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According When to encode space to plus (+) or %20? when we have any space in html form name or value, our browser will encode the space into "+", but what if we have "plus" sign in value (for example like text field) which is typed by user intentionally? Will our web server misunderstood the symbol and change it back to space? How are we going to avoid this?

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  • Sorry, can anyone tell me who is responsible to change the "+" sign back to space? Is by us (us mean we should handle it in servlet or jsp) or web server?
    – Sam YC
    Nov 12, 2012 at 5:54
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    It is the web stacks (e.g. servlet container) responsibility to give unencoded parameters back to the application/servlet. This decoding happens relatively high up as the params are decoded into key/value pairs. Accidental double-unencoding could result in %2b -> + -> (space), which is why it must be done once only.
    – user166390
    Nov 12, 2012 at 5:57
  • @pst For example, if I am using servlet and jsp, by getParameter("name"), I will receive the string that already been decoded right?
    – Sam YC
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:04
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    @GMsoF I'm not familiar with Java web frameworks, but a good framework will decode your parameters for you. So yes, I'm almost certain you will get a decoded string when you call getParameter("name").
    – surj
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:13

2 Answers 2

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Will our web server misunderstood the symbol and change it back to space?

No, because when a + character is entered in a form, it gets encoded to %2B.

Here's an example (fiddle):

<form method="POST" action="/">
    <input name="foo" type="text" value="+">
    <input name="bar" type="text" value="bacon sauce">
</form>

<script>
    // This encodes the form, (i.e. that's what your server receives)
    alert( $('form').serialize() );
</script>

The alert box will show: foo=%2B&bar=bacon+sauce

This implies that + is encoded as %2B. So on your server, just convert all + characters to a space, and %2B to +, but you should probably leave the decoding part to your framework or a library. ​

Here's a fiddle you can use to play with parameter encoding: fiddle

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    You are talking about html/js/jQuery. The question is about java.
    – rekire
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:04
  • Hi, which mean we have to use Javascript to change the default encoding of the browser?
    – Sam YC
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:06
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    @rekire I was just using jQuery to show how the parameters would be encoded.
    – surj
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:07
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The Plus needs to be converted into the urlencoded form with the % notation. In this case %2B.

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    When you Post the data via browser the browser will encode the strings correctly for you. And if you need to encode the string on the client side you cloud also use the js urlencode function or the jQuery stuff from the other answer.
    – rekire
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:13
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    You almost never have to explicitly encode your url parameters. Like rekire said, the browser does this for you.
    – surj
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:18
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    @GMsoF Let's say your form has a field named "foo". If the user enters + in the form and hits the submit button, the browser converts that + to %2B. Then, when your server receives your request, it converts the %2B back to a +. So, when you call getParameter("foo"), you will get back a + character.
    – surj
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:21
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    @GMsoF Here's a fiddle that you can use to play with the parameter encoding: jsfiddle.net/3MFX2/4
    – surj
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:33
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    So it is in that case. And every char which needs to been protected will get in a form of % and its hexadecimal value.
    – rekire
    Nov 12, 2012 at 6:33

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