62

I'm declaring some strings that are empty, so it won't throw errors later on.

I've read that this was the proper way:

string Camnr = Klantnr = Ordernr = Bonnr = Volgnr = Omschrijving = Startdatum = Bonprioriteit = Matsoort = Dikte = Draaibaarheid = Draaiomschrijving = Orderleverdatum = Regeltaakkode = Gebruiksvoorkeur = Regelcamprog = Regeltijd = Orderrelease = "";

But that doesn't work. I get this error: Klantnr does not exist in the current context.

What did I do wrong?

  • 3
    Why would you do that in C#. It's not readable, looks ugly and like a bad written Javascript. – Matija Grcic Nov 14 '12 at 7:27
  • 3
    Because i want to declare the variables at the start, and define them on the fly later (depends on the given input) – Mathlight Nov 14 '12 at 7:29
123

You can do it like:

string Camnr, Klantnr, Ordernr, Bonnr, Volgnr;// and so on.
Camnr = Klantnr = Ordernr = Bonnr = Volgnr = string.Empty;

First you have to define the variables and then you can use them.

  • That did the trick, thank you :P – Mathlight Nov 14 '12 at 7:18
  • @TWCrap, You are welcome – Habib Nov 14 '12 at 7:27
  • @Habib can we do same for session and viewbag? Like: Session["a"] = ViewBag.aa = "hello"; – Dhwani Jun 26 '14 at 9:20
  • 4
    @Dhwani, not sure, why don't you try it – Habib Jun 26 '14 at 11:38
  • I think @Botz3000's answer save bit more characters!!! – Bhavesh Feb 1 at 6:11
37

You can to do it this way:

string Camnr = "", Klantnr = "", ... // or String.Empty

Or you could declare them all first and then in the next line use your way.

  • I had it that way, but i was looking for an nicer way... – Mathlight Nov 14 '12 at 7:17
  • 2
    You should use String.Empty (String.Empty creates no object so it is more efficient than "", also readability is better) – Matija Grcic Nov 14 '12 at 7:19
  • 3
    @plurby, string.Empty is same as using "". See stackoverflow.com/questions/263191/… – Habib Nov 14 '12 at 7:23
  • "" will be created once per assembly or once per AppDomain (the performance is insignificant but i wanted to point to the approach that's more readable). – Matija Grcic Nov 14 '12 at 7:26
  • @plurby I already added that option as a comment. However, performancewise you most probably wouldn't ever notice any difference, and some people also find "" easier to read. I'd say that makes it a matter of personal (or team) preference, so i used the same as in the question. – Botz3000 Nov 14 '12 at 7:33
6

An example of what I call Concatenated-declarations:

string Camnr = "",
        Klantnr = "",
        Ordernr = "",
        Bonnr = "",
        Volgnr = "",
        Omschrijving = "",
        Startdatum = "",
        Bonprioriteit = "",
        Matsoort = "",
        Dikte = "",
        Draaibaarheid = "",
        Draaiomschrijving = "",
        Orderleverdatum = "",
        Regeltaakkode = "",
        Gebruiksvoorkeur = "",
        Regelcamprog = "",
        Regeltijd = "",
        Orderrelease = "";

Just my 2 cents, hope it helps someone somewhere.

  • 2
    I appreciate your 2 cents. But it seems like your answer is the same as that of botz3000 (only u use indentation) – Mathlight Oct 11 '14 at 8:48
  • 1
    Ah, I saw now. You are right, this is the same, except this actually has decent formatting included. – HowlinWulf Oct 13 '14 at 7:06
5

Try with:

 string Camnr, Klantnr, Ordernr, Bonnr, Volgnr, Omschrijving;
 Camnr = Klantnr = Ordernr = Bonnr = Volgnr = Omschrijving = string.Empty;
4

Try

string     Camnr , Klantnr , Ordernr , Bonnr , Volgnr , Omschrijving , Startdatum ,    Bonprioriteit , Matsoort , Dikte , Draaibaarheid , Draaiomschrijving , Orderleverdatum , Regeltaakkode , Gebruiksvoorkeur , Regelcamprog , Regeltijd , Orderrelease ;

and then

Camnr = Klantnr = Ordernr = Bonnr = Volgnr = Omschrijving = Startdatum = Bonprioriteit = Matsoort = Dikte = Draaibaarheid = Draaiomschrijving = Orderleverdatum = Regeltaakkode = Gebruiksvoorkeur = Regelcamprog = Regeltijd = Orderrelease = "";
  • That's right, so upvote for you, but habib was first :P – Mathlight Nov 14 '12 at 7:20
3
string Camnr , Klantnr , Ordernr , Bonnr , Volgnr , Omschrijving , Startdatum , Bonprioriteit , Matsoort , Dikte , Draaibaarheid , Draaiomschrijving , Orderleverdatum , Regeltaakkode , Gebruiksvoorkeur , Regelcamprog , Regeltijd , Orderrelease;
Camnr = Klantnr = Ordernr = Bonnr = Volgnr = Omschrijving = Startdatum = Bonprioriteit = Matsoort = Dikte = Draaibaarheid = Draaiomschrijving = Orderleverdatum = Regeltaakkode = Gebruiksvoorkeur = Regelcamprog = Regeltijd = Orderrelease = string.Empty;
1

Just a reminder: Implicit type var in multiple declaration is not allowed. There might be the following compilation errors.

var Foo = 0, Bar = 0;

Implicitly-typed variables cannot have multiple declarators

Similarly,

var Foo, Bar;

Implicitly-typed variables must be initialized

0

Fairly old question but incase someone goes back.
This isn't as compact as the other answers above, but fairly readable and easier to type using Visual Studio Multi-Line selection shortcut [Alt+ Shift + ↑] (or other directions)

string Camnr = string.Empty;
string Klantnr = string.Empty;

Type out all variable names on new lines. Multi-Select in front of them an type "string". Multi-Select behind them and type "= string.Empty;".

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