143

I have a sorted JavaScript array, and want to insert one more item into the array such the resulting array remains sorted. I could certainly implement a simple quicksort-style insertion function:

var array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];
var element = 3.5;
function insert(element, array) {
  array.splice(locationOf(element, array) + 1, 0, element);
  return array;
}

function locationOf(element, array, start, end) {
  start = start || 0;
  end = end || array.length;
  var pivot = parseInt(start + (end - start) / 2, 10);
  if (end-start <= 1 || array[pivot] === element) return pivot;
  if (array[pivot] < element) {
    return locationOf(element, array, pivot, end);
  } else {
    return locationOf(element, array, start, pivot);
  }
}

console.log(insert(element, array));

[WARNING] this code has a bug when trying to insert to the beginning of the array, e.g. insert(2, [3, 7 ,9]) produces incorrect [ 3, 2, 7, 9 ].

However, I noticed that implementations of the Array.sort function might potentially do this for me, and natively:

var array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];
var element = 3.5;
function insert(element, array) {
  array.push(element);
  array.sort(function(a, b) {
    return a - b;
  });
  return array;
}

console.log(insert(element, array));

Is there a good reason to choose the first implementation over the second?

Edit: Note that for the general case, an O(log(n)) insertion (as implemented in the first example) will be faster than a generic sorting algorithm; however this is not necessarily the case for JavaScript in particular. Note that:

  • Best case for several insertion algorithms is O(n), which is still significantly different from O(log(n)), but not quite as bad as O(n log(n)) as mentioned below. It would come down to the particular sorting algorithm used (see Javascript Array.sort implementation?)
  • The sort method in JavaScript is a native function, so potentially realizing huge benefits -- O(log(n)) with a huge coefficient can still be much worse than O(n) for reasonably sized data sets.
| |
  • using splice in the second implementation is a bit wasteful. Why not use push? – Breton Aug 28 '09 at 1:30
  • Good point, I just copied it from the first. – Elliot Kroo Aug 28 '09 at 4:14
  • 4
    Anything containing splice() (e.g. your 1st example) is already O(n). Even if it doesn't internally create a new copy of the entire array, it potentially has to shunt all n items back 1 position if the element is to be inserted in position 0. Maybe it's fast because it's a native function and the constant is low, but it's O(n) nonetheless. – j_random_hacker Jan 2 '11 at 8:19
  • 6
    also, for future reference for people using this code, the code has a bug when trying to insert to the beginning of the array. Look further down for the corrected code. – Pinocchio Apr 6 '14 at 0:36
  • 3
    Don't use parseInt use Math.floor instead. Math.floor is much faster than parseInt: jsperf.com/test-parseint-and-math-floor – Hubert Schölnast Sep 1 '17 at 10:08

14 Answers 14

58

Just as a single data point, for kicks I tested this out inserting 1000 random elements into an array of 100,000 pre-sorted numbers using the two methods using Chrome on Windows 7:

First Method:
~54 milliseconds
Second Method:
~57 seconds

So, at least on this setup, the native method doesn't make up for it. This is true even for small data sets, inserting 100 elements into an array of 1000:

First Method:
1 milliseconds
Second Method:
34 milliseconds
| |
  • 1
    arrays.sort sounds quite terrible – njzk2 Oct 11 '12 at 7:41
  • 2
    Seems that the array.splice must be doing something really clever, to insert a single element within 54 microseconds. – gnasher729 Jul 21 '15 at 11:03
  • @gnasher729 - I don't think Javascript arrays are really the same as physically continuous arrays like we have in C. I think the JS engines can implement them as a hash map/dictionary enabling the quick insert. – Ian Sep 26 '17 at 17:47
  • 1
    when you use a comparator function with Array.prototype.sort, you lose the benefits of C++ because the JS function is called so much. – aleclarson Jun 14 '18 at 14:57
  • How does the First Method compare now that Chrome uses TimSort? From TimSort Wikipedia: "In the best case, which occurs when the input is already sorted, [TimSort] runs in linear time". – poshest Feb 5 at 11:40
48

