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I have a question that I don't seem to be able to find the answer to.

I expect this will be an easy answer for some, so I thought I'd throw it up here:

Will all 32-bit processes running on a 64-bit os share the same 4GB address space, or will each 32-bit process have a separate 4GB addressable region?

I'm aware a 32-bit process can only address 232 bytes, but those are pointers to virtual memory rather than physical memory right? or no? (I'm not very sure how things work)

I'm wondering if I can run 2 32-bit processes with 4GB of memory each?

  • depends on the os, but most likely each will get their own separate chunk of 32bit space within the 64bit space – Marc B Nov 16 '12 at 15:08
  • I'm running linux – GP89 Nov 16 '12 at 15:10
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It depends. Every OS is free to implement it's memory space as it sees fit, as long as the hardware is capable of supporting it.

Now, for what most operating systems do in practice (assuming x86 processes running under a x86_64 system):

Will all 32-bit processes running on a 64-bit os share the same 4GB address space, or will each 32-bit process have a separate 4GB addressable region?

No. This would be an extremely uncommon setup. x86_64 mandates paging, and it was extremely common for protected mode (32 bits) x86 operating systems to be paginated and give each process it's own address space anyway. There is no real benefit of doing that, and it would mean all 32 bit processes under such a system would compete for the same ~4GB, which would be less than ideal. Also, it would make it harder to prevent 32 bit processes to read/write into/from each other's memory.

Linux, macOS and Windows all give a distinct address space to each 32 bit process.

I'm aware a 32-bit process can only address 2^32 bytes, but those are pointers to virtual memory rather than physical memory right? or no? (I'm not very sure how things work).

A 32 bit process can indeed address 2^32 bytes. However, using mapping, the kernel can map these addresses, or rather, ranges of addresses (these are called pages) to physical memory.

By default, the paging system of a 32bit x86 processor can address up to 2^32 physical addresses as well. Two extensions came up to allow a system to map more physical addresses: PSE-36 and PAE. Both extend the addressable physical memory from 32 to 36bit. In practice, only PAE was seriously used.

Because PAE expanded the physical address space to 36 bit, it allowed the kernel to use up to 64GiB of memory, as a whole. However, individual processes were still limited to 4GiB.

In practice, the kernel need to stay mapped in memory. It was rather usual for kernels to stay in the upper 512MiB/1GiB, usually at the top of the address space, leading to the common 3GiB memory limit per-process.

Under x86_64, PAE is always enabled, and upgraded to support 48bit virtual addresses and 52 bit physical addresses. There is a proposal from AMD to support 56 bit virtual addresses as an extension in the future.

I'm wondering if I can run 2 32-bit processes with 4GB of memory each?

Yes. Under a 64bit operating system, things are very different. The kernel can stay in very high memory, and don't need to be fully mapped to 32bit processes. Usually, kernels would only map a bunch of pages at the top of the address space for 32 bit processes, to handle syscalls and interrupts. These pages would contain just enough code to get back to long mode (64 bit) and get a full 64 bit address space, from which the kernel can do it's job. Because the kernel only need a few pages and not 512MiB/1GiB of address space to do this, a 32 bit process running under a 64 bit OS can usually use the mast majority of it's 4GiB address space.

Windows allows this, and it would surprise me very much if Linux and/or macOS didn't.

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This depends on a number of things, including the processor and the operating system.

You can have both cases, you can have shared virtual addresses and you can get a slice from a 64 bit address space. I believe this is processor dependent in Linux but I could be wrong. To the 32 bit applications it will seem like they all share the same virtual addresses.

Your second question, can you access 4GB per process? Probably not. The kernel usually has a reserved memory space (1GB on Linux, if I remember correctly). But assuming your question instead is "can each process access 3GB" then the answer is yes, assuming you have enough physical RAM.

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