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Given a ['0','1','1','2','3','3','3'] array, the result should be ['0','1','2','3'].

marked as duplicate by Bergi javascript Feb 24 '15 at 22:12

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  • 6
    Yeah dude jquery solves all problems. – Michael J. Calkins Jan 20 '14 at 20:49
  • 1
    You can use a utility library like underscore.js underscorejs.org/#uniq for these "easy" operations – Daan Feb 3 '14 at 9:51
  • 36
    Oh, the irony of a duplicate question. – Lucio Paiva Jul 11 '15 at 21:17
  • @LucioPaiva where's the array of duplicate questions??? 🤣🤣🤣 – dewd Apr 30 at 18:54

17 Answers 17

Edited

ES6 solution:

[...new Set(a)];

Alternative:

Array.from(new Set(a));

Old response. O(n^2) (do not use it with large arrays!)

var arrayUnique = function(a) {
    return a.reduce(function(p, c) {
        if (p.indexOf(c) < 0) p.push(c);
        return p;
    }, []);
};
  • 30
    Nonsense! You DO need to use semicolons! jsfiddle.net/bTNc2 – jack Nov 15 '13 at 14:52
  • 105
    It's 2014 now, so we need semicolons again. – tacone Jan 8 '14 at 17:35
  • 55
    It's 2015 now, so we don't need semicolons again. – Mark Knol Feb 24 '15 at 22:05
  • 47
    Will we need to use semicolons in 2016? – Saeid Yazdani Sep 13 '15 at 14:38
  • 27
    It is midway through 2016 now, and for the most part it's been a semicolons are optional but highly encouraged year. – trex005 Jun 7 '16 at 21:47

If you want to maintain order:

arr = arr.reverse().filter(function (e, i, arr) {
    return arr.indexOf(e, i+1) === -1;
}).reverse();

Since there's no built-in reverse indexof, I reverse the array, filter out duplicates, then re-reverse it.

The filter function looks for any occurence of the element after the current index (before in the original array). If one is found, it throws out this element.

Edit:

Alternatively, you could use lastindexOf (if you don't care about order):

arr = arr.filter(function (e, i, arr) {
    return arr.lastIndexOf(e) === i;
});

This will keep unique elements, but only the last occurrence. This means that ['0', '1', '0'] becomes ['1', '0'], not ['0', '1'].

  • Interesting solution, does lastIndexOf work? – Raekye Nov 21 '12 at 4:53
  • Kind of, but it depends on what you mean by that. You could use it if you didn't need order instead of the reverse() hack. – beatgammit Nov 21 '12 at 4:54
  • 2
    +1 for golfing. Unfortunately the straight for loop seems to perform better JSPerf. Damn function calls are so expensive. – merv Nov 21 '12 at 6:04
  • @merv - The OP said nothing about performance, so I got creative. Code's simple enough, no? – beatgammit Nov 21 '12 at 6:06
  • 1
    Nice! I like [1,2,3,1,1].filter(function(elem,idx,arr){ return arr.indexOf(elem) >= idx; }); better though, it's more straightforward – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 18 '13 at 14:27

Here is an Array Prototype function:

Array.prototype.unique = function() {
    var unique = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (unique.indexOf(this[i]) == -1) {
            unique.push(this[i]);
        }
    }
    return unique;
};
  • 2
    This is the easiest reading code XD – Huei Tan Oct 23 '14 at 2:34

With underscorejs

_.uniq([1, 2, 1, 3, 1, 4]); //=> [1, 2, 3, 4]
  • Would this work for array of arrays – vini Oct 29 '15 at 10:19

It's 2014 now guys, and time complexity still matters!

array.filter(function() {
  var seen = {};
  return function(element, index, array) {
    return !(element in seen) && (seen[element] = 1);
  };
}());

http://jsperf.com/array-filter-unique/13

function array_unique(arr) {
    var result = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        if (result.indexOf(arr[i]) == -1) {
            result.push(arr[i]);
        }
    }
    return result;
}

Not a built in function. If the product list does not contain the item, add it to unique list and return unique list.

  • 1
    Might want to mention that this won't work in IE8 or below.. – Stephen Nov 21 '12 at 5:00
  • Why would it not work in IE8? – extropic-engine Apr 11 '14 at 22:47
  • 1
    Perhaps because there's a closing parenthesis missing, it should be: result.push(arr[i]); – Jake Rowsell Oct 22 '14 at 13:47

There you go! You are welcome!

Array.prototype.unique = function()
{
    var tmp = {}, out = [];
    for(var i = 0, n = this.length; i < n; ++i)
    {
        if(!tmp[this[i]]) { tmp[this[i]] = true; out.push(this[i]); }
    }
    return out;
}

var a = [1,2,2,7,4,1,'a',0,6,9,'a'];
var b = a.unique();
alert(a);
alert(b);

You can find all kinds of array unique implementations here:

http://jsperf.com/distinct-hash-vs-comparison/12

http://jsperf.com/array-unique-functional

I prefer functional styles such as:

var arr = ['lol', 1, 'fdgdfg', 'lol', 'dfgfg', 'car', 1, 'car', 'a', 'blah', 'b', 'c', 'd', '0', '1', '1', '2', '3', '3', '3', 'crazy', 'moot', 'car', 'lol', 1, 'fdgdfg', 'lol', 'dfgfg', 'car', 1, 'car', 'a', 'blah', 'b', 'c', 'd', '0', '1', '1', '2', '3', '3', '3', 'crazy', 'moot', 'car', 'lol', 1, 'fdgdfg'];

var newarr = arr.reduce(function (prev, cur) {
    //console.log(prev, cur);
    if (prev.indexOf(cur) < 0) prev.push(cur);
    return prev;
}, []);

var secarr = arr.filter(function(element, index, array){
    //console.log(element, array.indexOf(element), index);
    return array.indexOf(element) >= index;
});

