273

How do I tell the time difference in minutes between two datetime objects?

13 Answers 13

298
>>> import datetime
>>> a = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> b = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> c = b - a
datetime.timedelta(0, 8, 562000)
>>> divmod(c.days * 86400 + c.seconds, 60)
(0, 8)      # 0 minutes, 8 seconds
129

New at Python 2.7 is the timedelta instance method .total_seconds(). From the Python docs, this is equivalent to (td.microseconds + (td.seconds + td.days * 24 * 3600) * 10**6) / 10**6.

Reference: http://docs.python.org/2/library/datetime.html#datetime.timedelta.total_seconds

>>> import datetime
>>> time1 = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> time2 = datetime.datetime.now() # waited a few minutes before pressing enter
>>> elapsedTime = time2 - time1
>>> elapsedTime
datetime.timedelta(0, 125, 749430)
>>> divmod(elapsedTime.total_seconds(), 60)
(2.0, 5.749430000000004) # divmod returns quotient and remainder
# 2 minutes, 5.74943 seconds
36

Using datetime example

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> then = datetime(2012, 3, 5, 23, 8, 15)        # Random date in the past
>>> now  = datetime.now()                         # Now
>>> duration = now - then                         # For build-in functions
>>> duration_in_s = duration.total_seconds()      # Total number of seconds between dates

Duration in years

>>> years = divmod(duration_in_s, 31556926)[0]    # Seconds in a year=31556926.

Duration in days

>>> days  = duration.days                         # Build-in datetime function
>>> days  = divmod(duration_in_s, 86400)[0]       # Seconds in a day = 86400

Duration in hours

>>> hours = divmod(duration_in_s, 3600)[0]        # Seconds in an hour = 3600

Duration in minutes

>>> minutes = divmod(duration_in_s, 60)[0]        # Seconds in a minute = 60

Duration in seconds

>>> seconds = duration.seconds                    # Build-in datetime function
>>> seconds = duration_in_s

Duration in microseconds

>>> microseconds = duration.microseconds          # Build-in datetime function  

Total duration between the two dates

>>> days    = divmod(duration_in_s, 86400)        # Get days (without [0]!)
>>> hours   = divmod(days[1], 3600)               # Use remainder of days to calc hours
>>> minutes = divmod(hours[1], 60)                # Use remainder of hours to calc minutes
>>> seconds = divmod(minutes[1], 1)               # Use remainder of minutes to calc seconds
>>> print("Time between dates: %d days, %d hours, %d minutes and %d seconds" % (days[0], hours[0], minutes[0], seconds[0]))

or simply:

>>> print(now - then)
26

Just subtract one from the other. You get a timedelta object with the difference.

>>> import datetime
>>> d1 = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> d2 = datetime.datetime.now() # after a 5-second or so pause
>>> d2 - d1
datetime.timedelta(0, 5, 203000)

You can convert dd.days, dd.seconds and dd.microseconds to minutes.

19

If a, b are datetime objects then to find the time difference between them in Python 3:

from datetime import timedelta

time_difference = a - b
time_difference_in_minutes = time_difference / timedelta(minutes=1)

On earlier Python versions:

time_difference_in_minutes = time_difference.total_seconds() / 60

If a, b are naive datetime objects such as returned by datetime.now() then the result may be wrong if the objects represent local time with different UTC offsets e.g., around DST transitions or for past/future dates. More details: Find if 24 hrs have passed between datetimes - Python.

To get reliable results, use UTC time or timezone-aware datetime objects.

17

Use divmod:

now = int(time.time()) # epoch seconds
then = now - 90000 # some time in the past

d = divmod(now-then,86400)  # days
h = divmod(d[1],3600)  # hours
m = divmod(h[1],60)  # minutes
s = m[1]  # seconds

print '%d days, %d hours, %d minutes, %d seconds' % (d[0],h[0],m[0],s)
  • 1
    This should be put into datetime module. I just can't understand why it used only days, seconds and millis... – paulochf Dec 5 '14 at 17:59
  • This doesn't answer the question regarding datetime objects. – elec3647 Oct 5 '17 at 14:43
7

