10

I am trying to understand exactly how element visibility works on arrays in java.

Given the class:

class IntList {

    private final int[] array;

    public IntList(int[] array) {
        this.array = array;
    }

    public int[] readElements() {
        return Arrays.copyof(this.array, this.array.length);
    }

}    

and the following method body for creating an instance:

int[] array = new int[length];
fillArrayWithRandomData(array); // puts data into the array from arbitrary source
return new IntList(array);

I am wondering if the elements in the IntList are guaranteed to be visible by other threads that obtain a reference to the returned IntList?

I am sure that the REFERENCE to the array will be visible because it is final but I cannot seem to find a guarantee that the elements in the array will be visible as well.

Note: The IntList class has no methods that allow the modification of the array and the array reference is not published to any other object, I am only wondering about visibility after construction.

Edit: Sorry, my class is not called String in my actual implementation. I changed the class name to IntList because there seems to be too much confusion.

Edit: The final answer I'll put here is Yes, the elements are visible.
@MikeClark found the JLS answer: JLS § 17.5 "The usage model for final fields is a simple one: Set the final fields for an object in that object's constructor; and do not write a reference to the object being constructed in a place where another thread can see it before the object's constructor is finished. If this is followed, then when the object is seen by another thread, that thread will always see the correctly constructed version of that object's final fields. It will also see versions of any object or array referenced by those final fields that are at least as up-to-date as the final fields are."

Thanks again!

  • 7
    please don't call your classes as built-in classes. String clashes with java.lang.String - and may cause you no end of problems. – tucuxi Nov 20 '12 at 19:48
  • 3
    @SamuelRossille "visibility" is a term often used when discussing the [Java] memory model, which is a topic highly relevant to multithreading. See, for example, this discussion of the Java Memory Model leading up to the revised Java 5 JMM: ibm.com/developerworks/library/j-jtp03304. "One of the key concepts needed to understand the JMM is that of visibility -- how do you know that if thread A executes someVariable = 3, other threads will see the value 3 written there by thread A?" – Mike Clark Nov 20 '12 at 19:54
  • 1
    @TedHopp - the term "visibility" is also used heavily when referring to changes made across threads. see here: docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se5.0/html/memory.html – jtahlborn Nov 20 '12 at 20:06
  • 1
    @MikeClark - you should make your comment an answer since none of the current answers gets it quite right. – jtahlborn Nov 20 '12 at 20:06
  • 1
    @MikeClark and Brian I didn't know that meaning of visibility. Ignorance caused my mistake. Tx for the information. – Samuel Rossille Nov 20 '12 at 20:06
2

Since you are populating the array in the constructor then yes, any call to new String(int[] array) will have the array initialized by the time it returns. The final keyword will also guarantee that the most recent changes to the array parameter at the time of assignment will be visible.

  • there is no such constructor String(int[]) – Evgeniy Dorofeev Nov 20 '12 at 19:52
  • 1
    @EvgeniyDorofeev - There is in OP's class. (It's not java.lang.String.) – Ted Hopp Nov 20 '12 at 19:55
  • Yes, I understand that if i populated the array in the constructor it will be visible to other threads but the point was that I am populating the array before the constructor and simply setting the rerference in the constructor. – nikdeapen Nov 20 '12 at 19:56
  • 1
    Exactly, so by the time the reference is set in the constructor the array is already populated, it's the same concept exactly. – Abdullah Jibaly Nov 20 '12 at 20:02
  • 4
    JLS § 17.5 "The usage model for final fields is a simple one: Set the final fields for an object in that object's constructor; and do not write a reference to the object being constructed in a place where another thread can see it before the object's constructor is finished. If this is followed, then when the object is seen by another thread, that thread will always see the correctly constructed version of that object's final fields. It will also see versions of any object or array referenced by those final fields that are at least as up-to-date as the final fields are." – Mike Clark Nov 20 '12 at 20:14
0

I found this is very helpful http://jeremymanson.blogspot.ch/2009/06/volatile-arrays-in-java.html So basically everything happens before volatile read is guaranteed to be seen by other threads. So there is some hack to make it happen. In addtion, jaa provide native AtomicReference/Long/Integer/...Array support. which will make sure update is visible to other threads.

-2

A lot of distinct concepts seem to be mixed up in your question.

  • visibility and final have nothing to do with one another
  • visibility and threads have nothing to do with one another
  • a private variable is not visible outside the class to any other code, regardless of whether it is final
  • a final array can still have its elements changed. It is only the reference to the array itself that is final.

When you construct your IntList object (and by the way, thanks for changing the name) like this:

public IntList(int[] array) {
    this.array = array;
}

the internal this.array field references the same array object that was passed to the constructor. The array could still be modified from outside the String class:

int[] array = {1, 2, 3};
IntList list = new IntList(array);
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(list.readElements()); // prints [1, 2, 3]
array[1] = 0;
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(list.readElements()); // prints [1, 0, 3]

You can insulate your class from this by making a copy of the array in the constructor:

public IntList(int[] array) {
    this.array = Arrays.copyOf(array, array.length);
}
  • 2
    But final does have to do with memory visibility. See e.g. cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/jsr-133-faq.html#finalRight Also the JLS § 17.5 "final fields also allow programmers to implement thread-safe immutable objects without synchronization. A thread-safe immutable object is seen as immutable by all threads, even if a data race is used to pass references to the immutable object between threads." The OP is clearly talking about memory visibility, not lexical visibility (scoping). – Mike Clark Nov 20 '12 at 20:01
  • @MikeClark Of course, not to be misleading, a final array is not immutable. The only way to ensure immutability of an array is to use scoped visibility so that the public access can be made to return copies. – Brian Nov 20 '12 at 20:04
  • 1
    @Brian A good point. A Java array is mutable, and so care must be taken. However, final can be used to make guarantees about the visibility of the contents of an array, if used with careful attention to the constraints of the JLS: "[Another thread] will also see versions of any object or array referenced by those final fields that are at least as up-to-date as the final fields are." – Mike Clark Nov 20 '12 at 20:11
  • @MikeClark - OP did not say "memory visibility"; it seems to me to be a question about whether array elements can be changed once the object is constructed. The Java Language Specification defines "visible" in terms of scoping: "A declaration d is said to be visible at point p in a program if the scope of d includes p, and d is not shadowed by any other declaration at p." This has nothing to do with the memory model. – Ted Hopp Nov 20 '12 at 20:18
  • 3
    @TedHopp He did not say "memory visibility", but he clearly implied it. His statement "I am wondering if the elements in the IntList are guaranteed to be visible by other threads". This exactly the kind of question the Java Memory Model sets out to answer. I agree "visibility" is an overloaded term, and without any other contextual clues I would assume the term "visibility" refers to scoping. But his mention of threading and specifically data visibility to other threads put his question firmly in the arena of memory visibility, not scoping. – Mike Clark Nov 20 '12 at 20:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.