startOfDayForDate:...] for iOS8+ Sep 4, 2015 at 15:44
  • 6
    This returns the startOfDay in the current timezone! NSDate is expected to be in UTC but this converter returns a the time corrected for the default timezone. Sep 5, 2016 at 0:17
  • 4
    Why endOfDay is optional? Are there any situations where startOfDay is not nil, while endOfDay could be nil? Jun 1, 2017 at 14:25
  • 2
    So, depending on how you use this you mind one second gaps between the ends and beginnings of days developer.apple.com/documentation/foundation/nsdate/…
    – atlex2
    Dec 11, 2019 at 1:53
40

Swift 5 Simple and more precise answer.

Start time: 00:00:00

End time: 23:59:59.5

let date = Date() // current date or replace with a specific date
let calendar = Calendar.current
let startTime = calendar.startOfDay(for: date)
let endTime = calendar.date(bySettingHour: 23, minute: 59, second: 59, of: date)

Extra

let yesterday = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: -1, to: noon)!
let tomorrow = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: 1, to: noon)!
let specificDate = Date("2020-01-01")

extension Date {
    init(_ dateString:String) {
        let dateStringFormatter = DateFormatter()
        dateStringFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd"
        dateStringFormatter.locale = NSLocale(localeIdentifier: "en_US_POSIX") as Locale
        let date = dateStringFormatter.date(from: dateString)!
        self.init(timeInterval:0, since:date)
    }
}
3
  • 2
    How is this different from let dateAtEnd = Calendar.current.date(bySettingHour: 23, minute: 59, second: 59, of: Date())? Jun 28, 2018 at 12:00
  • 1
    No Difference .
    – August Lin
    Jul 2, 2018 at 17:14
  • is it possible that endTime is nil if the date doesn't have the time 23:59:59?
    – sktree
    Apr 14 at 8:18
35

You are missing NSDayCalendarUnit in

NSDateComponents *components = [cal components:( NSMonthCalendarUnit | NSYearCalendarUnit | NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit ) fromDate:date];
3
  • 2
    I have a strange behaviour where if I add the day component I get 23:00 of the previous day.
    – Mike M
    Jul 18, 2014 at 10:24
  • 5
    @Mike use timezone: components.timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithName:@"GMT"];
    – dimaxyu
    Dec 17, 2014 at 12:08
  • @dimaxyu is right. In swift its: components.timeZone = NSTimeZone(name: "GMT") Sep 5, 2016 at 0:45
32

In iOS 8+ this is really convenient; you can do:

let startOfDay: Date = Calendar.current.startOfDay(for: Date())

To get the end of day then just use the Calendar methods for 23 hours, 59 mins, 59 seconds, depending on how you define end of day.

// Swift 5.0
let components = DateComponents(hour: 23, minute: 59, second: 59)
let endOfDay = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: components, to: startOfDay)

Date Math

Apple iOS NSCalendar Documentation. (See Section: Calendrical Calculations)

NSCalendar methods discussed by NSHipster.

0
17

My Swift extensions for NSDate:

Swift 1.2

extension NSDate {

    func beginningOfDay() -> NSDate {
        var calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
        var components = calendar.components(.CalendarUnitYear | .CalendarUnitMonth | .CalendarUnitDay, fromDate: self)
        return calendar.dateFromComponents(components)!
    }

    func endOfDay() -> NSDate {
        var components = NSDateComponents()
        components.day = 1
        var date = NSCalendar.currentCalendar().dateByAddingComponents(components, toDate: self.beginningOfDay(), options: .allZeros)!
        date = date.dateByAddingTimeInterval(-1)!
        return date
    }
}

Swift 2.0

extension NSDate {

    func beginningOfDay() -> NSDate {
        let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
        let components = calendar.components([.Year, .Month, .Day], fromDate: self)
        return calendar.dateFromComponents(components)!
    }

    func endOfDay() -> NSDate {
        let components = NSDateComponents()
        components.day = 1
        var date = NSCalendar.currentCalendar().dateByAddingComponents(components, toDate: self.beginningOfDay(), options: [])!
        date = date.dateByAddingTimeInterval(-1)
        return date
    }
}
2
  • You can just set second to -1 and get the same without using dateByAddingTimeInterval
    – pronebird
    Apr 17, 2016 at 15:36
  • to avoid timezone issues add: components.timeZone = NSTimeZone(name: "GMT") Sep 5, 2016 at 0:45
17

