80

I have been trying to find the intersection between two std::set in C++, but I keep getting an error.

I created a small sample test for this

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <set>
using namespace std;

int main() {
  set<int> s1;
  set<int> s2;

  s1.insert(1);
  s1.insert(2);
  s1.insert(3);
  s1.insert(4);

  s2.insert(1);
  s2.insert(6);
  s2.insert(3);
  s2.insert(0);

  set_intersection(s1.begin(),s1.end(),s2.begin(),s2.end());
  return 0;
}

The latter program does not generate any output, but I expect to have a new set (let's call it s3) with the following values:

s3 = [ 1 , 3 ]

Instead I'm getting the error:

test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:19: error: no matching function for call to ‘set_intersection(std::_Rb_tree_const_iterator<int>, std::_Rb_tree_const_iterator<int>, std::_Rb_tree_const_iterator<int>, std::_Rb_tree_const_iterator<int>)’

What I understand out of this error, is that there's no definition in set_intersection that accepts Rb_tree_const_iterator<int> as parameter.

Furthermore, I suppose the std::set.begin() method returns an object of such type,

is there a better way to find the intersection of two std::set in C++? Preferably a built-in function?

Thanks a lot!

  • set_intersection is basically the "merge" step in mergesort. you 'd need to output each set to a sorted vector first before calling set_intersection – Mave May 24 '15 at 5:52
  • "I expect to have a new set (let's call it s3)" But you don't, and you didn't. I don't understand where you expected the results to go. Also you didn't read the documentation to find out what arguments to pass. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 May 24 '19 at 11:28
94

You havent provided an output iterator for set_intersection

template <class InputIterator1, class InputIterator2, class OutputIterator>
OutputIterator set_intersection ( InputIterator1 first1, InputIterator1 last1,
                                InputIterator2 first2, InputIterator2 last2,
                                OutputIterator result );

Fix this by doing something like

...;
set<int> intersect;
set_intersection(s1.begin(),s1.end(),s2.begin(),s2.end(),
                  std::inserter(intersect,intersect.begin()));

You need a std::insert iterator since the set is as of now empty. We cannot use back_ or front_inserter since set doesnt support those operations.

  • 53
    I would like to understand why such a fundamental operation on sets requires such an arcanely verbose incantation. Why not a simple set<T>& set::isect(set<T>&) method, that does the needful? (I'd ask for an set<T>& set::operator^(set<T>&), but that's likely a bridge too far.) – Ryan V. Bissell Aug 28 '14 at 3:22
  • 3
    @RyanV.Bissell this is a similar design to almost all algorithms in <algorithm> so consistency if nothing else. This style also, I assume, gives you flexibility. And allows the algos to be used with several containers, though that might not happen here.. Also your signature might not work, you probably need to return a value. And that in the days before copy semantics would have been a double copy i think. I havent done c++ for a while now so take this with a pinch or 3 of salt – Karthik T Aug 28 '14 at 5:25
  • 4
    I still consider myself an STL novice, so application of salt grains also applies. My comment editing window has expired, so I cannot correct the return-by-reference faux-pas. My comment was not a complaint about consistency, but an honest question about why this syntax must necessarily taste so bitter. Perhaps I should make this an SO Question. – Ryan V. Bissell Aug 28 '14 at 11:55
  • 3
    Actually, most of the C++ std lib is designed in this obscure fashion. While the elegance of the design is obvious (w.r.t genericity, but not only), the complexity of the API has devastating effects (mostly because people keep on reinventing wheels since they can't use those that ship with their compiler). In another world, the designers would have been slapped for having favored their pleasure over their user's. In this world ... well, at least we have StackOverflow. – user948581 Mar 30 '16 at 12:12
  • 3
    This is a "general syntax" - you can also do set_intersection on a vector and on a list and store results into a deque, and you should be able to do even this thing efficiently (of course, it's your problem to take care that both source containers are sorted prior to calling this). I don't find it bad, the only thing I have problem with is that there could be also a method of set container that does intersection with another set. The topic of passing a container instead of .begin() - .end() is another thing - this will be fixed once C++ has concepts. – Ethouris Oct 10 '16 at 6:45
22

