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I am writing a C# application. I have (a kind of) logging class. and this logging class will be used by many threads. How to make this class thread safe? Should I make it as singleton? what are the best practices there? Is there a document that I can read about how to make it thread-safe?

Thanks

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  • 8
    The singleton pattern does not imply thread-safety. – dtb Aug 27 '09 at 22:24
  • 2
    Start by carefully defining what you mean by "thread safe". People use this term like it means something specific, when in fact, it just means "works correctly in scenario X". Without a spec for "correctly" and a statement of what X is, you can't actually implement something and know that you solved a problem that you really have. – Eric Lippert Aug 27 '09 at 22:47
  • 1
    Check out this great article by Joseph Albahari. About half-way into the article is a great section on "Thread Safety" – Kevin Babcock Jan 4 '13 at 6:48
18

In C#, any object can be used to protect a "critical section", or in other words, code that must not be executed by two threads at the same time.

For example, the following will synchronize access to the SharedLogger.Write method, so only a single thread is logging a message at any given time.

public class SharedLogger : ILogger
{
   public static SharedLogger Instance = new SharedLogger();

   public void Write(string s)
   {
      lock (_lock)
      {
         _writer.Write(s);
      }
   }

   private SharedLogger() 
   { 
      _writer = new LogWriter();
   }

   private object _lock;
   private LogWriter _writer;
}
  • the above code is a good example. – Maciek Aug 27 '09 at 22:28
  • This is good but you can just make _lock and _writer static instead of having to deal with making this thing a singleton. Using an existing logger would still be a lot easier though. – Jeff Tucker Aug 27 '09 at 22:29
  • 4
    I agree about using an existing logger implementation, but if he is dealing in multi-threaded code, he will eventually need to know how to properly synchronize access to various resources, and this same process can be applied elsewhere... – jeremyalan Aug 27 '09 at 22:32
  • ...and regarding using a Singleton vs. static class, I've added the previously forgotten ILogger interface to show that, in this scenario, it may be desirable to swap out different implementations of ILogger. – jeremyalan Aug 27 '09 at 22:36
11

I'm not sure I can add anything to what has already been said about making a logging class thread-safe. As has been stated, to do this you must synchronize access to the resource, i.e., the log file, so that only one thread attempts to log to it at a time. The C# lock keyword is the proper way to do this.

However, I will address (1) the singleton approach and (2) the usability of the approach that you ultimately decide to use.

(1) If your application writes all of its log messages to a single log file, then the singleton pattern is definitely the route to go. The log file will be opened at startup and closed at shutdown, and the singleton pattern fits this concept of operations perfectly. As @dtb pointed out, though, remember that making a class a singleton does not guarantee thread safety. Use the lock keyword for that.

(2) As for the usability of the approach, consider this suggested solution:

public class SharedLogger : ILogger
{
   public static SharedLogger Instance = new SharedLogger();
   public void Write(string s)
   {
      lock (_lock)
      {
         _writer.Write(s);
      }
   }
   private SharedLogger()
   {
       _writer = new LogWriter();
   }
   private object _lock;
   private LogWriter _writer;
}

Let me first say that this approach is generally ok. It defines a singleton instance of SharedLogger via the Instance static variable and prevents others from instantiating the class by virtue of the private constructor. This is the essence of the singleton pattern, but I would strongly recommend reading and following Jon Skeet's advice regarding singletons in C# before going too far.

However, what I want to focus on is the usability of this solution. By 'usability,' I'm referring to the way one would use this implementation to log a message. Consider what the invocation looks like:

SharedLogger.Instance.Write("log message");

That whole 'Instance' part just looks wrong, but there's no way to avoid it given the implementation. Instead, consider this alternative:

public static class SharedLogger : ILogger
{
   private static LogWriter _writer = new LogWriter();
   private static object _lock = new object();
   public static void Write(string s)
   {
       lock (_lock)
       {
           _writer.Write(s);
       }
   }
}

Notice that the class is now static, which means that all of its members and methods have to be static. It's not substantively different from the earlier example, but consider its usage.

SharedLogger.Write("log message");

That's much simpler to code against.

