5

I have an .Net library that already has implemented .Item methods, e.g.

namespace Library2
type A() = 
    member m.Item with get(a: string) =   printfn "get a string"
    member m.Item with get(a: int) =   printfn "simple slice"

In the code that uses this library, I want to add one extra method of the same name (therefore it is optional extensions):

#r @"Library2.dll"
open Library2
type A with
    member m.Item with get(a: bool) =
        printfn "get a bool"

The last line of the following example does not compile:

let a = new A()
a.["good"]    
a.[10]
a.[true]

The F# doc says:

Extension methods cannot be virtual or abstract methods. They can overload other methods of the same name, but the compiler gives preference to non-extension methods in the case of an ambiguous call.

This means that I cannot extend .ToString/.GetHashCode with the same type signature, but here I use a different type signature. Why cannot the new method get extended?

  • What I find strange is that Intellisense shows all three overloads. – Daniel Nov 16 '12 at 15:22
  • yes. this confuses me... – Yin Zhu Nov 17 '12 at 3:19
0

I think, the problem is caused by the fact extension methods are implemented as the following (C#):

public static class MyModule
{
    public static void Item(this A a, bool b)
    {
        // whatever
    }
}

The compiler is looking for .Item(...) method, finds it in the original Library2.A class, and fails to search for any extension methods.

Note that if all .Item(...) overloads are extension methods, everything works fine:

module Library2 =
    type A() = 
        member m.dummy = ()

open Library2
type A with
    member m.Item with get(a: string) =   printfn "get a string"
    member m.Item with get(a: int) =   printfn "simple slice"
    member m.Item with get(a: bool) = printfn "get a bool"
0

This seems to be a bug in the compiler. The extension method is there and can be called when you abstain from the nice syntactic sugar that comes with indexers, i.e. this works:

Library:

namespace TestLibrary

type A() = 
    member m.Item with get(a: string) = "string"
    member m.Item with get(a: int)    = "int"

Main:

open TestLibrary

type A with
    member m.Item with get(a: bool) = "bool"

[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv = 
    let a = new A()
    printfn "%s" (a.get_Item "a")
    printfn "%s" (a.get_Item 1)
    printfn "%s" (a.get_Item true)
    System.Console.ReadLine() |> ignore
    0 

My first intuition was that an indexer cannot have unit as return type, but that didn't turn out to be the problem.

0

Strange, I created a similar thing in LinqPad and it worked as you expected.

module ModuleA =

    type A() = 
        member m.Item with get(a: string) = printfn "get a string"
        member m.Item with get(a: int) = printfn "simple slice"

module ModuleB = 
    open ModuleA

    type A with
        member m.Item with get(a: bool) = printfn "get a bool"

open ModuleB

let a = new ModuleA.A()
a.["good"]    
a.[10]
a.[true]

// get a string
// simple slice
// get a bool

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