8

When wrapping initializations of a constant I frequently run into scope issues

try {
  const int value = might_throw();
}
std::cout << value << "\n";  /* error, value out of scope */

Currently I use a temporary value as a workaround. Is there a better way to deal with const - try {} situations?

int tmp;  /* I'd rather have tmp const */
try {
  tmp = might_throw();
}
catch (...) {
  /* do something */
}
const int value = tmp;
  • 4
    What’s the reason for not using the variable in the try block? – Konrad Rudolph Nov 12 '12 at 12:07
  • 1
    The variable might be used in many lines following the try block. Are you saying I should enlarge my try block to enclose everything, even if that includes many lines of code that is only related by the use of the variable? – Micha Wiedenmann Nov 12 '12 at 12:11
  • 1
    Not necessarily. I just wanted to get the (potentially) easiest solution out of the way. I do agree that it’s a problem in some situations. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 12 '12 at 12:18
10

Instead of your

int tmp;  /* I'd rather have tmp const */
try {
    tmp = might_throw();
}
catch (...) {
    /* do something */
}
const int value = tmp;

you can do this:

int int_value()
{
    try {
        return might_throw();
    }
    catch (...) {
        /* do something */
        return the_something_value;
    }
}

int main()
{
    int const value = int_value();
}

Or, in C++11 you can do

int main()
{
    int const value = []() -> int {
        try {
            return might_throw();
        }
        catch (...) {
            /* do something */
            return the_something_value;
        }
    } ();
}
3

To me this looks like a case for a function:

int const value = []()->int {
    try { return might_throw(); }
    catch (...) { return come_up_with_a_value_differently(); }
}();
0
try {
   const int value = might_throw();
   std::cout << value << '\n';
}
catch (...) {
   std::cout << "threw instead of giving me a value :(\n";
}

try is a scope block for a reason!

If you're doing far more than a std::cout with value then, yeah, it gets a bit messier. Then you have a choice of:

  • dropping the const,
  • encasing all logic that uses value in the try, or
  • initialising a const int from the value returned by a function int mightThrowWrapper(int default = 0) that itself wraps try/catch and returns a default on throw. Then you've got your localised exception handling and constness!

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