Simple (Demo):

function sortedIndex(array, value) {
    var low = 0,
        high = array.length;

    while (low < high) {
        var mid = (low + high) >>> 1;
        if (array[mid] < value) low = mid + 1;
        else high = mid;
    }
    return low;
}
| |
  • 4
    Nice touch. I never heard of using bitwise operators to find the mid value of two numbers. Normally I would just multiply by 0.5. Is there a significant performance boost doing it this way? – Jackson Jan 24 '16 at 22:45
  • 2
    @Jackson x >>> 1 is binary right shift by 1 position, which is effectively just a division by 2. e.g. for 11: 1011 -> 101 results to 5. – Qwerty Jan 31 '16 at 17:16
  • 3
    @Qwerty @Web_Designer Being already on this track, could you explain the difference between >>> 1 and (seen here and there) >> 1? – yckart Feb 26 '16 at 14:02
  • 4
    >>> is an unsigned right shift, whereas >> is sign-extending - it all boils down to in-memory representation of negative numbers, where the high bit is set if negative. So if you shift 0b1000 right 1 place with >> you'll get 0b1100, if you instead use >>> you'll get 0b0100. While in the case given in the answer it doesn't really matter (the number being shifted with neither be larger than a signed 32-bit positive integer's max value nor negative), it's important to use the right one in those two cases (you need to pick which case you need to handle). – asherkin Feb 26 '16 at 23:43
  • 2
    @asherkin - This is not right: "if you shift 0b1000 right 1 place with >> you'll get 0b1100". No, you get 0b0100. The result of the different right shift operators will be the same for all values except negative numbers and numbers greater than 2^31 (ie, numbers with a 1 in the first bit). – gilly3 Aug 2 '16 at 22:32
29

Very good and remarkable question with a very interesting discussion! I also was using the Array.sort() function after pushing a single element in an array with some thousands of objects.

I had to extend your locationOf function for my purpose because of having complex objects and therefore the need for a compare function like in Array.sort():

function locationOf(element, array, comparer, start, end) {
    if (array.length === 0)
        return -1;

    start = start || 0;
    end = end || array.length;
    var pivot = (start + end) >> 1;  // should be faster than dividing by 2

    var c = comparer(element, array[pivot]);
    if (end - start <= 1) return c == -1 ? pivot - 1 : pivot;

    switch (c) {
        case -1: return locationOf(element, array, comparer, start, pivot);
        case 0: return pivot;
        case 1: return locationOf(element, array, comparer, pivot, end);
    };
};

// sample for objects like {lastName: 'Miller', ...}
var patientCompare = function (a, b) {
    if (a.lastName < b.lastName) return -1;
    if (a.lastName > b.lastName) return 1;
    return 0;
};
| |
  • 7
    It seems worth noting, for the record, that this version DOES work correctly when trying to insert to the beginning of the array. (It's worth mentioning it because the version in the original question has a bug and doesn't work correctly for that case.) – garyrob May 1 '14 at 14:58
  • 3
    I'm not sure if my implementation was different, but I needed to change the ternary to return c == -1 ? pivot : pivot + 1; in order to return the correct index. Otherwise for an array with length 1 the function would return -1 or 0. – Niel Jul 13 '15 at 18:08
  • 3
    @James: The parameters start and end are only used on recursive call and will not be used on inital call. Because these are index values for the array they must be of type integer and on recursive call this is implicitly given. – kwrl Apr 5 '16 at 10:12
  • 1
    @TheRedPea: no, I meant >> 1 should be faster (or not slower) than / 2 – kwrl Apr 17 '17 at 15:45
  • 1
    I can see a potential issue with the result of comparer function. In this algorithm it is compared to +-1 but it could be arbitrary value <0 / >0. See compare function. The problematic part is not only the switch statement but also the line: if (end - start <= 1) return c == -1 ? pivot - 1 : pivot; where c is compared to -1 as well. – eXavier Apr 3 '18 at 14:37
19

There's a bug in your code. It should read:

function locationOf(element, array, start, end) {
  start = start || 0;
  end = end || array.length;
  var pivot = parseInt(start + (end - start) / 2, 10);
  if (array[pivot] === element) return pivot;
  if (end - start <= 1)
    return array[pivot] > element ? pivot - 1 : pivot;
  if (array[pivot] < element) {
    return locationOf(element, array, pivot, end);
  } else {
    return locationOf(element, array, start, pivot);
  }
}

Without this fix the code will never be able to insert an element at the beginning of the array.

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  • why are you or-ing a int with 0? i.e. what does start || 0 do? – Pinocchio Apr 6 '14 at 0:38
  • 3
    @Pinocchio: start || 0 is a short equivalent of: if(!start) start = 0; - However, the "longer" version is more efficent, because it does not assign a variable to itself. – SuperNova Apr 9 '14 at 13:36
11

I know this is an old question that has an answer already, and there are a number of other decent answers. I see some answers that propose that you can solve this problem by looking up the correct insertion index in O(log n) - you can, but you can't insert in that time, because the array needs to be partially copied out to make space.

Bottom line: If you really need O(log n) inserts and deletes into a sorted array, you need a different data structure - not an array. You should use a B-Tree. The performance gains you will get from using a B-Tree for a large data set, will dwarf any of the improvements offered here.