Swift 5.1 - XCode 11 with Date class instead of NSDate and Calender instead of NSCalender

extension Date {

    var startOfDay : Date {
        let calendar = Calendar.current
        let unitFlags = Set<Calendar.Component>([.year, .month, .day])
        let components = calendar.dateComponents(unitFlags, from: self)
        return calendar.date(from: components)!
   }

    var endOfDay : Date {
        var components = DateComponents()
        components.day = 1
        let date = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: components, to: self.startOfDay)
        return (date?.addingTimeInterval(-1))!
    }
}

Usage:

    let myDate = Date()
    let startOfDate = myDate.startOfDay
    let endOfDate = myDate.endOfDay
3
  • I am getting the error undeclared type Date when I try it in the playground
    – John Doe
    Oct 23, 2016 at 7:05
  • 1
    It's working for me here. Did you import UIKit with import UIKit?
    – Ben
    Nov 22, 2016 at 10:04
  • 2
    @Ben Date and Calendar is not in UIKit, its in Foundation, however UIKit imports Foundation
    – Arbitur
    Dec 17, 2018 at 11:10
11

I think the most succinct way to do this in Swift is as follows:

extension Date {
    func startOfDay() -> Date {
        return Calendar.current.startOfDay(for: self)
    }
    func endOfDay() -> Date {
        return Calendar.current.date(bySettingHour: 23, minute: 59, second: 59, of: self) ?? self
    }
}
1
  • Thats perfect! Thx!
    – Baran Emre
    Jun 10, 2020 at 9:55
6

In Swift 3 and above

extension Date {
    var startOfDayDate: Date {
        return Calendar.current.startOfDay(for: self)
    }

    var endOfDayDate: Date {
        let nextDayDate = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: 1, to: self.startOfDayDate)!
        return nextDayDate.addingTimeInterval(-1)
    }
}

Usage:

var currentDayStart = Date().startOfDayDate
var currentDayEnd = Date().endOfDayDate
5

For me none of the answers here and else where on stackoverflow worked. To get start of today i did this.

NSCalendar * gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSCalendarIdentifierGregorian]; 
[gregorian setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0]];    
NSDateComponents *components = [gregorian components:NSCalendarUnitYear|NSCalendarUnitMonth|NSCalendarUnitDay fromDate:[NSDate date]]; 
[components setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0]]; 
NSDate *beginningOfToday = [gregorian dateFromComponents:components];

Note this [gregorian setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0]]; and [components setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0]];.

When a calendar is created it gets initialised with current timezone and when date is extracted from its components, since NSDate has no timezone, the date from current timezone is considered as UTC timezone. So we need to set the timezone before extracting components and later when extracting date from these components.

4

You don't have to set up the components to zero, just ignore them:

-(NSDate *)beginningOfDay:(NSDate *)date
{
    NSCalendar *calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
    NSDateComponents *components = [calendar components:NSYearCalendarUnit | NSMonthCalendarUnit | NSDayCalendarUnit fromDate:date];
    return [calendar dateFromComponents:components];
}
1
  • 3
    "Newly" available: [calendar startOfDayForDate:date], but there is no -endOfDayForDate:, unfortunately... Nov 25, 2016 at 0:29
4

Swift 3

  class func today() -> NSDate {
        return NSDate()
    }

    class func dayStart() -> NSDate {
          return NSCalendar.current.startOfDay(for: NSDate() as Date) as NSDate
    }

    class func dayEnd() -> NSDate {
        let components = NSDateComponents()
        components.day = 1
        components.second = -1
        return NSCalendar.current.date(byAdding: components as DateComponents, to: self.dayStart() as Date)
    }
4

Swift3 Using *XCode8
Apple is removing the NS from the class name so that NSDate can be swapped out to Date. You may get a compiler warning if you try to cast them saying they will always fail, but they work fine when you run them in the playground.

