115

I'm trying to make a game with dice, and I need to have random numbers in it (to simulate the sides of the die. I know how to make it between 1 and 6). Using

#include <cstdlib> 
#include <ctime> 
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() 
{ 
    srand((unsigned)time(0)); 
    int i;
    i = (rand()%6)+1; 
    cout << i << "\n"; 
}

doesn't work very well, because when I run the program a few times, here's the output I get:

6
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
5
2

So I want a command that will generate a different random number each time, not the same one 5 times in a row. Is there a command that will do this?

  • 37
    Distribution issues aside, keep in mind that with random numbers comes the possibility of getting the same result several times in a row. If you were guaranteed not to get the same number twice in a row, the results wouldn't really be random, would they? – cdhowie Nov 18 '12 at 23:25
  • 5
    What makes you think those numbers aren't random? Throw a die for real and you very well could get that outcome. If they were guaranteed to be different between each throw then it wouldn't really be random would it. – mattjgalloway Nov 18 '12 at 23:27
  • 2
    Also read eternallyconfuzzled.com/arts/jsw_art_rand.aspx why using the modulus operator isn't often a good idea. – Benjamin Bannier Nov 18 '12 at 23:29
  • 4
    You're misunderstanding a lot more than one can fit in a comment or even an answer. You need to learn, independently, about pseudo-random number generators, about seeds, about the importance of picking a truly random seed, and about uniform distributions. – Kerrek SB Nov 18 '12 at 23:33
  • 14
    When you seed with time. This also means that if you run your program more than once a second you will get the same number. – Martin York Nov 18 '12 at 23:37

10 Answers 10

58

The most fundamental problem of your test application is that you call srand once and then call rand one time and exit.

The whole point of srand function is to initialize the sequence of pseudo-random numbers with a random seed. It means that if you pass the same value to srand in two different applications (with the same srand/rand implementation) you will get exactly the same sequence of rand() values read after that. But your pseudo-random sequence consists of one element only - your output consists of the first elements of different pseudo-random sequences seeded with time of 1 second precision. So what do you expect to see? When you happen to run application on the same second your result is the same of course (as Martin York already mentioned in a comment to the answer).

Actually you should call srand(seed) one time and then call rand() many times and analyze that sequence - it should look random.

  • I have asked similar question in here link but still couldnt find any clear answer yet. Can you please demonstrate "Actually you should call srand(seed) one time and then call rand()" with codes because I already did what you say but it is not working properly. – bashburak Mar 28 at 7:41
  • 2
    @bashburak It seems that you totally missed the point of this answer. Why exactly did you cut my quote? I said in my answer literally "Actually you should call srand(seed) one time and then call rand() many times and analyze that sequence - it should look random." Did you notice that you should call rand() MANY TIMES after single srand(...) call? Your question in your link is exact duplicate of this question with exact same misunderstanding. – Serge Dundich May 4 at 16:36
166

Using modulo may introduce bias into the random numbers, depending on the random number generator. See this question for more info. Of course, it's perfectly possible to get repeating numbers in a random sequence.

Try some C++11 features for better distribution:

#include <random>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::random_device dev;
    std::mt19937 rng(dev());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<std::mt19937::result_type> dist6(1,6); // distribution in range [1, 6]

    std::cout << dist6(rng) << std::endl;
}

See this question/answer for more info on C++11 random numbers. The above isn't the only way to do this, but is one way.

  • 4
    The amount of bias introduced by using %6 is vanishingly small. Maybe significant if you're writing a craps game to be used in Las Vegas, but of no consequence in almost any other context. – Hot Licks May 8 '14 at 20:53
  • 6
    HotLicks: agreed, but if you're using a version of C++ that supports random_device and mt19937 already, there is literally no reason not to go all out and use the standard uniform_int_distribution too. – Quuxplusone Aug 28 '17 at 21:25
  • 3
    All programmers should advise people to avoid modulo like the plague because it uses division and that costs hundreds of clock cycles and can mess up your application timing and/or burn a lot of battery power. – user2356685 Sep 5 '18 at 17:28
  • 1
    Is rng for "range"? – Christoffer Oct 2 '18 at 17:33
  • 3
    @ChristofferHjärtström: It's for random number generator. – Cornstalks Oct 3 '18 at 5:21
10

