72

SQL query for a carriage return in a string and ultimately removing carriage return

I have some data in a table and there are some carriage returns in places where I don't want them. I am trying to write a query to get all of the strings that contain carriage returns.

I tried this

select * from Parameters
where Name LIKE '%"\n" %'

Also

select * from Parameters
where Name LIKE '\r'

'

Both are valid SQL but are not returning what I am looking for. Do I need to use the Like command or a different command? How do I get the carriage return into the query?

The carriage return is not necessarily at the end of the line either (may be in the middle).

1
  • was this for sql server?
    – KM.
    Commented Aug 26, 2009 at 20:23

10 Answers 10

94

this will be slow, but if it is a one time thing, try...

select * from parameters where name like '%'+char(13)+'%' or name like '%'+char(10)+'%'

Note that the ANSI SQL string concatenation operator is "||", so it may need to be:

select * from parameters where name like '%' || char(13) || '%' or name like '%' || char(10) || '%'
7
  • 4
    Postgresql uses the function name chr instead of char. Commented Nov 20, 2014 at 5:41
  • 7
    @mmcrae if you look at the edit history, you'll see that the "ANSI SQL" section was added to my answer. I've never used || in any of the SQL that I've done. I never really concern myself with ANSI SQL equivelents. I just code for the current database and be done with it. In my experience, you are never going to convert from one database vendor to another. Each vendor has added many extra SQL commands or variations beyond and/or in place of the ANSI standards, which make it virtually impossible to code anything complex and be 100% ANSI compatible.
    – KM.
    Commented Jul 6, 2015 at 14:56
  • 4
    || is not OR . In postgresql is concatenation.
    – netanyahoo
    Commented Feb 22, 2017 at 8:49
  • 2
    @jipipayo, I don't like when people edit my answers like this.
    – KM.
    Commented Feb 22, 2017 at 13:38
  • 1
    @KM. i did not edit your answer, it was Kevin Panko, i just referenced the mmcrae. comment above.
    – netanyahoo
    Commented Feb 23, 2017 at 9:12
80

The main question was to remove the CR/LF. Using the replace and char functions works for me:

Select replace(replace(Name,char(10),''),char(13),'')

For Postgres or Oracle SQL, use the CHR function instead:

       replace(replace(Name,CHR(10),''),CHR(13),'')
1
  • This select will just show the table without carriage returns and line feeds, but how it can be permanently removed from the source table? Commented Jan 10, 2019 at 15:36
14

In SQL Server I would use:

WHERE CHARINDEX(CHAR(13), name) <> 0 OR CHARINDEX(CHAR(10), name) <> 0

This will search for both carriage returns and line feeds.

If you want to search for tabs too just add:

OR CHARINDEX(CHAR(9), name) <> 0
4

this works: select * from table where column like '%(hit enter)%'

Ignore the brackets and hit enter to introduce new line.

1
  • This is the only solution of all posted answers, that works for me with PostgreSQL 9.6.19
    – MaggusK
    Commented Nov 14, 2023 at 8:32
3

You can also use regular expressions:

SELECT * FROM Parameters WHERE Name REGEXP '\n';
1

You can create a function:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.[Check_existance_of_carriage_return_line_feed]
(
      @String VARCHAR(MAX)
)
RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX)
BEGIN
DECLARE @RETURN_BOOLEAN INT

;WITH N1 (n) AS (SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1),
N2 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM N1 AS X, N1 AS Y),
N3 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM N2 AS X, N2 AS Y),
N4 (n) AS (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY X.n)
FROM N3 AS X, N3 AS Y)

SELECT @RETURN_BOOLEAN =COUNT(*)
FROM N4 Nums
WHERE Nums.n<=LEN(@String) AND ASCII(SUBSTRING(@String,Nums.n,1)) 
IN (13,10)    

RETURN (CASE WHEN @RETURN_BOOLEAN >0 THEN 'TRUE' ELSE 'FALSE' END)
END
GO

Then you can simple run a query like this:

SELECT column_name, dbo.[Check_existance_of_carriage_return_line_feed] (column_name)
AS [Boolean]
FROM [table_name]
0

Omit the double quotes from your first query.

... LIKE '%\n%' 
0

This also works

SELECT TRANSLATE(STRING_WITH_NL_CR, CHAR(10) || CHAR(13), '  ') FROM DUAL;
1
  • 2
    This is the Oracle syntax?
    – HLGEM
    Commented Jan 8, 2015 at 19:54
0

Something like this seems to work for me:

SELECT * FROM Parameters WHERE Name LIKE '%\n%'
0

If you are considering creating a function, try this: DECLARE @schema sysname = 'dbo' , @tablename sysname = 'mvtEST' , @cmd NVarchar(2000) , @ColName sysname

    DECLARE @NewLine Table
    (ColumnName Varchar(100)
    ,Location Int
    ,ColumnValue Varchar(8000)
    )

    SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE  TABLE_SCHEMA = @schema AND TABLE_NAME =  @tablename AND DATA_TYPE LIKE '%CHAR%'

    DECLARE looper CURSOR FAST_FORWARD for
    SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = @schema AND TABLE_NAME =  @tablename AND DATA_TYPE LIKE '%CHAR%'
    OPEN looper
    FETCH NEXT FROM looper INTO @ColName

    WHILE @@fetch_status = 0
    BEGIN
    SELECT @cmd = 'select ''' +@ColName+    ''',  CHARINDEX(Char(10),  '+  @ColName +') , '+ @ColName + ' from '+@schema + '.'+@tablename +' where CHARINDEX(Char(10),  '+  @ColName +' ) > 0 or CHARINDEX(CHAR(13), '+@ColName +') > 0'
    PRINT @cmd
    INSERT @NewLine ( ColumnName, Location, ColumnValue )
    EXEC sp_executesql @cmd
    FETCH NEXT FROM looper INTO @ColName
    end
    CLOSE looper
    DEALLOCATE looper


    SELECT * FROM  @NewLine

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