I replaced my generated NSDate in core data model with Date and they still work.

extension Date {
  func startTime() -> Date {
    return Calendar.current.startOfDay(for: self)
  }

  func endTime() -> Date {
    var components = DateComponents()
    components.day = 1
    components.second = -1
    return Calendar.current.date(byAdding: components, to: startTime())!
  }
}
3

Objective-C

NSCalendar * calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
NSDate * startDate = [calendar startOfDayForDate:[NSDate date]];
NSLog(@"start date is %@", startDate);
2

One more way to get result:

NSDate *date = [NSDate date];

NSDateComponents *components = [[NSDateComponents alloc] init];
components.day = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] ordinalityOfUnit:(NSCalendarUnitDay) inUnit:(NSCalendarUnitEra) forDate:date];
NSDate *dayBegin = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] dateFromComponents:components];

components.day += 1;
NSDate *dayEnd = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] dateFromComponents:components];
2

You are missing NSDayCalendarUnit in the components.

2

For swift 4

    var calendar = Calendar.current
    calendar.timeZone = NSTimeZone(abbreviation: "UTC")! as TimeZone
    let dateAtMidnight = calendar.startOfDay(for: Date())

    //For End Date
    var components = DateComponents()
    components.day = 1
    components.second = -1

    let dateAtEnd = calendar.date(byAdding: components, to: dateAtMidnight)

    print("dateAtMidnight :: \(dateAtMidnight)")
    print("dateAtEnd :: \(dateAtEnd!)")
2

In Swift 5.3, both Calendar.current.startOfDay() and Calendar.current.date(bySettingHour:, minute:, second:, of:) are timezone specific. If you want your date to normalize to the same time regardless of timezone, you should use GMT time like this.

// Normalize time of aDate to 12:00 GMT
let aDate = Date()
let twelveGMT = 12 + TimeZone.current.secondsFromGMT() / 3600
let normalizedDate = Calendar.current.date(bySettingHour: twelveGMT, minute: 0, second: 0, of: aDate)
2

Updating @Zelko's Answer to get the calendar:

extension Date {

    func startOfDay(in calendar: Calendar = .current) -> Date {
        calendar.startOfDay(for: self)
    }

    func endOfDay(in calendar: Calendar = .current) -> Date {
        var components = DateComponents()
        components.day = 1
        components.second = -1
        return calendar.date(byAdding: components, to: startOfDay(in: calendar))!
    }

    func startOfMonth(in calendar: Calendar = .current) -> Date {
        let components = calendar.dateComponents([.year, .month], from: startOfDay(in: calendar))
        return calendar.date(from: components)!
    }

    func endOfMonth(in calendar: Calendar = .current) -> Date {
        var components = DateComponents()
        components.month = 1
        components.second = -1
        return calendar.date(byAdding: components, to: startOfMonth(in: calendar))!
    }
}

Note:

It is very important to use the correct calendar when your app supports more regions

1

Since iOS 8.0+ / macOS 10.12+ / tvOS 10.0+ / watchOS 3.0+ there is a built in function in the Foundation, which you can use out of the box. No need to implement own functions.

public func startOfDay(for date: Date) -> Date

So you can use it this way:

let midnightDate = Calendar(identifier: .gregorian).startOfDay(for: Date())

It's worth to remember, that this takes upon consideration the device time zone. You can set .timeZone on calendar if you want to have eg UTC zone.

Link to the Apple reference pages: https://developer.apple.com/reference/foundation/nscalendar/1417161-startofday.

1

This is what I use for Swift 4.2:

    let calendar = Calendar.current
    let fromDate = calendar.startOfDay(for: Date())
    let endDate = calendar.date(bySettingHour: 23, minute: 59, second: 59, of: Date())

Works like a charm for me. You could add this to an extension for start and end dates on Date, however keep in mind that adding an extension increases compile time (unless in the same file as the class), so if you only need it at one place or in one class... don't use an extension.