If you must use an array. I offer the following code, based on insertion sort, which works, if and only if the array is already sorted. This is useful for the case when you need to resort after every insert:

function addAndSort(arr, val) {
    arr.push(val);
    for (i = arr.length - 1; i > 0 && arr[i] < arr[i-1]; i--) {
        var tmp = arr[i];
        arr[i] = arr[i-1];
        arr[i-1] = tmp;
    }
    return arr;
}

It should operate in O(n), which I think is the best you can do. Would be nicer if js supported multiple assignment. here's an example to play with:

Update:

this might be faster:

function addAndSort2(arr, val) {
    arr.push(val);
    i = arr.length - 1;
    item = arr[i];
    while (i > 0 && item < arr[i-1]) {
        arr[i] = arr[i-1];
        i -= 1;
    }
    arr[i] = item;
    return arr;
}

Updated JS Bin link

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  • In JavaScript the insertion sort you propose will be slower than the binary search & splice method, because splice has a fast implementation. – trincot May 7 '19 at 17:27
  • unless javascript somehow can break the laws of time complexity, i'm skeptical . Do you have a runnable example of how the binary search and splice method is faster? – domoarigato May 7 '19 at 21:41
  • I take back my second comment ;-) Indeed, there will be an array size beyond which a B-tree solution will outperform the splice solution. – trincot May 8 '19 at 17:51
9

Your insertion function assumes that the given array is sorted, it searches directly for the location where the new element can be inserted, usually by just looking at a few of the elements in the array.

The general sort function of an array can't take these shortcuts. Obviously it at least has to inspect all elements in the array to see if they are already correctly ordered. This fact alone makes the general sort slower than the insertion function.

A generic sort algorithm is usually on average O(n ⋅ log(n)) and depending on the implementation it might actually be the worst case if the array is already sorted, leading to complexities of O(n2). Directly searching for the insertion position instead has just a complexity of O(log(n)), so it will always be much faster.

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  • It's worth noting that inserting an element into an array has a complexity of O(n), so the end result should be about the same. – NemPlayer Mar 15 at 17:58
5

For a small number of items, the difference is pretty trivial. However, if you're inserting a lot of items, or working with a very large array, calling .sort() after each insertion will cause a tremendous amount of overhead.

I ended up writing a pretty slick binary search/insert function for this exact purpose, so I thought I'd share it. Since it uses a while loop instead of recursion, there is no overheard for extra function calls, so I think the performance will be even better than either of the originally posted methods. And it emulates the default Array.sort() comparator by default, but accepts a custom comparator function if desired.

function insertSorted(arr, item, comparator) {
    if (comparator == null) {
        // emulate the default Array.sort() comparator
        comparator = function(a, b) {
            if (typeof a !== 'string') a = String(a);
            if (typeof b !== 'string') b = String(b);
            return (a > b ? 1 : (a < b ? -1 : 0));
        };
    }

    // get the index we need to insert the item at
    var min = 0;
    var max = arr.length;
    var index = Math.floor((min + max) / 2);
    while (max > min) {
        if (comparator(item, arr[index]) < 0) {
            max = index;
        } else {
            min = index + 1;
        }
        index = Math.floor((min + max) / 2);
    }

    // insert the item
    arr.splice(index, 0, item);
};

If you're open to using other libraries, lodash provides sortedIndex and sortedLastIndex functions, which could be used in place of the while loop. The two potential downsides are 1) performance isn't as good as my method (thought I'm not sure how much worse it is) and 2) it does not accept a custom comparator function, only a method for getting the value to compare (using the default comparator, I assume).

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  • the call to arr.splice() is surely O(n) time complexity. – domoarigato May 18 '17 at 8:34
4

Here are a few thoughts: Firstly, if you're genuinely concerned about the runtime of your code, be sure to know what happens when you call the built-in functions! I don't know up from down in javascript, but a quick google of the splice function returned this, which seems to indicate that you're creating a whole new array each call! I don't know if it actually matters, but it is certainly related to efficiency. I see that Breton, in the comments, has already pointed this out, but it certainly holds for whatever array-manipulating function you choose.

Anyways, onto actually solving the problem.

When I read that you wanted to sort, my first thought is to use insertion sort!. It is handy because it runs in linear time on sorted, or nearly-sorted lists. As your arrays will have only 1 element out of order, that counts as nearly-sorted (except for, well, arrays of size 2 or 3 or whatever, but at that point, c'mon). Now, implementing the sort isn't too too bad, but it is a hassle you may not want to deal with, and again, I don't know a thing about javascript and if it will be easy or hard or whatnot. This removes the need for your lookup function, and you just push (as Breton suggested).

