7

I'm making a game in Angular. Each player object has an x and a y property. Whenever the player moves, I want to start a timer that cycles through a couple background positions in the sprite sheet.

I thought I would do this with a directive. The problem is that directives normally only let you set one expression to watch:

// "test" directive
module.directive("test", function() {
  return function(scope, element, attrs) {
    scope.$watch(attrs.test, function(value) {
      // do something when it changes
    })
  }
})

// my template
<div test="name"/>

The nice thing about this approach, is the test directive doesn't have to assume the scope has any particular property. You're telling it what to use when you use the directive.

The problem is that in my case I need to kick something off if either x OR y changes. How can I do this?

<div test="player.x, player.y"/>
<div test="player.x" test-two="player.y"/>

Is there a best way to do this that you can think of? Basically I want to make a directive that does something on a timer if any of several properties change.

1
  • Note that I do know you can pass a function into scope.$watch, and return something custom, but this question is more about how I TELL the directive what to do in the function when I bind it. Nov 11, 2012 at 4:43

4 Answers 4

14

The easiest and most readable solution in my opinion is to use two attributes and simply set up two watches:

// "test" directive
module.directive("test", function() {
  return function(scope, element, attrs) {
    var doStuff = function() {
      console.log(attrs.test);
      console.log(attrs.testTwo);
    }
    scope.$watch(attrs.test, doStuff);
    scope.$watch(attrs.testTwo, doStuff);

  }
})

// my template
<div test test="player1.x" test-two="player1.y" />
4
  • I like this syntax the best too, but what if I wanted to make it so this directive could be used on things that don't have an x or a y? All it does is activate when one or more properties change, but the user gets to decide? Nov 12, 2012 at 14:30
  • How would you see the user specifying which attributes to watch?
    – Pete BD
    Nov 13, 2012 at 18:02
  • I guess that's what I'm asking. How would you do what you recommend without forcing to ONLY work with x and y. With any two properties? or a single property, if the user wanted instead? See my comment on eventOn's answer. Nov 13, 2012 at 22:12
  • 2
    there's now watchGroup you can squash the watches together scope.$watch([attrs.test, attrs.testTwo], doStuff); Aug 28, 2014 at 11:40
7

I would try to use a function in the $watch function.

Here is the plunker

var app = angular.module('plunker', [])
.directive('myDir',function(){
  return {
    restrict:'E',
    template:'<span>X:{{x}}, Y:{{y}}</span>',
    link:function(scope, elm, attrs){
      scope.$watch(function (){
        var location = {};
        location.x = attrs.x;
        location.y = attrs.y;
        return location;
      }, function (newVal,oldVal,scope){
        console.log('change !');
        scope.x = newVal.x;
        scope.y = newVal.y;
      }, true);
    }
  };
});

app.controller('MainCtrl', function($scope) {

});





 <div>X: <input type='text' ng-model='x'/></div>
  <div>Y: <input type='text' ng-model='y'/></div>
  <my-dir x='{{x}}' y='{{y}}'></my-dir>
8
  • Why store location inside the first param function of $watch?
    – Pete BD
    Nov 13, 2012 at 18:02
  • then you can monitor the location object.
    – maxisam
    Nov 13, 2012 at 19:13
  • This is the way to use one watch to monitor more than 1 variable. I didn't say it is faster. However, I think it did save you one watch. You might gain some benefit from that. BTW, this is how the creators of AngularJS do it, I saw one core member use this way somewhere.
    – maxisam
    Nov 14, 2012 at 16:59
  • IF you are going to do this then why bother storing the variable... scope.$watch(function (){ return { x: attrs.x, y: attrs.y}; }, ..., true); Apart from this, you are now relying on deep equality. I would still go with two watches that call the same function on a change.
    – Pete BD
    Nov 15, 2012 at 17:28
  • well, I think it is the same. Location is a local variable. You just make it anonymous. What do you mean by "deep equality" ?
    – maxisam
    Nov 15, 2012 at 17:40
1

There is some work arounds for this

Watch multiple $scope attributes

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/angular/yInmKjlrjzI

1
  • What about <div test="{{player.x}} {{player.y}}"/>? The problem is you have to jump over and use attrs.$observe instead of scope.$watch. It seems weird to have to change which function I use depending on how it's used Nov 11, 2012 at 5:04
1
scope.$watch(function () {
  return [attrs.test, attrs.test-two];
}, function(value) {
      // do something when it changes
}, true);

see this link

you can also use $watchGroup - see this link

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