164

I want to find all values in a Pandas dataframe that contain whitespace (any arbitrary amount) and replace those values with NaNs.

Any ideas how this can be improved?

Basically I want to turn this:

                   A    B    C
2000-01-01 -0.532681  foo    0
2000-01-02  1.490752  bar    1
2000-01-03 -1.387326  foo    2
2000-01-04  0.814772  baz     
2000-01-05 -0.222552         4
2000-01-06 -1.176781  qux     

Into this:

                   A     B     C
2000-01-01 -0.532681   foo     0
2000-01-02  1.490752   bar     1
2000-01-03 -1.387326   foo     2
2000-01-04  0.814772   baz   NaN
2000-01-05 -0.222552   NaN     4
2000-01-06 -1.176781   qux   NaN

I've managed to do it with the code below, but man is it ugly. It's not Pythonic and I'm sure it's not the most efficient use of pandas either. I loop through each column and do boolean replacement against a column mask generated by applying a function that does a regex search of each value, matching on whitespace.

for i in df.columns:
    df[i][df[i].apply(lambda i: True if re.search('^\s*$', str(i)) else False)]=None

It could be optimized a bit by only iterating through fields that could contain empty strings:

if df[i].dtype == np.dtype('object')

But that's not much of an improvement

And finally, this code sets the target strings to None, which works with Pandas' functions like fillna(), but it would be nice for completeness if I could actually insert a NaN directly instead of None.

13 Answers 13

217

I think df.replace() does the job, since pandas 0.13:

df = pd.DataFrame([
    [-0.532681, 'foo', 0],
    [1.490752, 'bar', 1],
    [-1.387326, 'foo', 2],
    [0.814772, 'baz', ' '],     
    [-0.222552, '   ', 4],
    [-1.176781,  'qux', '  '],         
], columns='A B C'.split(), index=pd.date_range('2000-01-01','2000-01-06'))

# replace field that's entirely space (or empty) with NaN
print(df.replace(r'^\s*$', np.nan, regex=True))

Produces:

                   A    B   C
2000-01-01 -0.532681  foo   0
2000-01-02  1.490752  bar   1
2000-01-03 -1.387326  foo   2
2000-01-04  0.814772  baz NaN
2000-01-05 -0.222552  NaN   4
2000-01-06 -1.176781  qux NaN

As Temak pointed it out, use df.replace(r'^\s+$', np.nan, regex=True) in case your valid data contains white spaces.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    regex is a boolean flag. Maybe you mean pd.Series(["1", "#", "9", " .", None]).replace(r"( +\.)|#", "X", regex=True).values which gives ['1', 'X', '9', 'X', None] – patricksurry Nov 3 '15 at 16:27
  • 2
    2 years on, I've changed the accepted answer to this, now that pandas supports it. Thanks! – Chris Clark Nov 4 '15 at 19:50
  • 37
    NOTE: if you don't want an element containing space in the middle to be replaced with NaN use df.replace(r'^\s+$', np.nan, regex=True) – Temak Aug 1 '16 at 10:13
  • 7
    I tried to use this, but found out that r'^\s*$' should be the expression to use. without ^ and $ it will match any string with two consecutive blanks. Also changed + to * to include the empty string "" in the list of things to convert to NaN – Master Yogurt Nov 18 '16 at 17:36
  • 1
    I am trying your solution in my code, but it has no effect. I am trying "energy["Energy Supply"].replace(to_replace = "...", value = np.NaN)". Wanting to change the string "..." to NaN values, but it does nothing and returns the same dataframe. – Archan Joshi Jan 7 '18 at 10:41
57

If you want to replace an empty string and records with only spaces, the correct answer is!:

df = df.replace(r'^\s*$', np.nan, regex=True)

The accepted answer

df.replace(r'\s+', np.nan, regex=True)

Does not replace an empty string!, you can try yourself with the given example slightly updated:

df = pd.DataFrame([
    [-0.532681, 'foo', 0],
    [1.490752, 'bar', 1],
    [-1.387326, 'fo o', 2],
    [0.814772, 'baz', ' '],     
    [-0.222552, '   ', 4],
    [-1.176781,  'qux', ''],         
], columns='A B C'.split(), index=pd.date_range('2000-01-01','2000-01-06'))

Note, also that 'fo o' is not replaced with Nan, though it contains a space. Further note, that a simple:

df.replace(r'', np.NaN)

Does not work either - try it out.

| improve this answer | |
33

How about:

d = d.applymap(lambda x: np.nan if isinstance(x, basestring) and x.isspace() else x)

The applymap function applies a function to every cell of the dataframe.

