How would get find an average from an array?

If I have the array:

[0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]

Averaging would give me 3.375.

Thanks!

  • 11
    If you're getting 21.75 as the average of those numbers, something's very wrong... – ceejayoz Aug 27 '09 at 14:06
  • 2
    dotty, not sure how you got 21.75 but the average/mean for that set of data is 3.375 and the sum is 27. i'm not sure what sort of aggregation function would yield 21.75. Please double check and make sure that average is really what you're after! – Paul Sasik Aug 27 '09 at 14:07
  • 2
    I have NO idea where i got 21.75 from. Must had press something like 0+48+2+5+0+2+6 on the calculator! – dotty Aug 27 '09 at 14:19
  • 14
    Since this is also tagged ruby-on-rails, active record calculations are worth looking into if you are averaging an ActiveRecord array. Person.average(:age, :country => 'Brazil') returns the average age of people from Brazil. Pretty cool! – Kyle Heironimus Oct 27 '10 at 17:35

16 Answers 16

up vote 232 down vote accepted

Try this:

arr = [5, 6, 7, 8]
arr.inject{ |sum, el| sum + el }.to_f / arr.size
=> 6.5

Note the .to_f, which you'll want for avoiding any problems from integer division. You can also do:

arr = [5, 6, 7, 8]
arr.inject(0.0) { |sum, el| sum + el } / arr.size
=> 6.5

You can define it as part of Array as another commenter has suggested, but you need to avoid integer division or your results will be wrong. Also, this isn't generally applicable to every possible element type (obviously, an average only makes sense for things that can be averaged). But if you want to go that route, use this:

class Array
  def sum
    inject(0.0) { |result, el| result + el }
  end

  def mean 
    sum / size
  end
end

If you haven't seen inject before, it's not as magical as it might appear. It iterates over each element and then applies an accumulator value to it. The accumulator is then handed to the next element. In this case, our accumulator is simply an integer that reflects the sum of all the previous elements.

Edit: Commenter Dave Ray proposed a nice improvement.

Edit: Commenter Glenn Jackman's proposal, using arr.inject(:+).to_f, is nice too but perhaps a bit too clever if you don't know what's going on. The :+ is a symbol; when passed to inject, it applies the method named by the symbol (in this case, the addition operation) to each element against the accumulator value.

  • 5
    You can eliminate to_f and ? operator by passing an initial value to inject: arr.inject(0.0) { |sum,el| sum + el } / arr.size. – Dave Ray Aug 27 '09 at 14:37
  • 92
    Or: arr.inject(:+).to_f / arr.size # => 3.375 – glenn jackman Aug 27 '09 at 15:11
  • 5
    I don't think this warrants adding to the Array class, since it's not generalizable to all the types that Arrays can contain. – Sarah Mei Aug 27 '09 at 17:12
  • 7
    @John: That's not exactly Symbol#to_proc conversion — it's part of the inject interface, mentioned in the documentation. The to_proc operator is &. – Chuck Aug 27 '09 at 18:53
  • 17
    If you're using Rails, Array#inject is overkill here. Just use #sum. E.g. arr.sum.to_f / arr.size – nickh Jul 31 '13 at 19:24
a = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
a.instance_eval { reduce(:+) / size.to_f } #=> 3.375

A version of this that does not use instance_eval would be:

a = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
a.reduce(:+) / a.size.to_f #=> 3.375
  • 4
    I don't think it is too clever. I think it solves the problem idiomatically. I.e., it uses reduce, which is exactly correct. Programmers should be encouraged to understand what is correct, why it is correct, and then propagate. For a trivial operation like average, true, one doesn't need to be "clever". But by understanding what "reduce" is for a trivial case, one can then start applying it to much more complex problems. upvote. – pduey Feb 7 '12 at 17:50
  • 3
    why the need for instance_eval here? – tybro0103 May 9 '12 at 16:13
  • 9
    instance_eval lets you run the code while only specifying a once, so it can be chained with other commands. I.e. random_average = Array.new(10) { rand(10) }.instance_eval { reduce(:+) / size.to_f } instead of random = Array.new(10) { rand(10) }; random_average = random.reduce(:+) / random.size – Benjamin Manns Jul 10 '12 at 17:56
  • 2
    I don't know, using instance_eval this way just seems weird, and it has a lot of gotchas associated with it that make this approach a bad idea, IMO. (For example, if you tried to access and instance variable or a method on self inside that block, you'd run into problems.) instance_eval is more for metaprogramming or DSL. – Ajedi32 May 21 '15 at 21:55
  • 1
    @Ajedi32 I agree, don't use this in your application code. It was however very nice to be able to paste into my repl (: – animatedgif Nov 27 '17 at 20:31

