128

Is there a way to integrate a border around text like the image below?

text border

263

Use multiple text shadows:

text-shadow: 2px 0 0 #fff, -2px 0 0 #fff, 0 2px 0 #fff, 0 -2px 0 #fff, 1px 1px #fff, -1px -1px 0 #fff, 1px -1px 0 #fff, -1px 1px 0 #fff;

enter image description here

body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  background: #222;
  color: darkred;
  }
h1 {
  text-shadow: 2px 0 0 #fff, -2px 0 0 #fff, 0 2px 0 #fff, 0 -2px 0 #fff, 1px 1px #fff, -1px -1px 0 #fff, 1px -1px 0 #fff, -1px 1px 0 #fff;
}
<h1>test</h1>

Alternatively, you could use text stroke, which only works in webkit:

-webkit-text-stroke-width: 2px;
-webkit-text-stroke-color: #fff;

enter image description here

body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  background: #222;
  color: darkred;
  }
h1 {
  -webkit-text-stroke-width: 2px;
-webkit-text-stroke-color: #fff;
}
<h1>test</h1>

Also read more as CSS-Tricks.

3
  • WORTH NOTING: Please test cross-browser capabilities of these methods... Am having serious issues with clients on IE at least 9.. kinda thinking of going the PNG way.
    – ErickBest
    Sep 2 '13 at 8:58
  • 1
    @ErickBest The second link does mention IE9 problems. Though this page wasn't hard to find on google caniuse.com/css-textshadow
    – AnnanFay
    Apr 5 '14 at 15:58
  • Causes bad display for text with transparency (using rgba).
    – alejnavab
    Dec 2 '16 at 21:12
18

Sure. You could use CSS3 text-shadow :

text-shadow: 0 0 2px #fff;

However it wont show in all browsers right away. Using a script library like Modernizr will help getting it right in most browsers though.

1
  • 2
    I already tried that sir but I what I need is a solid white around text.
    – jho1086
    Nov 17 '12 at 2:27
12

I don't like that much solutions based on multiplying text-shadows, it's not really flexible, it may work for a 2 pixels stroke where directions to add are 8, but with just 3 pixels stroke directions became 16, and so on... Not really confortable to manage.

The right tool exists, it's SVG <text> The browsers' support problem worth nothing in this case, 'cause the usage of text-shadow has its own support problem too, filter: progid:DXImageTransform can be used or IE < 10 but often doesn't work as expected.

To me the best solution remains SVG with a fallback in not-stroked text for older browser:

This kind of approuch works on pratically all versions of Chrome and Firefox, Safari since version 3.04, Opera 8, IE 9

Compared to text-shadow whose supports are: Chrome 4.0, FF 3.5, IE 10, Safari 4.0, Opera 9, it results even more compatible.

.stroke {
  margin: 0;
  font-family: arial;
  font-size:70px;
  font-weight: bold;
  }
  
  svg {
    display: block;
  }
  
  text {
    fill: black;
    stroke: red;
    stroke-width: 3;
  }
<p class="stroke">
  <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="700" height="72" viewBox="0 0 700 72">
    <text x="0" y="70">Stroked text</text>
  </svg>
</p>

1
  • 1
    thank you for sharing your solution. I think your right it is more flexible. But most of the time it is more efficient to use CSS. I will try to use SVG later.
    – jho1086
    Feb 26 '18 at 11:10
7
text-shadow: -1px 0 black, 0 1px black, 1px 0 black, 0 -1px black;
2
  • 3
    Can you also add an explanation?
    – Robert
    May 28 '15 at 10:41
  • A slight tweak on this, using a dark grey #444 and adding another text shadow at 0 0 worked well for me
    – danday74
    Jun 15 '21 at 12:15
5

The following will cover all browsers worth covering:

text-shadow: 0 0 2px #fff; /* Firefox 3.5+, Opera 9+, Safari 1+, Chrome, IE10 */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Glow(Color=#ffffff,Strength=1); /* IE<10 */

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