If you are using boost libs you can obtain a random generator in this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

// Used in randomization
#include <ctime>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>
#include <boost/random/variate_generator.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

int current_time_nanoseconds(){
    struct timespec tm;
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &tm);
    return tm.tv_nsec;
}

int main (int argc, char* argv[]) {
    unsigned int dice_rolls = 12;
    random::mt19937 rng(current_time_nanoseconds());
    random::uniform_int_distribution<> six(1,6);

    for(unsigned int i=0; i<dice_rolls; i++){
        cout << six(rng) << endl;
    }
}

Where the function current_time_nanoseconds() gives the current time in nanoseconds which is used as a seed.


Here is a more general class to get random integers and dates in a range:

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>
#include <boost/random/variate_generator.hpp>
#include "boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp"
#include "boost/date_time/gregorian/gregorian.hpp"


using namespace std;
using namespace boost;
using namespace boost::posix_time;
using namespace boost::gregorian;


class Randomizer {
private:
    static const bool debug_mode = false;
    random::mt19937 rng_;

    // The private constructor so that the user can not directly instantiate
    Randomizer() {
        if(debug_mode==true){
            this->rng_ = random::mt19937();
        }else{
            this->rng_ = random::mt19937(current_time_nanoseconds());
        }
    };

    int current_time_nanoseconds(){
        struct timespec tm;
        clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &tm);
        return tm.tv_nsec;
    }

    // C++ 03
    // ========
    // Dont forget to declare these two. You want to make sure they
    // are unacceptable otherwise you may accidentally get copies of
    // your singleton appearing.
    Randomizer(Randomizer const&);     // Don't Implement
    void operator=(Randomizer const&); // Don't implement

public:
    static Randomizer& get_instance(){
        // The only instance of the class is created at the first call get_instance ()
        // and will be destroyed only when the program exits
        static Randomizer instance;
        return instance;
    }
    bool method() { return true; };

    int rand(unsigned int floor, unsigned int ceil){
        random::uniform_int_distribution<> rand_ = random::uniform_int_distribution<> (floor,ceil);
        return (rand_(rng_));
    }

    // Is not considering the millisecons
    time_duration rand_time_duration(){
        boost::posix_time::time_duration floor(0, 0, 0, 0);
        boost::posix_time::time_duration ceil(23, 59, 59, 0);
        unsigned int rand_seconds = rand(floor.total_seconds(), ceil.total_seconds());
        return seconds(rand_seconds);
    }


    date rand_date_from_epoch_to_now(){
        date now = second_clock::local_time().date();
        return rand_date_from_epoch_to_ceil(now);
    }

    date rand_date_from_epoch_to_ceil(date ceil_date){
        date epoch = ptime(date(1970,1,1)).date();
        return rand_date_in_interval(epoch, ceil_date);
    }

    date rand_date_in_interval(date floor_date, date ceil_date){
        return rand_ptime_in_interval(ptime(floor_date), ptime(ceil_date)).date();
    }

    ptime rand_ptime_from_epoch_to_now(){
        ptime now = second_clock::local_time();
        return rand_ptime_from_epoch_to_ceil(now);
    }

    ptime rand_ptime_from_epoch_to_ceil(ptime ceil_date){
        ptime epoch = ptime(date(1970,1,1));
        return rand_ptime_in_interval(epoch, ceil_date);
    }

    ptime rand_ptime_in_interval(ptime floor_date, ptime ceil_date){
        time_duration const diff = ceil_date - floor_date;
        long long gap_seconds = diff.total_seconds();
        long long step_seconds = Randomizer::get_instance().rand(0, gap_seconds);
        return floor_date + seconds(step_seconds);
    }
};
7
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

int main() {
    srand(time(NULL));
    int random_number = std::rand(); // rand() return a number between ​0​ and RAND_MAX
    std::cout << random_number;
    return 0;
}

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/random/rand

3

Can get full Randomer class code for generating random numbers from here!