I believe the simplest answer is

list.reduce(:+).to_f / list.size
  • 1
    It took me a moment to find it -- reduce is a method of the Enumerable mixin used by Array. And despite its name, I agree with the @ShuWu ... unless you're using Rails which implements sum. – Tom Harrison Jr Aug 31 '13 at 23:21
  • I see solutions here, that I know that look extremely neat, but I'm afraid if I read my code in the future they'll like gibberish. Thanks for the clean solution! – atmosx Sep 11 '14 at 11:16

I was hoping for Math.average(values), but no such luck.

values = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
average = values.sum / values.size.to_f
  • 8
    I think this might be a Rails Extension, so not a general ruby case answer. Still gave you an upvote anyway. – taelor Jun 28 '11 at 18:19
  • 3
    I didn't realize #sum was added by Rails! Thanks for pointing that out. – Denny Abraham Jul 26 '11 at 11:29
  • 8
    After Christmas 2016 (Ruby 2.4), Array will have a sum method, so this appears to be a correct answer after 6 years, worthy of the Nostradamus award. – steenslag Nov 28 '16 at 21:57

Ruby versions >= 2.4 has an Enumerable#sum method.

And to get floating point average, you can use Integer#fdiv

arr = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]

arr.sum.fdiv(arr.size)
# => 3.375

For older versions:

arr.reduce(:+).fdiv(arr.size)
# => 3.375

For public amusement, yet another solution:

a = 0, 4, 8, 2, 5, 0, 2, 6
a.reduce [ 0.0, 0 ] do |(s, c), e| [ s + e, c + 1 ] end.reduce :/
#=> 3.375
  • 1
    If this was higher up in the voting I would not have understood it! Very good. – Matt Stevens May 21 '15 at 21:17

Let me bring something into competition which solves the division by zero problem:

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
a.reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/,a.size) #==> 4.5

a = []
a.reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/,a.size) #==> nil

I must admit, however, that "try" is a Rails helper. But you can easily solve this:

class Object;def try(*options);self&&send(*options);end;end
class Array;def avg;reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/,size);end;end

BTW: I think it is correct that the average of an empty list is nil. The average of nothing is nothing, not 0. So that is expected behavior. However, if you change to:

class Array;def avg;reduce(0.0,:+).try(:/,size);end;end

the result for empty Arrays won't be an exception as I had expected but instead it returns NaN... I've never seen that before in Ruby. ;-) Seems to be a special behavior of the Float class...

0.0/0 #==> NaN
0.1/0 #==> Infinity
0.0.class #==> Float

Some benchmarking of top solutions (in order of most efficient):

Large Array:

array = (1..10_000_000).to_a

Benchmark.bm do |bm|
  bm.report { array.instance_eval { reduce(:+) / size.to_f } }
  bm.report { array.sum.fdiv(array.size) }
  bm.report { array.sum / array.size.to_f }
  bm.report { array.reduce(:+).to_f / array.size }
  bm.report { array.reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/, array.size) }
  bm.report { array.inject(0.0) { |sum, el| sum + el }.to_f / array.size }
  bm.report { array.reduce([ 0.0, 0 ]) { |(s, c), e| [ s + e, c + 1 ] }.reduce(:/) }
end


    user     system      total        real
0.480000   0.000000   0.480000   (0.473920)
0.500000   0.000000   0.500000   (0.502158)
0.500000   0.000000   0.500000   (0.508075)
0.510000   0.000000   0.510000   (0.512600)
0.520000   0.000000   0.520000   (0.516096)
0.760000   0.000000   0.760000   (0.767743)
1.530000   0.000000   1.530000   (1.534404)

Small Arrays:

array = Array.new(10) { rand(0.5..2.0) }

Benchmark.bm do |bm|
  bm.report { 1_000_000.times { array.reduce(:+).to_f / array.size } }
  bm.report { 1_000_000.times { array.sum / array.size.to_f } }
  bm.report { 1_000_000.times { array.sum.fdiv(array.size) } }
  bm.report { 1_000_000.times { array.inject(0.0) { |sum, el| sum + el }.to_f / array.size } }
  bm.report { 1_000_000.times { array.instance_eval { reduce(:+) / size.to_f } } }
  bm.report { 1_000_000.times { array.reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/, array.size) } }
  bm.report { 1_000_000.times { array.reduce([ 0.0, 0 ]) { |(s, c), e| [ s + e, c + 1 ] }.reduce(:/) } }
end


