3

I wish to filter a nested javascript object by the value of the "step" key:

var data = {
"name": "Root",
"step": 1,
"id": "0.0",   
"children": [
    {
    "name": "first level child 1",
    "id": "0.1",
    "step":2,
    "children": [
        {
        "name": "second level child 1",
        "id": "0.1.1",
        "step": 3,
        "children": [
            {
            "name": "third level child 1",
            "id": "0.1.1.1",
            "step": 4,
            "children": []},
        {
            "name": "third level child 2",
            "id": "0.1.1.2",
            "step": 5,
            "children": []}

        ]},
                ]}
]

};

var subdata = data.children.filter(function (d) {
        return (d.step <= 2)});

This just returns the unmodified nested object, even if I put value of filter to 1. does .filter work on nested objects or do I need to roll my own function here, advise and correct code appreciated. cjm

3 Answers 3

2

Recursive filter functions are fairly easy to create. This is an example, which strips a JS object of all items defined ["depth","x","x0","y","y0","parent","size"]:

function filter(data) {
  for(var i in data){
    if(["depth","x","x0","y","y0","parent","size"].indexOf(i) != -1){
       delete data[i]; 
    } else if (i === "children") {
      for (var j in data.children) {
        data.children[j] = filter(data.children[j])
      }
    }  
  }
  return data;
}

If you would like to filter by something else, just updated the 2nd line with your filter function of choice.

1

Here's the function to filter nested arrays:

const filter = arr => condition => {
    const res = [];
    for (const item of arr) {
        if (condition(item)) {
            if (!item.children) {
                res.push({ ...item });
            } else {
                const children = filter(item.children)(condition);
                res.push({ ...item, children })
            }
        }
    }
    return res;
}

The only thing you have to do is to wrap your root object into an array to reach self-similarity. In common, your input array should look like this:

data = [
    { <...>, children: [
        { <...>, children: [...] },
        ...
    ] },
    ...
]

where <...> stands for some properties (in your case those are "name", "step" and "id"), and "children" is an optional service property. Now you can pass your wrapped object into the filter function alongside a condition callback:

filter(data)(item => item.step <= 2)

and you'll get your structure filtered. Here are a few more functions to deal with such structures I've just coded for fun:

const map = arr => f => {
    const res = [];
    for (const item of arr) {
        if (!item.children) {
            res.push({ ...f({ ...item }) });
        } else {
            res.push({ ...f({ ...item }), children: map(item.children)(f) });
        }
    }
    return res;
}

const reduce = arr => g => init => {
    if (!arr) return undefined;
    let res = init;
    for (const item of arr) {
        if (!item.children) {
            res = g(res)({ ...item });
        } else {
            res = g(res)({ ...item });
            res = reduce(item.children)(g)(res);
        }
    }
    return res;
}

Usage examples:

map(data)(item => ({ step: item.step }))
reduce(data)($ => item => $ + item.step)(0)

Likely, the code samples aren't ideal but probably could push someone to the right direction.

-2

Yes, filter works on one array (list), like the children of one node. You have got a tree, if you want to search the whole tree you will need to use a tree traversal algorithm or you first put all nodes into an array which you can filter. I'm sure you can write the code yourself.

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