If you need random numbers in different parts of the project you can create a separate class Randomer to incapsulate all the random stuff inside it.

Something like that:

class Randomer {
    // random seed by default
    std::mt19937 gen_;
    std::uniform_int_distribution<size_t> dist_;

public:
    /*  ... some convenient ctors ... */ 

    Randomer(size_t min, size_t max, unsigned int seed = std::random_device{}())
        : gen_{seed}, dist_{min, max} {
    }

    // if you want predictable numbers
    void SetSeed(unsigned int seed) {
        gen_.seed(seed);
    }

    size_t operator()() {
        return dist_(gen_);
    }
};

Such a class would be handy later on:

int main() {
    Randomer randomer{0, 10};
    std::cout << randomer() << "\n";
}

You can check this link as an example how i use such Randomer class to generate random strings. You can also use Randomer if you wish.

1

Here is a solution. Create a function that returns the random number and place it outside the main function to make it global. Hope this helps

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
int rollDie();
using std::cout;
int main (){
    srand((unsigned)time(0));
    int die1;
    int die2;
    for (int n=10; n>0; n--){
    die1 = rollDie();
    die2 = rollDie();
    cout << die1 << " + " << die2 << " = " << die1 + die2 << "\n";
}
system("pause");
return 0;
}
int rollDie(){
    return (rand()%6)+1;
}
1

for random every RUN file

size_t randomGenerator(size_t min, size_t max) {
    std::mt19937 rng;
    rng.seed(std::random_device()());
    //rng.seed(std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now().time_since_epoch().count());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<std::mt19937::result_type> dist(min, max);

    return dist(rng);
}
1

Generate a different random number each time, not the same one six times in a row.

Use case scenario

I likened Predictability's problem to a bag of six bits of paper, each with a value from 0 to 5 written on it. A piece of paper is drawn from the bag each time a new value is required. If the bag is empty, then the numbers are put back into the bag.

...from this, I can create an algorithm of sorts.

Algorithm

A bag is usually a Collection. I chose a bool[] (otherwise known as a boolean array, bit plane or bit map) to take the role of the bag.

The reason I chose a bool[] is because the index of each item is already the value of each piece of paper. If the papers required anything else written on them then I would have used a Dictionary<string, bool> in its place. The boolean value is used to keep track of whether the number has been drawn yet or not.

A counter called RemainingNumberCount is initialised to 5 that counts down as a random number is chosen. This saves us from having to count how many pieces of paper are left each time we wish to draw a new number.

To select the next random value I'm using a for..loop to scan through the bag of indexes, and a counter to count off when an index is false called NumberOfMoves.

NumberOfMoves is used to choose the next available number. NumberOfMoves is first set to be a random value between 0 and 5, because there are 0..5 available steps we can make through the bag. On the next iteration NumberOfMoves is set to be a random value between 0 and 4, because there are now 0..4 steps we can make through the bag. As the numbers are used, the available numbers reduce so we instead use rand() % (RemainingNumberCount + 1) to calculate the next value for NumberOfMoves.

When the NumberOfMoves counter reaches zero, the for..loop should as follows:

  1. Set the current Value to be the same as for..loop's index.
  2. Set all the numbers in the bag to false.
  3. Break from the for..loop.