The point is not to denigrate the former solution, but to suggest that the usability of whatever solution you choose is an important aspect not to be overlooked. A good, usable API can make code simpler to write, more elegant, and easier to maintain.

  • I agree with this...Much less nonsense. – Kelly Elton Jan 19 '12 at 1:32
  • Static classes wherever possible as a rule of thumb. – Kelly Elton Jan 19 '12 at 1:33
  • can't we just use lock(this) instead of lock(_this)? (using instant as the object to lock?) – Silent Byte Jun 12 '13 at 14:07
  • creating an instance and doing nothing with it does look wrong even to a naked eye. This is much cleaner at the least – LastTribunal Jun 26 '15 at 1:33
  • How would you unit test if you are full of static classes? Making mock classes out of interfaces seems like the only option and non-sense. – C3PO Oct 20 '17 at 8:00
8

I would use an off the shelf logger for this, since there are several that are rock solid and simple to use. No need to roll your own. I reccomend Log4Net.

  • Log4Net is great, I've used it a number of times and always been happy with it. – Jeff Tucker Aug 27 '09 at 22:30
  • 10
    I agree with this in regards to logging. But it doesn't answer the question. – Eric Schoonover Aug 27 '09 at 22:44
  • Log4Net is the shiznit! – Crackerjack Apr 6 '12 at 22:40
6
  • Try and do most computation using local variables and then alter the state of the object in one quick locked block.
  • Keep in mind that some variables might change between when you read them and when you get to altering the state.
  • +1 for keeping second line in mind, i wasted 2weeks understanding that – Silent Byte Jun 12 '13 at 14:00
3

use lock() so that multiple threads will not use the logging at the same time

2

Pursuant to BCS' answer:

BCS is describing the case of a stateless object. Such an object is intrinsically thread safe because it has no variables of it's own that can be clobbered by calls from different theads.

The logger described does have a file handle (sorry, not C# user, maybe it's called IDiskFileResource or some such MS-ism) which it must serialize use of.

So, separate the storage of messages from the logic that writes them to the log file. The logic should only operate on one message at a time.

One way to do it is: if the logger object were to keep a queue of message objects, and the logger object merely has the logic to pop a message off the queue, then extract the useful stuff from a message object, then write that to the log, then look for another message in the queue - then you can make that thread safe by having the queue's add/remove/queue_size/etc operations thread safe. It would require the logger class, a message class and a thread safe queue (which is probably a third class, an instance of which is a member variable of the logger class).

  • Another option (in some cases) is to have the logger call generate the full record in local memory and then write it to the output stream in a single call. IIRC most OS'es provide a system call that will do an atomic write to a stream for (almost?) any case but resource exhaustion, and then you have other problems. – BCS Nov 15 '10 at 21:22
1

in my opinion the provided code above is not thread safe any more: in the previous solution you had to instatiate a new object of SharedLogger and the method Write existed once for every object.

Now you just have one Write method, which is used by all threads, example:

thread 1: SharedLogger.Write("Thread 1")

thread 2: SharedLogger.Write("Thread 2");

   public static void Write(string s)
   {
       // thread 1 is interrupted here <=
       lock (_lock)
       {
           _writer.Write(s);
       }
   }
  • thread 1 wants to write a message, but is interrupted by thread 2 (see comment)
  • thread 2 overrides the message of thread 1 and is interrupted by thread 1

  • thread 1 gets the lock and writes "Thread 2"

  • thread 1 releases the lock
  • thread 2 gets the lock and writes "Thread 2"
  • thread 2 releases the lock

correct me when I am wrong ...

1

If performance isn't' the main issue, for instance if the class isn't under a lot of load, just do this:

Make your class inherit ContextBoundObject

Apply this attribute to your class [Synchronization]

Your entire class is now only accessible to one thread at a time.

It's really more useful for diagnosis, as speed wise it's nearly the worst case...but to quickly determine "is this weird issue a racing condition", throw it on, re run the test.. if the problem goes away... you know it's a threading problem...

A more performant option is to make your logging class have a thread safe message queue ( that accepts logging messages, then just pull them out and process them sequentially...

For example the ConcurrentQueue class in the new parallelism stuff is a good thread safe queue.

Or user log4net RollingLogFileAppender, which is already thread safe.

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