//reverses the order
var thirdarr = arr.filter(function (e, i, arr) {
    //console.log(e, arr.lastIndexOf(e), i);
    return arr.lastIndexOf(e) === i;
});

console.log(newarr);
console.log(secarr);
console.log(thirdarr);
  • I think most of the solutions proposed have a potential problem in that they are computation intensive. They will need O(n^2) operation at least (due to calling indexOf for each iteration). So when using a small array it is nice but not for large arrays. I am making this comment here as there is a link to a performance test and I think it is misleading due to data which is too small. – terrinecold Sep 9 '14 at 13:28
  • and here is a better performance study: shamasis.net/2009/09/… – terrinecold Sep 9 '14 at 13:34
  • @terrinecold terrific, you should post up an answer referencing that. Would be great if the javascript compiler/interpreter automatically optimised it. – CMCDragonkai Sep 11 '14 at 5:26
  • @terrinecold wait, the method posted in your link is the same one in the comparisons that I linked to, and it isn't always faster. I suppose it might be for larger arrays. – CMCDragonkai Sep 11 '14 at 5:32
function array_unique(nav_array) {
    nav_array = nav_array.sort(function (a, b) { return a*1 - b*1; });      
    var ret = [nav_array[0]];       
    // Start loop at 1 as element 0 can never be a duplicate
    for (var i = 1; i < nav_array.length; i++) { 
        if (nav_array[i-1] !== nav_array[i]) {              
            ret.push(nav_array[i]);             
        }       
    }
    return ret;     
}
  • Not a good implementation for something called array_unique because you rely on it being an numeric value. Even for a number-array-unique, I think parseInt would be better way to go (I could be wrong) – Raekye Nov 21 '12 at 4:56

This will work. Try it.

function getUnique(a) {
  var b = [a[0]], i, j, tmp;
  for (i = 1; i < a.length; i++) {
    tmp = 1;
    for (j = 0; j < b.length; j++) {
      if (a[i] == b[j]) {
        tmp = 0;
        break;
      }
    }
    if (tmp) {
      b.push(a[i]);
    }
  }
  return b;
}

I like to use this. There is nothing wrong with using the for loop, I just like using the build-in functions. You could even pass in a boolean argument for typecast or non typecast matching, which in that case you would use a for loop (the filter() method/function does typecast matching (===))

Array.prototype.unique =
function()
{
    return this.filter(
        function(val, i, arr)
        {
            return (i <= arr.indexOf(val));
        }
    );
}

No redundant "return" array, no ECMA5 (I'm pretty sure!) and simple to read.

function removeDuplicates(target_array) {
    target_array.sort();
    var i = 0;

    while(i < target_array.length) {
        if(target_array[i] === target_array[i+1]) {
            target_array.splice(i+1,1);
        }
        else {
            i += 1;
        }
    }
    return target_array;
}

Here is the way you can do remove duplicate values from the Array.

function ArrNoDupe(dupArray) {
   var temp = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < dupArray.length; i++) {
         temp[dupArray[i]] = true;
         var uniqueArray = [];
       for (var k in temp)
           uniqueArray.push(k);
 return uniqueArray;
    }
}

Another approach is to use an object for initial storage of the array information. Then convert back. For example:

var arr = ['0','1','1','2','3','3','3'];
var obj = {};

for(var i in arr) 
    obj[i] = true;

arr = [];
for(var i in obj) 
    arr.push(i);

Variable "arr" now contains ["0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6"]

  • Of course, this would only work for strings. – Bergi Feb 24 '15 at 22:09
  • …and the result should not contain the property names of the initial array, but the actual items. Expected: ['0', '1', '2', '3'] – Bergi Feb 24 '15 at 22:11

Those of you who work with google closure library, have at their disposal goog.array.removeDuplicates, which is the same as unique. It changes the array itself, though.

    //
    Array.prototype.unique =
    ( function ( _where ) {
      return function () {
        for (
          var
          i1 = 0,
          dups;
          i1 < this.length;
          i1++
        ) {
          if ( ( dups = _where( this, this[i1] ) ).length > 1 ) {
            for (
              var
              i2 = dups.length;
              --i2;
              this.splice( dups[i2], 1 )
            );
          }
        }
        return this;
      }
    } )(
      function ( arr, elem ) {
        var locs  = [];
        var tmpi  = arr.indexOf( elem, 0 );
        while (
          ( tmpi ^ -1 )
          && (
            locs.push( tmpi ),
            tmpi = arr.indexOf( elem, tmpi + 1 ), 1
          )
        );
        return locs;
      }
    );
    //
Array.prototype.unique =function(){
    var uniqObj={};
    for(var i=0;i< this.length;i++){
      uniqObj[this[i]]=this[i]; 
    }
    return uniqObj;
}
  • 4
    If you tested this out, or even gave an example of a test, you would have seen that this returns an object and not the desired output the user asked for. Please test your code next time. – bitoiu Mar 27 '14 at 11:05

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