693

I have this DataFrame and want only the records whose EPS column is not NaN:

>>> df
                 STK_ID  EPS  cash
STK_ID RPT_Date                   
601166 20111231  601166  NaN   NaN
600036 20111231  600036  NaN    12
600016 20111231  600016  4.3   NaN
601009 20111231  601009  NaN   NaN
601939 20111231  601939  2.5   NaN
000001 20111231  000001  NaN   NaN

...i.e. something like df.drop(....) to get this resulting dataframe:

                  STK_ID  EPS  cash
STK_ID RPT_Date                   
600016 20111231  600016  4.3   NaN
601939 20111231  601939  2.5   NaN

How do I do that?

13 Answers 13

555

Don't drop, just take the rows where EPS is not NA:

df = df[df['EPS'].notna()]
  • 466
    I'd recommend using pandas.notnull instead of np.isfinite – Wes McKinney Nov 21 '12 at 3:08
  • 10
    Is there any advantage to indexing and copying over dropping? – Robert Muil Jul 31 '15 at 8:15
  • 9
    Creates Error: TypeError: ufunc 'isfinite' not supported for the input types, and the inputs could not be safely coerced to any supported types according to the casting rule ''safe'' – Philipp Schwarz Oct 7 '16 at 13:18
  • 4
    @wes-mckinney could please let me know if dropna () is a better choice over pandas.notnull in this case ? If so, then why ? – stormfield Sep 7 '17 at 11:53
  • 4
    @PhilippSchwarz This error occurs if the column (EPS in the example) contains strings or other types that cannot be digested by np.isfinite(). I recommend to use pandas.notnull() that will handle this more generously. – normanius Apr 5 '18 at 10:02
867

This question is already resolved, but...

...also consider the solution suggested by Wouter in his original comment. The ability to handle missing data, including dropna(), is built into pandas explicitly. Aside from potentially improved performance over doing it manually, these functions also come with a variety of options which may be useful.

In [24]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(10,3))

In [25]: df.iloc[::2,0] = np.nan; df.iloc[::4,1] = np.nan; df.iloc[::3,2] = np.nan;

In [26]: df
Out[26]:
          0         1         2
0       NaN       NaN       NaN
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
4       NaN       NaN  0.050742
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
6       NaN  1.036043       NaN
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
8       NaN       NaN  0.637482
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

In [27]: df.dropna()     #drop all rows that have any NaN values
Out[27]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295

In [28]: df.dropna(how='all')     #drop only if ALL columns are NaN
Out[28]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
4       NaN       NaN  0.050742
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
6       NaN  1.036043       NaN
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
8       NaN       NaN  0.637482
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

In [29]: df.dropna(thresh=2)   #Drop row if it does not have at least two values that are **not** NaN
Out[29]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

In [30]: df.dropna(subset=[1])   #Drop only if NaN in specific column (as asked in the question)
Out[30]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
6       NaN  1.036043       NaN
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

There are also other options (See docs at http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.DataFrame.dropna.html), including dropping columns instead of rows.

Pretty handy!

  • 272
    you can also use df.dropna(subset = ['column_name']). Hope that saves at least one person the extra 5 seconds of 'what am I doing wrong'. Great answer, +1 – James Tobin Jun 18 '14 at 14:07
  • 10
    @JamesTobin, I just spent 20 minutes to write a function for that! The official documentation was very cryptic: "Labels along other axis to consider, e.g. if you are dropping rows these would be a list of columns to include". I was unable to understand, what they meant... – osa Sep 5 '14 at 23:52
  • df.dropna(subset = ['column_name']) is exactly what I was looking for! Thanks! – amalik2205 Dec 8 '19 at 21:09
120