Code

The code for the above solution is as follows:

(put the following three blocks into the main .cpp file one after the other)

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <ctime> 
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class RandomBag {
public:
    int Value = -1;

    RandomBag() {
        ResetBag();

    }

    void NextValue() {
        int BagOfNumbersLength = sizeof(BagOfNumbers) / sizeof(*BagOfNumbers);

        int NumberOfMoves = rand() % (RemainingNumberCount + 1);

        for (int i = 0; i < BagOfNumbersLength; i++)            
            if (BagOfNumbers[i] == 0) {
                NumberOfMoves--;

                if (NumberOfMoves == -1)
                {
                    Value = i;

                    BagOfNumbers[i] = 1;

                    break;

                }

            }



        if (RemainingNumberCount == 0) {
            RemainingNumberCount = 5;

            ResetBag();

        }
        else            
            RemainingNumberCount--; 

    }

    std::string ToString() {
        return std::to_string(Value);

    }

private:
    bool BagOfNumbers[6]; 

    int RemainingNumberCount;

    int NumberOfMoves;

    void ResetBag() {
        RemainingNumberCount = 5;

        NumberOfMoves = rand() % 6;

        int BagOfNumbersLength = sizeof(BagOfNumbers) / sizeof(*BagOfNumbers);

        for (int i = 0; i < BagOfNumbersLength; i++)            
            BagOfNumbers[i] = 0;

    }

};

A Console class

I create this Console class because it makes it easy to redirect output.

Below in the code...

Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

...can be replaced by...

std::cout << "The next value is " + randomBag.ToString() << std::endl; 

...and then this Console class can be deleted if desired.

class Console {
public:
    static void WriteLine(std::string s) {
        std::cout << s << std::endl;

    }

};

Main method

Example usage as follows:

int main() {
    srand((unsigned)time(0)); // Initialise random seed based on current time

    RandomBag randomBag;

    Console::WriteLine("First set of six...\n");

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    Console::WriteLine("\nSecond set of six...\n");

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    Console::WriteLine("\nThird set of six...\n");

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    randomBag.NextValue();

    Console::WriteLine("The next value is " + randomBag.ToString());

    Console::WriteLine("\nProcess complete.\n");

    system("pause");

}

Example output

When I ran the program, I got the following output:

First set of six...

The next value is 2
The next value is 3
The next value is 4
The next value is 5
The next value is 0
The next value is 1

Second set of six...

The next value is 3
The next value is 4
The next value is 2
The next value is 0
The next value is 1
The next value is 5

Third set of six...

The next value is 4
The next value is 5
The next value is 2
The next value is 0
The next value is 3
The next value is 1

Process complete.

Press any key to continue . . .

Closing statement

This program was written using Visual Studio 2017, and I chose to make it a Visual C++ Windows Console Application project using .Net 4.6.1.

I'm not doing anything particularly special here, so the code should work on earlier versions of Visual Studio too.

  • If this is VS 2017, you should be using the most recent version of the standard library: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/random . Currently this example uses the C random library functions and "There are no guarantees as to the quality of the random sequence produced". – Robert Andrzejuk Jan 13 at 19:22
0

This code produces random numbers from n to m.

int random(int from, int to){
    return rand() % (to - from + 1) + from;
}

example:

int main(){
    srand(time(0));
    cout << random(0, 99) << "\n";
}
  • 1
    This doesn't really answer the question. – HolyBlackCat Jul 7 '18 at 10:28
  • @HolyBlackCat First I read the title only, after your attention I fixed it. thanks. – Amir Forsati Jul 7 '18 at 11:47
  • You didn't fix it. The point of the question is that if you run the program multiple times per second, then it generates the same random values. Your code does that too. – HolyBlackCat Jul 7 '18 at 11:48
  • 1
    @HolyBlackCat I've checked it for multiple runs, it's working. Have you added srand(time(0)) to the main function before random(n, m)? – Amir Forsati Jul 7 '18 at 11:54
  • 1
    You should add srand(time(0)) to main function not to for loop or inside the function implementation. – Amir Forsati Jul 7 '18 at 11:56
-1

Here is a simple random generator with approx. equal probability of generating positive and negative values around 0:

  int getNextRandom(const size_t lim) 
  {
        int nextRand = rand() % lim;
        int nextSign = rand() % lim;
        if (nextSign < lim / 2)
            return -nextRand;
        return nextRand;
  }


   int main()
   {
        srand(time(NULL));
        int r = getNextRandom(100);
        cout << r << endl;
        return 0;
   }

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