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I have an ArrayList of IndexEntry's which is a simple class with a string, and two integers and a compareTo() method shown below. My issue is that when I call Collections.sort() on the ArrayList most of the time everything sorts correctly, but sometimes two elements will never be compared resulting in an incorrectly sorted list.

Some code for reference:

//Get a list of the values
ArrayList<IndexEntry<T>> cleanEntries = new ArrayList<IndexEntry<T>>(matches.get(query).values());

//Sort Files/URLS
Collections.sort(cleanEntries);

public int compareTo(IndexEntry<T> other) {
    if(this.occurrenceCount < other.getOccurrenceCount()){
        return 1;
    }
    else if(this.occurrenceCount > other.getOccurrenceCount()){
        return -1;
    }
    else{//Need to compare Initial Positions
        if(this.firstOccurrence == other.getFirstOccurrence()){
            return this.getLocationName().compareTo(other.getLocationName());
        }
        else if(this.firstOccurrence > other.getFirstOccurrence()){
            return 1;
        }
        else{
            return -1;
        }
    }
}   

Here is some example output for all IndexEntry's for the letter "C":

c
"index.html", 6, 2
"chickadee.html", 3, 2
"cuckoo.html", 3, 2
"crow.html", 3, 2
"crane.html", 3, 2
"cardinal.html", 3, 2
"quail.html", 2, 2
"robin.html", 2, 2
"finch.html", 2, 2
"kingfisher.html", 2, 2
"swan.html", 2, 2
"turkey.html", 2, 2
"ibis.html", 2, 2
"falcon.html", 2, 2
"albatross.html", 2, 2
"tern.html", 2, 2
"dove.html", 2, 2
"mockingbird.html", 2, 2
"owl.html", 2, 2
"sparrow.html", 2, 2
"hawk.html", 2, 2
"magpie.html", 2, 2
"nighthawk.html", 2, 2
"gull.html", 2, 2
"bluebird.html", 2, 2
"raven.html", 2, 2
"blackbird.html", 2, 2
"sandpiper.html", 2, 2
"pheasant.html", 2, 2
"roadrunner.html", 2, 2
"duck.html", 2, 2
"vulture.html", 2, 2
"pigeon.html", 2, 2
"heron.html", 2, 2
"stork.html", 2, 2
"warbler.html", 2, 2
"woodpecker.html", 2, 2
"hummingbird.html", 2, 2
"mallard.html", 2, 2
"osprey.html", 2, 2
"swallow.html", 2, 2
"wren.html", 2, 2
"goose.html", 2, 2
"meadowlark.html", 2, 2
"pelican.html", 2, 2
"starling.html", 2, 2
"loon.html", 2, 2
"eagle.html", 2, 2
"puffin.html", 2, 2
"egret.html", 2, 2

Notice how after the occurrence counts and initial occurrence are determined to be the same it stops sorting. Correct output would be:

c
"index.html", 6, 2
"cardinal.html", 3, 2
"chickadee.html", 3, 2
"crane.html", 3, 2
"crow.html", 3, 2
"cuckoo.html", 3, 2
"albatross.html", 2, 2
"blackbird.html", 2, 2
"bluebird.html", 2, 2
"dove.html", 2, 2
"duck.html", 2, 2
"eagle.html", 2, 2
"egret.html", 2, 2
"falcon.html", 2, 2
"finch.html", 2, 2
"goose.html", 2, 2
"gull.html", 2, 2
"hawk.html", 2, 2
"heron.html", 2, 2
"hummingbird.html", 2, 2
"ibis.html", 2, 2
"kingfisher.html", 2, 2
"loon.html", 2, 2
"magpie.html", 2, 2
"mallard.html", 2, 2
"meadowlark.html", 2, 2
"mockingbird.html", 2, 2
"nighthawk.html", 2, 2
"osprey.html", 2, 2
"owl.html", 2, 2
"pelican.html", 2, 2
"pheasant.html", 2, 2
"pigeon.html", 2, 2
"puffin.html", 2, 2
"quail.html", 2, 2
"raven.html", 2, 2
"roadrunner.html", 2, 2
"robin.html", 2, 2
"sandpiper.html", 2, 2
"sparrow.html", 2, 2
"starling.html", 2, 2
"stork.html", 2, 2
"swallow.html", 2, 2
"swan.html", 2, 2
"tern.html", 2, 2
"turkey.html", 2, 2
"vulture.html", 2, 2
"warbler.html", 2, 2
"woodpecker.html", 2, 2
"wren.html", 2, 2

Anyways, like I said I have to omit a lot of information, but if anything comes to mind i'd really appreciate ideas. It is a fact that the "matches" data structure is not modified after the creation of the ArrayList.