Have a look at the sample in the link: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/set_intersection

You need another container to store the intersection data, below code suppose to work:

std::vector<int> common_data;
set_intersection(s1.begin(),s1.end(),s2.begin(),s2.end(), std::back_inserter(common_data));
  • 3
    back_inserter does not work with set as set has no push_back function. – Jack Aidley Oct 13 '17 at 11:50
6

See std::set_intersection. You must add an output iterator, where you will store the result:

#include <iterator>
std::vector<int> s3;
set_intersection(s1.begin(),s1.end(),s2.begin(),s2.end(), std::back_inserter(s3));

See Ideone for full listing.

  • 3
    Note that back_inserter won't work if you want the result to also be a set, then you need std::inserter like Karthik used. – Joseph Garvin Dec 9 '15 at 15:13
4

Just comment here. I think it is time to add union, intersect operation to the set interface. Let's propose this in the future standards. I have been using the std for a long time, each time I used the set operation I wished the std were better. For some complicated set operation, like intersect, you may simply (easier?) modify the following code:

template <class InputIterator1, class InputIterator2, class OutputIterator>
  OutputIterator set_intersection (InputIterator1 first1, InputIterator1 last1,
                                   InputIterator2 first2, InputIterator2 last2,
                                   OutputIterator result)
{
  while (first1!=last1 && first2!=last2)
  {
    if (*first1<*first2) ++first1;
    else if (*first2<*first1) ++first2;
    else {
      *result = *first1;
      ++result; ++first1; ++first2;
    }
  }
  return result;
}

copied from http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/set_intersection/

For example, if your output is a set, you can output.insert(*first1). Furthermore, you function may not be templated.If you code can be shorter than using the std set_intersection function then go ahead with it.

If you want to do a union of two set you can simply setA.insert(setB.begin(), setB.end()); This is much simpler than the set_union method. However, this will not work with vector.

2

The first (well-voted) comment of the accepted answer complains about a missing operator for the existing std set operations.

On one hand, I understand the lack of such operators in the standard library. On the other hand, it is easy to add them (for the personal joy) if desired. I overloaded

  • operator *() for intersection of sets
  • operator +() for union of sets.

Sample test-set-ops.cc:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <set>

template <class T, class CMP = std::less<T>, class ALLOC = std::allocator<T> >
std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> operator * (
  const std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s1, const std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s2)
{
  std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> s;
  std::set_intersection(s1.begin(), s1.end(), s2.begin(), s2.end(),
    std::inserter(s, s.begin()));
  return s;
}

template <class T, class CMP = std::less<T>, class ALLOC = std::allocator<T> >
std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> operator + (
  const std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s1, const std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s2)
{
  std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> s;
  std::set_union(s1.begin(), s1.end(), s2.begin(), s2.end(),
    std::inserter(s, s.begin()));
  return s;
}

// sample code to check them out:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <class T>
ostream& operator << (ostream &out, const set<T> &values)
{
  const char *sep = " ";
  for (const T &value : values) {
    out << sep << value; sep = ", ";
  }
  return out;
}

int main()
{
  set<int> s1 { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
  cout << "s1: {" << s1 << " }" << endl;
  set<int> s2 { 0, 1, 3, 6 };
  cout << "s2: {" << s2 << " }" << endl;
  cout << "I: {" << s1 * s2 << " }" << endl;
  cout << "U: {" << s1 + s2 << " }" << endl;
  return 0;
}

Compiled and tested:

$ g++ -std=c++11 -o test-set-ops test-set-ops.cc 

$ ./test-set-ops     
s1: { 1, 2, 3, 4 }
s2: { 0, 1, 3, 6 }
I: { 1, 3 }
U: { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 }

$ 

What I don't like is the copy of return values in the operators. May be, this could be solved using move assignment but this is still beyond my skills.