I know this has already been answered, but just for the sake of a purely pandas solution to this specific question as opposed to the general description from Aman (which was wonderful) and in case anyone else happens upon this:

import pandas as pd
df = df[pd.notnull(df['EPS'])]
  • 10
    Actually, the specific answer would be: df.dropna(subset=['EPS']) (based on the general description of Aman, of course this does also work) – joris Apr 23 '14 at 12:53
  • 2
    notnull is also what Wes (author of Pandas) suggested in his comment on another answer. – fantabolous Jul 9 '14 at 3:24
  • This maybe a noob question. But when I do a df[pd.notnull(...) or df.dropna the index gets dropped. So if there was a null value in row-index 10 in a df of length 200. The dataframe after running the drop function has index values from 1 to 9 and then 11 to 200. Anyway to "re-index" it – Aakash Gupta Mar 4 '16 at 6:03
  • you could also do df[pd.notnull(df[df.columns[INDEX]])] where INDEX would be the numbered column if you don't know name – ocean800 Oct 31 '19 at 20:30
53

You can use this:

df.dropna(subset=['EPS'], how='all', inplace=True)
  • 17
    how='all' is redundant here, because you subsetting dataframe only with one field so both 'all' and 'any' will have the same effect. – Anton Protopopov Jan 16 '18 at 12:41
34

Simplest of all solutions:

filtered_df = df[df['EPS'].notnull()]

The above solution is way better than using np.isfinite()

21

You could use dataframe method notnull or inverse of isnull, or numpy.isnan:

In [332]: df[df.EPS.notnull()]
Out[332]:
   STK_ID  RPT_Date  STK_ID.1  EPS  cash
2  600016  20111231    600016  4.3   NaN
4  601939  20111231    601939  2.5   NaN


In [334]: df[~df.EPS.isnull()]
Out[334]:
   STK_ID  RPT_Date  STK_ID.1  EPS  cash
2  600016  20111231    600016  4.3   NaN
4  601939  20111231    601939  2.5   NaN


In [347]: df[~np.isnan(df.EPS)]
Out[347]:
   STK_ID  RPT_Date  STK_ID.1  EPS  cash
2  600016  20111231    600016  4.3   NaN
4  601939  20111231    601939  2.5   NaN
16

Simple and easy way

df.dropna(subset=['EPS'],inplace=True)

source: https://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.DataFrame.dropna.html

10

yet another solution which uses the fact that np.nan != np.nan:

In [149]: df.query("EPS == EPS")
Out[149]:
                 STK_ID  EPS  cash
STK_ID RPT_Date
600016 20111231  600016  4.3   NaN
601939 20111231  601939  2.5   NaN
1

Another version:

df[~df['EPS'].isna()]
  • Why use this over Series.notna() ? – AMC Feb 16 at 3:58
1

In datasets having large number of columns its even better to see how many columns contain null values and how many don't.

print("No. of columns containing null values")
print(len(df.columns[df.isna().any()]))

print("No. of columns not containing null values")
print(len(df.columns[df.notna().all()]))

print("Total no. of columns in the dataframe")
print(len(df.columns))

For example in my dataframe it contained 82 columns, of which 19 contained at least one null value.

Further you can also automatically remove cols and rows depending on which has more null values
Here is the code which does this intelligently:

df = df.drop(df.columns[df.isna().sum()>len(df.columns)],axis = 1)
df = df.dropna(axis = 0).reset_index(drop=True)

Note: Above code removes all of your null values. If you want null values, process them before.

0

It may be added at that '&' can be used to add additional conditions e.g.

df = df[(df.EPS > 2.0) & (df.EPS <4.0)]

Notice that when evaluating the statements, pandas needs parenthesis.

  • 1
    Sorry, but OP want someting else. Btw, your code is wrong, return ValueError: The truth value of a Series is ambiguous. Use a.empty, a.bool(), a.item(), a.any() or a.all().. You need add parenthesis - df = df[(df.EPS > 2.0) & (df.EPS <4.0)], but also it is not answer for this question. – jezrael Mar 16 '16 at 11:52
-1

For some reason none of the previously submitted answers worked for me. This basic solution did:

df = df[df.EPS >= 0]

Though of course that will drop rows with negative numbers, too. So if you want those it's probably smart to add this after, too.

df = df[df.EPS <= 0]
  • This does something completely different, no? – AMC Feb 16 at 3:59
-1

One of the solution can be

df = df[df.isnull().sum(axis=1) <= Cutoff Value]

Another way can be

df= df.dropna(thresh=(df.shape[1] - Cutoff_value))

I hope these are useful.

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