1

Just another way using dateInterval(of:start:interval:for:) of Calendar and the dedicated DateInterval struct

On return startDate contains the start of the day and interval the number of seconds in the day.

func dateInterval(of date : Date) -> DateInterval {
    var startDate = Date()
    var interval : TimeInterval = 0.0
    Calendar.current.dateInterval(of: .day, start: &startDate, interval: &interval, for: date)
    return DateInterval(start: startDate, duration: interval-1)
}

let interval = dateInterval(of: Date())
print(interval.start, interval.end)
0
extension Date {
    func stringFrom(dateFormat: String) -> String {
        let formatter = DateFormatter()
        formatter.dateFormat = dateFormat
        return formatter.string(from: self)
    }

    func firstSecondInDay() -> Date {
        let dayStr = self.stringFrom(dateFormat: "yyyy-MM-dd")
        let firstSecondStr = "\(dayStr) 00:00:00"
        let format = DateFormatter()
        format.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"
        return format.date(from: firstSecondStr)!
    }

    func lastSecondInDay() -> Date {
        let dayStr = self.stringFrom(dateFormat: "yyyy-MM-dd")
        let laseSecondStr = "\(dayStr) 23:59:59"
        let format = DateFormatter()
        format.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"
        return format.date(from: laseSecondStr)!
    }
}
0

Just for reference, simple way to set Start and End of the day in Swift 4,

var comp: DateComponents = Calendar.current.dateComponents([.year, .month, .day, .hour, .minute, .second], from: Date())
comp.hour = 0
comp.minute = 0
comp.second = 0
comp.timeZone = TimeZone(abbreviation: "UTC")!


//Set Start of Day
let startDate : Date = Calendar.current.date(from: comp)!
print(“Day of Start : \(startDate)")


//Set End of Day
comp.hour = 23
comp.minute = 59
comp.second = 59

let endDate : Date = Calendar.current.date(from:comp)!
print("Day of End : \(endDate)")
0

Since the Calendar struct contains startOfDay(for:), I find it best to encapsulate an endOfDay(for:) method within an extension on Calendar rather than within Date.

The following code can be placed within a Playground file for quick execution.

import Foundation

extension Calendar {

    func endOfDay(for date: Date) -> Date {

        // Get the start of the date argument.
        let dayStart = self.startOfDay(for: date)

        // Add one day to the start of the day 
        // in order to get the start of the following day.            
        guard let nextDayStart = self.date(byAdding: .day, value: 1, to: dayStart) else {
            preconditionFailure("Expected start of next day")
        }

        // Create date components that will subtract a single
        // second from the start of the next day. This will
        // allow you to get the last hour, last minute, and last
        // second of the previous day, which is the day for the 
        // date argument that was passed to this method.
        var components = DateComponents()
        components.second = -1

        // Add the date components to the date for the next 
        // day, which will perform the subtraction of the single
        // second. This will return the end of the day for the date
        // that was passed into this method.
        guard let dayEnd = self.date(byAdding: components, to: nextDayStart) else {
            preconditionFailure("Expected end of day")
        }

        // Simply return the date value.
        return dayEnd
    }

}

To see the formatted date, create a DateFormatter and print the output.

let formatter = DateFormatter()
formatter.dateStyle = .long
formatter.timeStyle = .long
Calendar.current.endOfDay(for: Date()) // "Dec 31, 2020 at 11:59 PM"
-1

Calendar units should be thought of as intervals. As of iOS 10 Calendar has some nice methods for this

let day = Calendar.autoupdatingCurrent.dateInterval(of: .day, for: Date())
day?.start
day?.end.addingTimeInterval(-1)

You can use the same method, to get the start/end of any calendar component (week/month/year etc)

The caveat here is that there isn't a single point in time that can be defined as the end (given that we have a start). The above will give one second before the end of the day (23:59:59).

1
  • This is incorrect. day?.end evaluates to 12:00AM tomorrow, not 11:59PM tonight. Sep 11, 2019 at 20:44

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