Due to my limited knowledge about these "new fancy" move semantics, I was concerned about the operator returns which might cause copies of the returned sets. Olaf Dietsche pointed out that these concerns are unnecessary as std::set is already equipped with move constructor/assignment.

Although I believed him, I was thinking how to check this out (for something like "self-convincing"). Actually, it is quite easy. As templates has to be provided in source code, you can simply step through with the debugger. Thus, I placed a break point right at the return s; of the operator *() and proceeded with single-step which leaded me immediately into std::set::set(_myt&& _Right): et voilà – the move constructor. Thanks, Olaf, for the (my) enlightment.

For the sake of completeness, I implemented the corresponding assignment operators as well

  • operator *=() for "destructive" intersection of sets
  • operator +=() for "destructive" union of sets.

Sample test-set-assign-ops.cc:

#include <iterator>
#include <set>

template <class T, class CMP = std::less<T>, class ALLOC = std::allocator<T> >
std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC>& operator *= (
  std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s1, const std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s2)
{
  auto iter1 = s1.begin();
  for (auto iter2 = s2.begin(); iter1 != s1.end() && iter2 != s2.end();) {
    if (*iter1 < *iter2) iter1 = s1.erase(iter1);
    else {
      if (!(*iter2 < *iter1)) ++iter1;
      ++iter2;
    }
  }
  while (iter1 != s1.end()) iter1 = s1.erase(iter1);
  return s1;
}

template <class T, class CMP = std::less<T>, class ALLOC = std::allocator<T> >
std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC>& operator += (
  std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s1, const std::set<T, CMP, ALLOC> &s2)
{
  s1.insert(s2.begin(), s2.end());
  return s1;
}

// sample code to check them out:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <class T>
ostream& operator << (ostream &out, const set<T> &values)
{
  const char *sep = " ";
  for (const T &value : values) {
    out << sep << value; sep = ", ";
  }
  return out;
}

int main()
{
  set<int> s1 { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
  cout << "s1: {" << s1 << " }" << endl;
  set<int> s2 { 0, 1, 3, 6 };
  cout << "s2: {" << s2 << " }" << endl;
  set<int> s1I = s1;
  s1I *= s2;
  cout << "s1I: {" << s1I << " }" << endl;
  set<int> s2I = s2;
  s2I *= s1;
  cout << "s2I: {" << s2I << " }" << endl;
  set<int> s1U = s1;
  s1U += s2;
  cout << "s1U: {" << s1U << " }" << endl;
  set<int> s2U = s2;
  s2U += s1;
  cout << "s2U: {" << s2U << " }" << endl;
  return 0;
}

Compiled and tested:

$ g++ -std=c++11 -o test-set-assign-ops test-set-assign-ops.cc 

$ ./test-set-assign-ops
s1: { 1, 2, 3, 4 }
s2: { 0, 1, 3, 6 }
s1I: { 1, 3 }
s2I: { 1, 3 }
s1U: { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 }
s2U: { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 }

$
  • 1
    std::set already implements the necessary move constructor and assignment operator, so no need to worry about that. Also the compiler most likely employs return value optimization – Olaf Dietsche Jul 13 '17 at 20:01
  • @OlafDietsche Thanks for your comment. I checked this out and improved the answer respectively. About RVO, I already had certain discussions with my colleagues until I showed them in the debugger of VS2013 that it doesn't happen (at least in our devel. platform). Actually, it is not that important except if code is performance critical. In the latter case, I keep for now not to rely on RVO. (That's actually not that difficult in C++...) – Scheff Jul 14 '17 at 6:12
  • @Scheff well Scheff(not Bose), nice explanation. – JeJo May 4 '18 at 15:33
  • Even now VS's support for C++17's guaranteed elision is woeful. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 May 24 '19 at 11:31

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