23

I'm trying to familiarize myself with c#'s new await/async keywords, and I've found several aspects which I can't quite understand.

  1. Let's start with race conditions:

    Stream s=...
    ...
    for(int i=0;i<100;i++)
    {
        s.WriteAsync(new byte[]{i},0,1);
    }
    

    will this work as expected all the time (e.g. write to the file 12345..... and not 13254 or something)?

    The second thing is that async function executes synchronously if it does not contain await operator. And, according to microsoft documentation, async functions always execute in the caller thread (as compared to BeginInvoke). This brings me to 3 next questions:

  2. How much of an async function is executed before it releases to the caller function?

    async void MyAsyncFunction()
    {
        Operation1();
        Operation2();
        Operation3();
        ....
        Stream s=...;
        await s.WriteAsync(....);
    }
    

    In the articles about await/async that I've read, it's said that async functions without await operator execute sequentially, and with async/await return imminently. But it's nagging at me that MyAsyncFunction may always execute Operation1...Operation3 before releasing as it hits await s.WriteAsync.

  3. What if I use Thread.Sleep in the async function like this:

    async void DoStuff()
    {
        Stream s=...;
        ...
        await s.WriteAsync(....);
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
        ....
    }
    

    Will Thread.Sleep block the whole thread in which it is executed or just the async function?

  4. What if I use semaphore.Wait() in one of the async functions and it will expect for the semaphore to be released by an other async function. Will this behave as it would with threads, or will it cause deadlock?

  5. await does not work outside of async functions. Why?

  • 4
    You've asked too many questions in one post - it would be hard to answer them all in a coherent fashion. It sounds like you should actually do some more research (there's plenty of information on the Visual Studio Async home page, for example) and then ask one specific question at a time. – Jon Skeet Nov 17 '12 at 9:31
  • 1
    Umm. async/await is threading. Just a more efficient use of threads. – John Saunders Nov 17 '12 at 9:42
  • 3
    @JohnSaunders see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/hh191443.aspx : The async and await keywords don't cause additional threads to be created. Async methods don't require multithreading because an async method doesn't run on its own thread. The method runs on the current synchronization context and uses time on the thread only when the method is active. – Arsen Zahray Nov 17 '12 at 9:51
  • @JonSkeet I actually read a lot on stuff on this, and these are questions I'm left AFTER reading the documentation. But may be, I haven't found the right documentation after all. Could you point me? – Arsen Zahray Nov 17 '12 at 9:52
  • @AdrianCiura I just quoted it in the comments above – Arsen Zahray Nov 17 '12 at 10:33
16

I recommend you read my async intro.

will this work as expected all the time (e.g. write to the file 12345..... and not 13254 or something)?

No. You need to await the calls to WriteAsync.

How much of an async function is executed before it releases to the caller function?

Until it awaits an operation that is not already completed.

Will Thread.Sleep block the whole thread in which it is executed or just the async function?

Thread.Sleep - and all other blocking methods - will block the async method and the thread that is executing it.

As a general rule, do not use any blocking methods within an async method.

What if I use semaphore.Wait() in one of the async functions and it will expect for the semaphore to be released by an other async function. Will this behave as it would with threads, or will it cause deadlock?

It totally depends on your contexts. Wait is a blocking method, so if the "other" async method requires the context held by the blocked method, then you will deadlock.

Note that SemaphoreSlim is async-friendly; you can use WaitAsync instead of Wait.

await does not work outside of async functions. Why?

Because the async keyword enables the await keyword. This was done to minimize the impact of new keywords on the C# language and for code readability.

15

You can find answer for your questions about awaitoperator in the following post by Eric Lippert, where he says that:

The “await” operator … does not mean “this method now blocks the current thread until the asynchronous operation returns”. That would be making the asynchronous operation back into a synchronous operation, which is precisely what we are attempting to avoid. Rather, it means the opposite of that; it means “if the task we are awaiting has not yet completed then sign up the rest of this method as the continuation of that task, and then return to your caller immediately; the task will invoke the continuation when it completes. -- Eric Lippert

0

In short, it seems like the answer is "very". While the following may not answer all your questions, I think it applies to a general enough use case. Think of your Stream instead of the network IO they're referring to.

In the case of overlapped network IO, an IO completion port will be used, the callback being triggered by a hardware interupt.

This means that while we "await" completion, a thread will not be consumed. [...]

It is possible to do everything on 1 thread. [...] It will however depend on the platform, the "awaiter" implementation & the synchronization context being used.

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/async/thread/a46c8a54-f8d4-4fa9-8746-64d6a3a7540d/

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