112

How can 2 unsorted text files of different lengths be display side by side (in columns) in a shell

Given one.txt and two.txt:

$ cat one.txt
apple
pear
longer line than the last two
last line

$ cat two.txt
The quick brown fox..
foo
bar 
linux

skipped a line

Display:

apple                               The quick brown fox..
pear                                foo
longer line than the last two       bar 
last line                           linux

                                    skipped a line

paste one.txt two.txt almost does the trick but doesn't align the columns nicely as it just prints one tab between column 1 and 2. I know how to this with emacs and vim but want the output displayed to stdout for piping ect.

The solution I came up with uses sdiff and then pipes to sed to remove the output sdiff adds.

sdiff one.txt two.txt | sed -r 's/[<>|]//;s/(\t){3}//'

I could create a function and stick it in my .bashrc but surely a command for this exists already (or a cleaner solution potentially)?

1
  • 1
    Not in a shell, but worth mentioning: use meld!
    – fedorqui
    Sep 28, 2016 at 10:34

9 Answers 9

197

You can use pr to do this, using the -m flag to merge the files, one per column, and -t to omit headers, eg.

pr -m -t one.txt two.txt

outputs:

apple                               The quick brown fox..
pear                                foo
longer line than the last two       bar
last line                           linux

                                    skipped a line

See Also:

10
  • 17
    Perfect! Knew something would exist, never heard of pr before. I tried with 3 files and the output was truncated but the -w option solved that. Nice answer. Nov 12, 2012 at 12:54
  • 5
    @sudo_o: Happy to help, coreutils is full of gems
    – Hasturkun
    Nov 12, 2012 at 13:05
  • 1
    Is there a way for pr to auto-detect screen width?
    – Matt
    Apr 11, 2014 at 18:59
  • 2
    @Matt: You could use $COLUMNS, which should be provided by the shell.
    – Hasturkun
    Aug 11, 2014 at 15:38
  • 1
    When used to print two files side by side, pr cuts the end of long lines. Is there a way to make it wrap the lines?
    – molnarg
    Apr 8, 2015 at 13:23
40

To expand a bit on @Hasturkun's answer: by default pr uses only 72 columns for its output, but it's relatively easy to make it use all available columns of your terminal window:

pr -w $COLUMNS -m -t one.txt two.txt

Most shells will store (and update) your terminal's screenwidth in the $COLUMNS shell variable, so we're just passing that value on to pr to use for its output's width setting.

This also answers @Matt's question:

Is there a way for pr to auto-detect screen width?

So, no: pr itself can't detect the screenwidth, but we're helping it out a bit by passing in the terminal's width via its -w option.

Note that $COLUMNS is a shell variable, not an environment variable, so it isn't exported to child processes, and hence the above approach will likely not work in scripts, only in interactive TTYs... see LINES and COLUMNS environmental variables lost in a script for alternative approaches.

9

If you know the input files have no tabs, then using expand simplifies @oyss's answer:

paste one.txt two.txt | expand --tabs=50

If there could be tabs in the input files, you can always expand first:

paste <(expand one.txt) <(expand two.txt) | expand --tabs=50
6
paste one.txt two.txt | awk -F'\t' '{
    if (length($1)>max1) {max1=length($1)};
    col1[NR] = $1; col2[NR] = $2 }
    END {for (i = 1; i<=NR; i++) {printf ("%-*s     %s\n", max1, col1[i], col2[i])}
}'

Using * in a format specification allows you to supply the field length dynamically.

0
3

If you want to know the actual difference between two files side by side, use diff -y:

diff -y file1.cf file2.cf

You can also set an output width using the -W, --width=NUM option:

diff -y -W 150 file1.cf file2.cf

and to make diff's column output fit your current terminal window:

diff -y -W $COLUMNS file1.cf file2.cf
3

There is a sed way:

f1width=$(wc -L <one.txt)
f1blank="$(printf "%${f1width}s" "")"
paste one.txt two.txt |
    sed "
        s/^\(.*\)\t/\1$f1blank\t/;
        s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 /;
    "

Under , you could use printf -v:

f1width=$(wc -L <one.txt)
printf -v f1blank "%${f1width}s"
paste one.txt two.txt |
    sed "s/^\(.*\)\t/\1$f1blank\t/;
         s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 /;"

(Of course @Hasturkun 's solution pr is the most accurate!):

Advantage of sed over pr

You can finely choose separation width and or separators:

f1width=$(wc -L <one.txt)
(( f1width += 4 ))         # Adding 4 spaces
printf -v f1blank "%${f1width}s"
paste one.txt two.txt |
    sed "s/^\(.*\)\t/\1$f1blank\t/;
         s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 /;"

Or, for sample, to mark lines containing line:

f1width=$(wc -L <one.txt)
printf -v f1blank "%${f1width}s"
paste one.txt two.txt |
    sed "s/^\(.*\)\t/\1$f1blank\t/;
  /line/{s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 |ln| /;ba};
         s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 |  | /;:a"

will render:

apple                         |  | The quick brown fox..
pear                          |  | foo
longer line than the last two |ln| bar 
last line                     |ln| linux
                              |  | 
                              |ln| skipped a line
1
  • bash f1width=$(wc -L <one.txt) printf -v f1blank "%${f1width}s" paste one.txt two.txt | sed "s/^\(.*\)\t/\1$f1blank\t/; /line/{s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 |ln| /;ba}; s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 | | /;:a" Nice solution!! really helpful in other contexts Mar 10, 2021 at 8:41
2

remove dynamically field length counting from Barmar's answer will make it a much shorter command....but you still need at least one script to finish the work which could not be avoided no matter what method you choose.

paste one.txt two.txt |awk -F'\t' '{printf("%-50s %s\n",$1,$2)}'
0
2

Find below a python based solution.

import sys

# Specify the number of spaces between the columns
S = 4

# Read the first file
l0 = open( sys.argv[1] ).read().split('\n')

# Read the second file
l1 = open( sys.argv[2] ).read().split('\n')

# Find the length of the longest line of the first file
n = len(max(l0, key=len))

# Print the lines
for i in  xrange( max( len(l0), len(l1) ) ):

    try:
        print l0[i] + ' '*( n - len(l0[i]) + S) + l1[i]
    except:
        try:
            print ' ' + ' '*( n - 1 + S) + l1[i]
        except:
            print l0[i]

Example

apple                            The quick brown fox..
pear                             foo
longer line than the last two    bar 
last line                        linux

                                 skipped a line
0
diff -y <file1> <file2>


[root /]# cat /one.txt
apple
pear
longer line than the last two
last line
[root /]# cat /two.txt
The quick brown fox..
foo
bar
linux
[root@RHEL6-64 /]# diff -y one.txt two.txt
apple                                                         | The quick brown fox..
pear                                                          | foo
longer line than the last two                                 | bar
last line                                                     | linux
3
  • sdiff is diff -y which I discuss in the question. Jan 1, 2014 at 12:10
  • Yes right... it was mentioned to show another command/flag setting of doing it.
    – Vikas Jain
    Jan 2, 2014 at 5:54
  • But it doesn't answer the questions diff adds characters between the two files. Jan 2, 2014 at 13:49

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