235

Suppose we're building an address book application (contrived example) with AngularJS.

We have a form for contacts that has inputs for email and phone number, and we want to require one or the other, but not both: We only want the email input to be required if the phone input is empty or invalid, and vice versa.

Angular has a required directive, but it's not clear from the documentation how to use it in this case. So how can we conditionally require a form field? Write a custom directive?

467

There's no need to write a custom directive. Angular's documentation is good but not complete. In fact, there is a directive called ngRequired, that takes an Angular expression.

<input type='email'
       name='email'
       ng-model='contact.email' 
       placeholder='your@email.com'
       ng-required='!contact.phone' />

<input type='text'
       ng-model='contact.phone'             
       placeholder='(xxx) xxx-xxxx'
       ng-required='!contact.email' />  

Here's a more complete example: http://jsfiddle.net/uptnx/1/

3
  • 5
    It shouldn't be a problem, right? Just update the conditionals accordingly. If you explain what you need a bit more I (or other person here) will be able to show you :)
    – Puce
    Feb 2 '15 at 9:31
  • 1
    As a side note, you can also use a function and do more complex logic there. Nov 22 '15 at 12:47
  • 1
    This feature is documented by now: docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/directive/ngRequired
    – bjunix
    May 9 '16 at 11:42
26

if you want put a input required if other is written:

   <input type='text'
   name='name'
   ng-model='person.name'/>

   <input type='text'
   ng-model='person.lastname'             
   ng-required='person.name' />  

Regards.

15

For Angular2

<input type='email' 
    [(ngModel)]='contact.email'
    [required]='!contact.phone' >
4
  • EDIT: This is throwing a console error "ExpressionChangedAfterItHasBeenCheckedError: Expression has changed after it was checked." when I check the radio button I'm applying this on, but it does appear to do the conditional validation.
    – Eric Soyke
    Feb 15 '18 at 21:01
  • 4
    Angular2+ isn't tagged on this question. Since it's essentially a different framework, this answer isn't relevant.
    – isherwood
    Mar 1 '18 at 15:39
  • 1
    @isherwood you are right. I added it because I ended here while googling for that. I will delete it if it gets downvoted or controversial.
    – laffuste
    Aug 9 '18 at 9:39
  • @Iaffuste you could post and reply on a new question for Angular2+ to make it easy for people looking into this. +1 anyway =)
    – arjel
    Sep 28 '18 at 8:45
14

Simple you can use angular validation like :

 <input type='text'
   name='name'
   ng-model='person.name'
   ng-required='!person.lastname'/>

   <input type='text'
   name='lastname'
   ng-model='person.lastname'             
   ng-required='!person.name' /> 

You can now fill the value in only one text field. Either you can fill name or lastname. In this way you can use conditional required fill in AngularJs.

2
  • One can still fill in both the fields, can't they?
    – myTerminal
    Sep 15 '17 at 14:45
  • yes user can fill both the field, also in this condition if user fill one field, the other field is not mandatory Sep 18 '17 at 5:44
0

In AngularJS (version 1.x), there is a build-in directive ngRequired

<input type='email'
       name='email'
       ng-model='user.email' 
       placeholder='your@email.com'
       ng-required='!user.phone' />

<input type='text'
       ng-model='user.phone'             
       placeholder='(xxx) xxx-xxxx'
       ng-required='!user.email' /> 

In Angular2 or above

<input type='email'
       name='email'
       [(ngModel)]='user.email' 
       placeholder='your@email.com'
       [required]='!user.phone' />

<input type='text'
       [(ngModel)]='user.phone'             
       placeholder='(xxx) xxx-xxxx'
       [required]='!user.email' /> 
0

For Angular 2

<input [(ngModel)]='email' [required]='!phone' />
<input [(ngModel)]='phone' [required]='!email' /> 

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