1

I'm dealing with a really, really weird issue in JavaScript. I'm working on a validator script that loops through a list of fields with jQuery. Each validation is tied to a regular expression on an object that goes like this:

var formats = {

      email: /[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?/g,

      phone: /(?!:\A|\s)(?!(\d{1,6}\s+\D)|((\d{1,2}\s+){2,2}))(((\+\d{1,3})|(\(\+\d{1,3}\)))\s*)?((\d{1,6})|(\(\d{1,6}\)))\/?(([ -.]?)\d{1,5}){1,5}((\s*(#|x|(ext))\.?\s*)\d{1,5})?(?!:(\Z|\w|\b\s))/gm,

      numeric: /(\d+)(((.|,)\d+)+)?/g,

      url: /^((http\:\/\/|https\:\/\/|ftp\:\/\/)|(www.))+(([a-zA-Z0-9\.-]+\.[a-zA-Z]{2,4})|([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}))(\/[a-zA-Z0-9%:\/-_\\?\.'~]*)?$/gi

    };

Then I've created a function that given two parameters, the format and the test subject, returns true or false (merely a wrapper of the test method for the RegExp object):

validy.is = function(what, str) {
    return formats[what].test(str);
};

On a jQuery collection, I have INPUT elements with classes named accordingly to each format:

<input type="text" class="field email" id="field-1-1" />
<input type="text" class="field phone" id="field-1-2" />
...

Then, my validation function goes like this:

    formBuilder.validate = function() {
      console.info("=== STARTING VALIDATE ===");

      var isValid = true;
      var allFields = $(".field", formBuilder.form).toArray();
      var validable = ["email","phone","numeric","url"];

      var errors = {
        "email": "Debés ingresar una dirección de e-mail válida (por ejemplo: juanperez@gmail.com).",
        "phone": "Debés ingresar un número de teléfono válido.",
        "numeric": "Debés ingresar un número.",
        "url": "Debés ingresar una dirección Web válida (por ejemplo: www.misitio.com.ar)."
      };

      for (var f = 0; f < allFields.length; f++) {

        var $field = $(allFields[f]);

        console.info($field);
        console.info("--> Field has classes: " + $field.attr("class"));

        for (var v = 0; v < validable.length; v++) {

          var validableClass = validable[v];

          if ($field.hasClass(validableClass)) {

            console.info("--> Validating against " + validableClass + " with value <<" + $field.val() + ">>");
            console.info("--> Test result: validy.is(validableClass, $field.val()) = " + vw.validy.is(validableClass, $field.val()));
            console.info("--> Last value of isValid = " + isValid);

            isValid = isValid && (validy.is(validableClass, $field.val()) ? true : false);

            console.info("--> Value of isValid is now = " + isValid);
            break;

          };

        }

        console.info("** Status of isValid: " + isValid + " **");

        if (!isValid) {

          console.info("--> Invalid field detected");
          //vw.popoverError($field, "Error", errors[validableClass]);
          break;

        };

      };

      return isValid;

    };

The problem with it is that even when the field value is valid and isValid == true, when it does the isValid == isValid && ... operation, isValid ends up being false.

How can it be possible for a true && true expression to throw false.

I know there must be some stupidity I can't see, but I can't seem to find it. Can anyone lend a hand on this one?

Thanks!

Update 1

Originally, the line:

isValid = isValid && (validy.is(validableClass, $field.val()) ? true : false);

was

isValid &= validy.is(validableClass, $field.val();

Update 2

At some point, apparently the test method is returning 1 or 0 instead of true or false. But I can't pinpoint the exact moment when it happens.

Update 3

So it turns out that I was misusing the &= operator as mentioned in the comments. But...

isValid = isValid && validy.is(validableClass, $field.val());

...returns false when isValid == true and validy.is returns true independently.

Update 4

Changed the validy.is definition according to answer by CaffGeek:

    validy.is = function(what, str) {

      return !!formats[what].test(str);

    };

It had no effect, unfortunately.

11
  • 2
    sidenote: the tertiary variable = condition ? true : false is not necessary - just write variable = condition – jbabey Nov 16 '12 at 18:37
  • I know, before that I was using variable &= condition. – Joel A. Villarreal Bertoldi Nov 16 '12 at 18:40
  • 1
    Step through it in Firebug to see where the variable is going false and see if something is false when you expect it to be true. – Paul Tomblin Nov 16 '12 at 18:42
  • 1
    You should step through the issue using Chrome Dev Tools Debugger to make sure the values you think are being evaluated are correct. developers.google.com/chrome-developer-tools/docs/scripts – adamb Nov 16 '12 at 18:43
  • 1
    Right, but it wasn't clear if you were potentially testing a 'email' field with the 'url' format. I don't think you were though, so that's good. I updated my answer with a streamlined, set based approach to your problem. Not tested, but it simplifies your code, and might help you spot the issue. – CaffGeek Nov 16 '12 at 19:27
1

Try changing

validy.is = function(what, str) {
    return formats[what].test(str);
};

to this to ensure it's a boolean result.

validy.is = function(what, str) {
    return !!formats[what].test(str);
};

I haven't tested this, but you don't need all the loops with jQuery. It's set based. You can simplify your code along this manner.

formBuilder.validate = function() {
    console.info("=== STARTING VALIDATE ===");

    var isValid = true;
    var allFields = $(".field", formBuilder.form).toArray();
    var validable = ["email", "phone", "numeric", "url"];

    var errors = {
        "email": "Debés ingresar una dirección de e-mail válida (por ejemplo: juanperez@gmail.com).",
        "phone": "Debés ingresar un número de teléfono válido.",
        "numeric": "Debés ingresar un número.",
        "url": "Debés ingresar una dirección Web válida (por ejemplo: www.misitio.com.ar)."
    };

    var failedFields = $('EMPTYJQUERYSET');

    $.each(validable, function(index, className) {
        failedFields.add(
            allFields.filter('.' + className).filter(function(index) {
                return ! validy.is(validableClass, $(this).val());
            });
        );
    });

    isValid = !!(failedFields.length == 0);

    console.info("** Status of isValid: " + isValid + " **");

    if (!isValid) {
        console.info("--> Invalid field detected");
        //vw.popoverError($field, "Error", errors[validableClass]);
        break;
    };

    return isValid;
};
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3

I use !!variable a lot to make sure that the variable exists and that it has a positive value.

if it is undefined or false, !!variable will return false, if it is defined and true or has a value (not 0) it will return true

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