    user     system      total        real
0.760000   0.000000   0.760000   (0.760353)
0.870000   0.000000   0.870000   (0.876087)
0.900000   0.000000   0.900000   (0.901102)
0.920000   0.000000   0.920000   (0.920888)
0.950000   0.000000   0.950000   (0.952842)
1.690000   0.000000   1.690000   (1.694117)
1.840000   0.010000   1.850000   (1.845623)
  • Your benchmark is a bit wrong. benchmark/ips is actually better for these kind of comparisons. Also I would suggest to use an Array populated randomly with negative and positive numbers as well as floats, to get a more realistic result. You'll find that instance_eval is slower than array.sum.fdiv . By about 8x for floats. and about x1.12 for integers. Also, different OSes will give different results. on my mac some of these methods are 2 times as slow than on my Linux Droplet – konung Sep 7 at 18:38
  • Also sum method uses Gauss's formula, on ranges instead of calculating the sum. – Santhosh Sep 21 at 3:23
class Array
  def sum 
    inject( nil ) { |sum,x| sum ? sum+x : x }
  end

  def mean 
    sum.to_f / size.to_f
  end
end

[0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6].mean
  • 2
    This returns incorrect values because of integer division. Try it with, for example, [2,3].mean, which returns 2 instead of 2.5. – John Feminella Aug 27 '09 at 14:06
  • 2
    Needs more floatyness. – Andy Gaskell Aug 27 '09 at 14:08
  • 1
    Why should an empty array have a sum of nil rather than 0? – Andrew Grimm May 23 '11 at 11:59
  • 1
    Because you can get the difference between [] and [0]. And I think everybody who want a real mean can make use of to_i or replace the above nil with an 0 – astropanic May 23 '11 at 12:58

what I don't like about the accepted solution

arr = [5, 6, 7, 8]
arr.inject{ |sum, el| sum + el }.to_f / arr.size
=> 6.5

is that it does not really work in a purely functional way. we need a variable arr to compute arr.size at the end.

to solve this purely functionally we need to keep track of two values: the sum of all elements, and the number of elements.

[5, 6, 7, 8].inject([0.0,0]) do |r,ele|
    [ r[0]+ele, r[1]+1 ]
end.inject(:/)
=> 6.5   

Santhosh improved on this solution: instead of the argument r being an array, we could use destructuring to immediatly pick it apart into two variables

[5, 6, 7, 8].inject([0.0,0]) do |(sum, size), ele| 
   [ sum + ele, size + 1 ]
end.inject(:/)

if you want to see how it works, add some puts:

[5, 6, 7, 8].inject([0.0,0]) do |(sum, size), ele| 
   r2 = [ sum + ele, size + 1 ]
   puts "adding #{ele} gives #{r2}"
   r2
end.inject(:/)

adding 5 gives [5.0, 1]
adding 6 gives [11.0, 2]
adding 7 gives [18.0, 3]
adding 8 gives [26.0, 4]
=> 6.5

We could also use a struct instead of an array to contain the sum and the count, but then we have to declare the struct first:

R=Struct.new(:sum, :count)
[5, 6, 7, 8].inject( R.new(0.0, 0) ) do |r,ele|
    r.sum += ele
    r.count += 1
    r
end.inject(:/)
  • This is the first time I see end.method used in ruby, thanks for this! – Epigene Apr 14 '15 at 13:18
  • The array passed to inject method can be dispersed. arr.inject([0.0,0]) { |(sum, size), el| [ sum + el, size + 1 ] }.inject(:/) – Santhosh Apr 1 at 8:08
  • @Santhosh: yes, that's a lot more readable! I would not call this "dispersing" though, I would call it "destructuring" tony.pitluga.com/2011/08/08/destructuring-with-ruby.html – bjelli Apr 2 at 12:16

Don't have ruby on this pc, but something to this extent should work:

values = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
total = 0.0
values.each do |val|
 total += val
end

average = total/values.size
a = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
sum = 0
a.each { |b| sum += b }
average = sum / a.length
  • 4
    This will return incorrect values because of integer division. For example, if a is [2, 3], the expected result is 2.5, but you'll return 2. – John Feminella Aug 27 '09 at 14:03
a = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
a.empty? ? nil : a.reduce(:+)/a.size.to_f
=> 3.375

Solves divide by zero, integer division and is easy to read. Can be easily modified if you choose to have an empty array return 0.

I like this variant too, but it's a little more wordy.

a = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
a.empty? ? nil : [a.reduce(:+), a.size.to_f].reduce(:/)
=> 3.375

arr = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6] average = arr.inject(&:+).to_f / arr.size => 3.375

You could try something like the following:

2.0.0-p648 :009 >   a = [1,2,3,4,5]
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
2.0.0-p648 :010 > (a.sum/a.length).to_f
 => 3.0
[1,2].tap { |a| @asize = a.size }.inject(:+).to_f/@asize

Short but using instance variable

  • 2
    I'd do a_size = nil; [1,2].tap { |a| a_size = a.size }.inject(:+).to_f/a_size rather than create an instance variable. – Andrew Grimm Aug 1 '11 at 23:50

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.