This is how I get the number of hours that elapsed between two datetime.datetime objects:

before = datetime.datetime.now()
after  = datetime.datetime.now()
hours  = math.floor(((after - before).seconds) / 3600)
  • 7
    This won't quite work: timedelta.seconds only gives the number of seconds explicitly stored - which the documentation guarantees will total less than one day. You want (after - before).total_seconds(), which gives the number of seconds that span the entire delta. – lvc May 26 '13 at 1:25
  • 1
    (after - before).total_seconds() // 3600 (Python 2.7) or (after - before) // timedelta(seconds=3600) (Python 3) – jfs May 26 '13 at 2:09
  • @lvc My old code was actually written that way, and I thought I was being smart and "fixing" it up. Thanks for the correction. – Tony May 26 '13 at 23:08
  • @J.F.Sebastian Thanks for that, I forgot about the // operator. And I do I like the py3 syntax better, but am using 2.7. – Tony May 26 '13 at 23:10
  • @Tony: // works on Python 2 and 3. – jfs Oct 27 '14 at 11:42
6

To just find the number of days: timedelta has a 'days' attribute. You can simply query that.

>>>from datetime import datetime, timedelta
>>>d1 = datetime(2015, 9, 12, 13, 9, 45)
>>>d2 = datetime(2015, 8, 29, 21, 10, 12)
>>>d3 = d1- d2
>>>print d3
13 days, 15:59:33
>>>print d3.days
13
4

Just thought it might be useful to mention formatting as well in regards to timedelta. strptime() parses a string representing a time according to a format.

from datetime import datetime

datetimeFormat = '%Y/%m/%d %H:%M:%S.%f'    
time1 = '2016/03/16 10:01:28.585'
time2 = '2016/03/16 09:56:28.067'  
time_dif = datetime.strptime(time1, datetimeFormat) - datetime.strptime(time2,datetimeFormat)
print(time_dif)

This will output: 0:05:00.518000

2

I use somethign like this :

from datetime import datetime

def check_time_difference(t1: datetime, t2: datetime):
    t1_date = datetime(
        t1.year,
        t1.month,
        t1.day,
        t1.hour,
        t1.minute,
        t1.second)

    t2_date = datetime(
        t2.year,
        t2.month,
        t2.day,
        t2.hour,
        t2.minute,
        t2.second)

    t_elapsed = t1_date - t2_date

    return t_elapsed

# usage 
f = "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S+01:00"
t1 = datetime.strptime("2018-03-07 22:56:57+01:00", f)
t2 = datetime.strptime("2018-03-07 22:48:05+01:00", f)
elapsed_time = check_time_difference(t1, t2)

print(elapsed_time)
#return : 0:08:52
  • 2
    you get perfectly good datetimes in, why do you copy them over? thats 75% of your code can be expressed by return t1-t2 – Patrick Artner Jun 20 '18 at 19:54
1

this is to find the difference between current time and 9.30 am

t=datetime.now()-datetime.now().replace(hour=9,minute=30)
0

This is my approach using mktime.

from datetime import datetime, timedelta
from time import mktime

yesterday = datetime.now() - timedelta(days=1)
today = datetime.now()

difference_in_seconds = abs(mktime(yesterday.timetuple()) - mktime(today.timetuple()))
difference_in_minutes = difference_in_seconds / 60
  • mktime() expects local time as an input. Local time maybe ambiguous and mktime() may return a wrong answer in this case. Use a - b instead (a,b - datetime objects). mktime() is unnecessary and it is sometimes wrong. Don't use it in this case. – jfs Oct 27 '14 at 11:45
  • maybe this is py3? py27 this didn't work for me. – AnneTheAgile Oct 2 '16 at 20:08
  • @AnneTheAgile, fixed, my fault on the import. Tested on Python 2.7.12 – Eduardo Oct 3 '16 at 8:53
0

In Other ways to get difference between date;

import dateutil.parser
import datetime
last_sent_date = "" # date string
timeDifference = current_date - dateutil.parser.parse(last_sent_date)
time_difference_in_minutes = (int(timeDifference.days) * 24 * 60) + int((timeDifference.seconds) / 60)

So get output in Min.

Thanks

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