9

I am trying to implement a decorator class which would decorate methods in other classes. However, I need the class which holds the decorated method available in the decorator. I can't seem to find it anywhere.

Here's an example:

class my_decorator(object):

  def __init__(self, arg1, arg2):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".__init__")
    self.arg1 = arg1
    self.arg2 = arg2

  def __call__(self, my_callable):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".__call__")
    print(type(my_callable))
    self.my_callable = my_callable
#    self.my_callable_method_class = ?where to get this?

    def function_wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
      print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".function_wrapper")
      print(self.arg1)
      self.my_callable.__call__(*args, **kwargs)
      print(self.arg2)

    return function_wrapper


class MyClass(object):

  @my_decorator(arg1="one", arg2="two")
  def decorated_method(self):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".decorated_method")
    print(type(self.decorated_method))
    print("hello")


m = MyClass()
m.decorated_method()

That will print out this:

my_decorator.__init__
my_decorator.__call__
<type 'function'>
my_decorator.function_wrapper
one
MyClass.decorated_method
<type 'instancemethod'>
hello
two

In the decorator class the callable is of type function, while inside the class itself it is of type instancemethod. I can get the im_class from instancemethod, but there is no such thing in function.

How can I get the class containing the decorated method from within the decorator?

I could do this:

class my_decorator(object):

  def __init__(self, cls, arg1, arg2):

.
.

class MyClass(object):

  @my_decorator(cls=MyClass, arg1="one", arg2="two")
  def decorated_method(self):

.
.

But I would not like to do that because it's redundant and not nice.

Or should I implement this some other way? I basicly need a couple of arguments to the decorator, and I need the class of the decorated method in the decorator.

  • When exactly do you need the class? You may modify the internal wrapper to def function_wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs) and obtain the class as self.__class__. If you need the class outside the decorator then its a lot harder as katrielalex already pointed out. – Bakuriu Nov 15 '12 at 9:10
3

You could decorate the class:

@decorate
class MyClass(object):

  @my_decorator(arg1="one", arg2="two")
  def decorated_method(self):

and use the outer decorator to send the class argument to the inner.


None of your proposals can work, because they require access to the class before it exists. When you define a class, you first execute the code inside its body (defining functions etc) and then assign the resulting scope to the class as its __dict__. So at the time that decorated_method is defined, MyClass doesn't exist yet.

  • This looks like the way to go. But how do I link the class decorator and the method decorator? I will have lots of classes and methods using the same decorators... – kortsi Nov 15 '12 at 9:37
  • @my_decorator should mark the methods that it has decorated, say by giving them a special attribute. @decorate should iterate over all the class methods, filtering those without the special attribute, and perform its decoration on each in turn. – Katriel Nov 15 '12 at 9:39
  • So it seems to work. Thanks! – kortsi Nov 15 '12 at 10:27
1

Here's a revised version which works.

# This holds all called method_decorators
global_method_decorator_list = []

class class_decorator(object):
  def __init__(self, arg1, arg2):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".__init__")
    self.arg1 = arg1
    self.arg2 = arg2

  def __call__(self, my_class):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".__call__")
    print(repr(my_class))
    print(my_class.__name__)
    self.cls = my_class
    class_decorators[my_class] = self
    self.my_class = my_class

    # Call each method decorator's second_init()
    for d in global_method_decorator_list:
      d._method_decorator_.second_init(self, my_class)

    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
      print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".wrapper")
      print(self.arg1)
      retval = self.my_class.__call__(*args, **kwargs)
      print(self.arg2)
      return retval

    return wrapper


class method_decorator(object):
  def __init__(self, arg1, arg2):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".__init__")
    self.arg1 = arg1
    self.arg2 = arg2

  def __call__(self, my_callable):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".__call__")
    print(repr(my_callable))
    self.my_callable = my_callable

    # Mark the callable and add to global list
    my_callable._method_decorator_ = self
    global_method_decorator_list.append(my_callable)

    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
      print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".wrapper")
      print(self.arg1)
      retval=self.my_callable.__call__(*args, **kwargs)
      print(self.arg2)
      return retval

    return wrapper

  def second_init(self, the_class_decorator, the_class):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".second_init")
    print("The Class: " + repr(the_class))**


@class_decorator(arg1="One", arg2="Two")
class MyClass(object):

  @method_decorator(arg1="one", arg2="two")
  def decorated_method(self):
    print(self.__class__.__name__ + ".decorated_method")
    print(type(self.decorated_method))
    print("hello")


m = MyClass()
m.decorated_method()

The output looks like this:

class_decorator.__init__
method_decorator.__init__
method_decorator.__call__
<function decorated_method at 0x3063500>
class_decorator.__call__
<class '__main__.MyClass'>
MyClass
method_decorator.second_init
The Class: <class '__main__.MyClass'>
class_decorator.wrapper
One
Two
method_decorator.wrapper
one
MyClass.decorated_method
<type 'instancemethod'>
hello
two

The difference is that there is now a separate decorator for the class. The class decorator's call() will call each of the method decorators "second_init()" method, and passes the class there.

It is interesting to note, that the method_decorator's call() will be called before the class_decorator's.

0

If you make the object returned by your decorator a descriptor, then you can hook the attribute lookup to return some other object that links the method and class (or instance).

For a method style descriptor, you only need to implement the __get__ method. When looking up the method on the class, the following two are equivalent:

m = MyClass.decorated_method
# It will actually get the object from any parent class too.  But this will do for a simple example
m = MyClass.__dict__['decorated_method'].__get__(MyClass)

And for instances, the following are equivalent:

instance = MyClass()
m = instance.decorated_method
m = type(instance).__dict__['decorated_method'].__get__(instance, type(instance))

So the expression instance.decorated_method(...) actually calls the object returned by your __get__ method. This is the same process that allows simple function objects to turn into bound method objects that add the implicit self argument.

When creating this callable, you should have all the information you need.

  • The problem with this one is that I need to do work with the class before I create the first instance. – kortsi Nov 15 '12 at 9:34
  • Fair enough. Then you'll probably want a decorator that marks functions like katrielalex suggested, and then fix things up either from a class decorator or a metaclass constructor. – James Henstridge Nov 15 '12 at 9:47

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