Secondly, your "quicksort-esque" lookup function seems to be a binary search algorithm! It is a very nice algorithm, intuitive and fast, but with one catch: it is notoriously difficult to implement correctly. I won't dare say if yours is correct or not (I hope it is, of course! :)), but be wary if you want to use it.

Anyways, summary: using "push" with insertion sort will work in linear time (assuming the rest of the array is sorted), and avoid any messy binary search algorithm requirements. I don't know if this is the best way (underlying implementation of arrays, maybe a crazy built-in function does it better, who knows), but it seems reasonable to me. :) - Agor.

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  • 1
    +1 because anything containing splice() is already O(n). Even if it doesn't internally create a new copy of the entire array, it potentially has to shunt all n items back 1 position if the element is to be inserted in position 0. – j_random_hacker Jan 2 '11 at 8:19
  • I believe insertion sort is also O(n) best case, and O(n^2) worst case (though the OP's use case is probably best case). – domoarigato May 18 '17 at 8:38
  • Minus one for talking down to the OP. The first paragraph felt like an unnessessary admonishment of for not knowing how splice works under the hood – Matt Zera Nov 13 '19 at 22:35
2

Here's a comparison of four different algorithms for accomplishing this: https://jsperf.com/sorted-array-insert-comparison/1

Algorithms

Naive is always horrible. It seems for small array sizes, the other three dont differ too much, but for larger arrays, the last 2 outperform the simple linear approach.

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2

Here's a version that uses lodash.

const _ = require('lodash');
sortedArr.splice(_.sortedIndex(sortedArr,valueToInsert) ,0,valueToInsert);

note: sortedIndex does a binary search.

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1

The best data structure I can think of is an indexed skip list which maintains the insertion properties of linked lists with a hierarchy structure that enables log time operations. On average, search, insertion, and random access lookups can be done in O(log n) time.

An order statistic tree enables log time indexing with a rank function.

If you do not need random access but you need O(log n) insertion and searching for keys, you can ditch the array structure and use any kind of binary search tree.

None of the answers that use array.splice() are efficient at all since that is on average O(n) time. What's the time complexity of array.splice() in Google Chrome?

| |
  • How does this answer Is there a good reason to choose [splice into location found] over [push & sort]? – greybeard Jan 23 at 3:17
  • 1
    @greybeard It answers the title. cynically neither choice is efficient. – qwr Jan 23 at 3:23
  • Neither option could be efficient if they involve copying many elements of an array over. – qwr Jan 23 at 3:28
1

Here is my function, uses binary search to find item and then inserts appropriately:

function binaryInsert(val, arr){
    let mid, 
    len=arr.length,
    start=0,
    end=len-1;
    while(start <= end){
        mid = Math.floor((end + start)/2);
        if(val <= arr[mid]){
            if(val >= arr[mid-1]){
                arr.splice(mid,0,val);
                break;
            }
            end = mid-1;
        }else{
            if(val <= arr[mid+1]){
                arr.splice(mid+1,0,val);
                break;
            }
            start = mid+1;
        }
    }
    return arr;
}

console.log(binaryInsert(16, [
    5,   6,  14,  19, 23, 44,
   35,  51,  86,  68, 63, 71,
   87, 117
 ]));

| |
0

Don't re-sort after every item, its overkill..

If there is only one item to insert, you can find the location to insert using binary search. Then use memcpy or similar to bulk copy the remaining items to make space for the inserted one. The binary search is O(log n), and the copy is O(n), giving O(n + log n) total. Using the methods above, you are doing a re-sort after every insertion, which is O(n log n).

Does it matter? Lets say you are randomly inserting k elements, where k = 1000. The sorted list is 5000 items.

  • Binary search + Move = k*(n + log n) = 1000*(5000 + 12) = 5,000,012 = ~5 million ops
  • Re-sort on each = k*(n log n) = ~60 million ops

If the k items to insert arrive whenever, then you must do search+move. However, if you are given a list of k items to insert into a sorted array - ahead of time - then you can do even better. Sort the k items, separately from the already sorted n array. Then do a scan sort, in which you move down both sorted arrays simultaneously, merging one into the other. - One-step Merge sort = k log k + n = 9965 + 5000 = ~15,000 ops

Update: Regarding your question.
First method = binary search+move = O(n + log n). Second method = re-sort = O(n log n) Exactly explains the timings you're getting.

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  • yes, but no, it depends on your sort algorithm. Using a bubble sort in the reverse order, your sort if the last element is not sorted is always in o(n) – njzk2 Oct 11 '12 at 7:40
-1
function insertOrdered(array, elem) {
    let _array = array;
    let i = 0;
    while ( i < array.length && array[i] < elem ) {i ++};
    _array.splice(i, 0, elem);
    return _array;
}
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