| improve this answer | |
  • What a nice improvement! I should have thought of this in retrospect, but got hung up on doing boolean replacements for some reason. One question - is there an advantage to doing the basestring check vs. just str(x).isspace()? – Chris Clark Nov 18 '12 at 23:50
  • 1
    @ChrisClark: Either one is fine, although I would guess that the isinstance will be a bit faster. – BrenBarn Nov 18 '12 at 23:55
  • 13
    The reference to "basestring" in the code above will not work in Python 3.... in that case, try using "str" instead. – Spike Williams Feb 9 '15 at 20:39
  • 4
    Note that this solution doesn't replace empty strings ''. To consider also empty strings, use: d = d.applymap(lambda x: np.nan if isinstance(x, basestring) and (not x or x.isspace()) else x) – tuomastik May 31 '17 at 12:34
18

I will did this:

df = df.apply(lambda x: x.str.strip()).replace('', np.nan)

or

df = df.apply(lambda x: x.str.strip() if isinstance(x, str) else x).replace('', np.nan)

You can strip all str, then replace empty str with np.nan.

| improve this answer | |
  • lambda x: x.str.strip() should be lambda x: x.strip()? minor suggestion: add .astype(str) in front, this solves other data issues for me. This works for me: df=df.apply['column'].astype(str).apply(lambda x: x.strip()).replace('', np.nan) – Wouter Sep 16 '17 at 21:09
  • The second line of code handles both int/float and string type columns. Nice. Tks! – Kate Stohr Mar 9 '19 at 17:34
6

Simplest of all solutions:

df = df.replace(r'^\s+$', np.nan, regex=True)
| improve this answer | |
5

If you are exporting the data from the CSV file it can be as simple as this :

df = pd.read_csv(file_csv, na_values=' ')

This will create the data frame as well as replace blank values as Na

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Another option..using skipinitialspace=True also removes any whitespace after the delimiter which would cause any length of white space, empty strings to be read as nan. However if you want to retain the initial spaces for what ever reason then this option is not a good choice. – Rajshekar Reddy Oct 31 '18 at 3:31
  • 1
    @RajshekarReddy can you please put this as an answer somewhere, this was brilliant! – User2321 Sep 30 '19 at 8:05
2

For a very fast and simple solution where you check equality against a single value, you can use the mask method.

df.mask(df == ' ')
| improve this answer | |
1

These are all close to the right answer, but I wouldn't say any solve the problem while remaining most readable to others reading your code. I'd say that answer is a combination of BrenBarn's Answer and tuomasttik's comment below that answer. BrenBarn's answer utilizes isspace builtin, but does not support removing empty strings, as OP requested, and I would tend to attribute that as the standard use case of replacing strings with null.

I rewrote it with .apply, so you can call it on a pd.Series or pd.DataFrame.


Python 3:

To replace empty strings or strings of entirely spaces:

df = df.apply(lambda x: np.nan if isinstance(x, str) and (x.isspace() or not x) else x)

To replace strings of entirely spaces:

df = df.apply(lambda x: np.nan if isinstance(x, str) and x.isspace() else x)

To use this in Python 2, you'll need to replace str with basestring.

Python 2:

To replace empty strings or strings of entirely spaces:

df = df.apply(lambda x: np.nan if isinstance(x, basestring) and (x.isspace() or not x) else x)

To replace strings of entirely spaces:

df = df.apply(lambda x: np.nan if isinstance(x, basestring) and x.isspace() else x)
| improve this answer | |
1

This worked for me. When I import my csv file I added na_values = ' '. Spaces are not included in the default NaN values.

df= pd.read_csv(filepath,na_values = ' ')
| improve this answer | |
0
print(df.isnull().sum()) # check numbers of null value in each column

modifiedDf=df.fillna("NaN") # Replace empty/null values with "NaN"

# modifiedDf = fd.dropna() # Remove rows with empty values

print(modifiedDf.isnull().sum()) # check numbers of null value in each column
| improve this answer | |
0

This is not an elegant solution, but what does seem to work is saving to XLSX and then importing it back. The other solutions on this page did not work for me, unsure why.

data.to_excel(filepath, index=False)
data = pd.read_excel(filepath)
| improve this answer | |
0

This should work

df.loc[df.Variable == '', 'Variable'] = 'Value'

or

df.loc[df.Variable1 == '', 'Variable2'] = 'Value'
| improve this answer | |
-1

you can also use a filter to do it.

df = PD.DataFrame([
    [-0.532681, 'foo', 0],
    [1.490752, 'bar', 1],
    [-1.387326, 'foo', 2],
    [0.814772, 'baz', ' '],     
    [-0.222552, '   ', 4],
    [-1.176781,  'qux', '  '])
    df[df=='']='nan'
    df=df.astype(float)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Every line of this code (not including data) is faulty. – Julius Jan 14 at 17:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.