EDIT: Hey, i'm still reading through your responses. Thanks so much for the quick help! Here is the entire IndexEntry Class since a few of you asked:

    class IndexEntry<extends Comparable<T>> implements Comparable<IndexEntry<T>>{
        private T theLocation;
        private Integer occurrenceCount;
        private Integer firstOccurrence;

        public IndexEntry(T location, Integer firstOcc, Integer occCount){
            theLocation = location;
            occurrenceCount = occCount;
            firstOccurrence = firstOcc;
        }

        public int compareTo(IndexEntry<T> other) {         
            if(this.occurrenceCount < other.getOccurrenceCount()){
                return 1;
            }
            else if(this.occurrenceCount > other.getOccurrenceCount()){
                return -1;
            }
            else{//Need to compare Initial Positions
                if(this.firstOccurrence == other.getFirstOccurrence()){
                    return this.getLocationName().compareTo(other.getLocationName());
                }
                else if(this.firstOccurrence > other.getFirstOccurrence()){
                    return 1;
                }
                else{
                    return -1;
                }
            }
        }   

        public String getLocationName(){
            if(theLocation instanceof File){
                return ((File) theLocation).getAbsolutePath();
            }
            else{
                return theLocation.toString();
            }
        }

        public Integer getFirstOccurrence(){
            return firstOccurrence;
        }

        public Integer getOccurrenceCount(){
            return this.occurrenceCount;
        }

        public void addToOccurrenceCount(Integer toAdd){
            occurrenceCount += toAdd;
        }

        public void setFirstOccurrence(Integer firstOcc){
            firstOccurrence = new Integer(firstOcc);
        }
    }
  • In your output, do the 3 "fields" correspond to locationName, occurenceCount and firstOccurence (in that order)? – assylias Nov 11 '12 at 21:49
  • 3
    Unless I am overlooking something, your compareTo() method looks like it should work. It could be made a bit simpler by using Integer.compareTo() instead of implementing the behavior on the integers yourself, but that does not preclude its correctness. Could you give us some more code, at least so that we can see what the IndexEntry class looks like? I am also curious about the use of generics in it (even though it may have nothing to do with your actual problem). – Julien Oster Nov 11 '12 at 21:57
  • I'd suggest running your code in a debugger (or with plenty of println statements) using a small input that reproduces the problem. – DNA Nov 11 '12 at 22:03
  • 1
    A wild guess: in your example output are you printing out locationName exactly? is it possible that the locations you are comparing are file paths (including directories) , which would compare differently than the file names? To avoid further wild guesses, could you show a bit more of the code of IndexEntry ? – DNA Nov 11 '12 at 22:07
  • More Info: T can be either a file or a string, but in this case it's a string always. – Programmer9000 Nov 11 '12 at 23:30
2

Your code, as you show it, produces the output you give as correct, not the incorrect output you claim it does.

Here's a self-contained demonstration of that:

https://gist.github.com/4056538

| improve this answer | |
  • Hey, just added the IndexEntry class since some of you guys asked. I'm still parsing your responses. – Programmer9000 Nov 11 '12 at 23:27
  • FOUND THE ANSWER BUT CANT POST IT NORMALLY: I don't know why, but for some reason: this.firstOccurrence.equals(other.getFirstOccurrence()) IS NOT EQUIVALENT TO: this.firstOccurrence == other.getFirstOccurrence() Changing that line fixed the compareTo method. I misdiagnosed the problem since every entry was actually getting compared. Sorry for the misinformation and thank you all for the help! – Programmer9000 Nov 12 '12 at 0:01
  • 2
    Ah, that's because it's an Integer, not an int. == compares objects by identity, not value, and two variables of type Integer can refer to objects with the same value which are nonetheless different. Try to avoid using Integer for numbers; all sorts of weird things can happen. – Tom Anderson Nov 12 '12 at 0:20

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