1

I'm having some issues deallocating arrays of a class I have. Below is the Class, a simplified implementation and my code I have tried to use to close it.

Characters class

#include <cstdlib>


class Character
{
   private:

            bool human;
            int Xposition;  // the character's postion on the board.
            int Yposition;  // the character's postion on the board.
            bool alive;


   public:

            Character();        //This is my constructor
            ~Character();       //This is my destructor
            bool isHuman();     //return whether type 1 aka Human
            bool isZombie();    //return whether type 2 aka Zombie
            void setHuman();    //set to type 1 or Human
            void setZombie();   //set to type 2 or Zombie
            void setPos(int xpos, int ypos);        //set the board position
            int X(); 
            int Y();
            bool isAlive();     //checks to see if a Human is still alive and to be displayed
            bool Dead();        //kills the character and sets alive to false
            int num_moves_allowed; //number of moves allowed.


};

Allocation code:

Character *characters[11];
int human_count = 0;

for(int i=0; i<12; i++)
{
    characters[human_count] = new Character();
    human_count++;
}

Termination code:

for(i=11;i<=0;i--)
    {
        if(characters) 
        {
            characters[i]->~Character();
            delete characters[i]; characters[i] = NULL;
        }

    }
    if(characters) 
    {
            //ERROR IS HERE
            delete [] characters;
    }

I have tried a number of different "delete" commands on the array and I keep getting an "Debug Assertion Failed!" window. It says that the dbgdel.cpp from visual studio vctools is the problem place on Line 52.
It also says "Expression: _BLOCK_TYPE_IS_VALID(pHead->nBlockUse)

Someone please help me I'm sure this is very simple.

  • 5
    You should never call the destructor explicitly. That's done automatically when you delete the object. – Adrian Grigore Aug 28 '09 at 19:28
  • 1
    On a side note, are those your actual comments or post-ified? – GManNickG Aug 28 '09 at 20:22
  • comments in the code above I put in, some just for your guys. This is still in very early dev. I'm the only one working on it so if some of it is wrong from cutting and pasting, I could care less right now. ;) – DarkUnderlord Aug 29 '09 at 3:39
10

I'd suggest you avoid using arrays all together. Use a vector of characters.

Declare your vector as

vector<Character> vCharacters;

then insert objects as

for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
   vCharacters.push_back(Character());

If you want to store pointers to Character objects then wrap them in a shared_ptr which will take care of deallocating them for you.

vector<shared_ptr<Character>> vCharacters;
for(int i =0; i < 100; i++)
{
       shared_ptr<Character> spCharacter(new Character());
       vCharacters.push_back(spCharacter);
}

Avoid managing memory yourself when C++ can do it fo ryou

  • Would upvote twice if I could. – luke Aug 28 '09 at 19:36
  • honestly I've never used vectors before in C++. I first learned C++ back around 1995. I need to be able to get to these arrays quickly to check properties etc for the arrays. – DarkUnderlord Aug 28 '09 at 19:38
  • 3
    So are you assuming vectors are slow or don't let you do that? – GManNickG Aug 28 '09 at 19:52
  • 4
    I agree with your answer (and upvoted it), but please - no Hungarian notation. – anon Aug 28 '09 at 20:05
  • "This of course will not create you Character objects on the heap" - yes it will. The contents of vectors are always created on the heap. – anon Aug 28 '09 at 20:15
5

The characters array was allocated on the stack, so you don't have to delete it. However, if you want the array to survive the local scope, create it with something like this:

Character **characters = new Character[11];

then your delete[] line should work fine.

Also note that you don't need to call the destructor of Character explicitly: it is called automatically by delete.

  • LOL I know about the destructor automatically running, I was just at my end of trying anything. :) Now I'm getting "Error 5 error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'Character *' to 'Character **' on the line that says "characters[human_count] = new Character();" – DarkUnderlord Aug 28 '09 at 19:35
  • I'm tracking players on a grid (like chess) so it's important I can loop through them quickly and align the loop variable to another array at the same time. – DarkUnderlord Aug 28 '09 at 19:42
  • 5
    std::vector, when compiling with optimizations enabled, is exactly as fast as a plain dynamic array for all indexing operations. – Pavel Minaev Aug 28 '09 at 20:12
2

As obelix mentioned, you should use a vector from the Standard Template Library. However, if you're determined to use a raw array:

const int MAX_CHARACTERS = 11;
Character *characters[MAX_CHARACTERS];

for(int characterCount = 0; characterCount < MAX_CHARACTERS; ++characterCount)
{
  characters[characterCount] = new Character();
}

...

if (characters != NULL)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < MAX_CHARACTERS; ++i)
  {
    delete characters[i];
  }
}

Paolo Capriotti is correct that characters should be declared with new if you want it to last beyond its scope:

const int MAX_CHARACTERS = 11;
Character **characters = new Character*[MAX_CHARACTERS];

for(int characterCount = 0; characterCount < MAX_CHARACTERS; ++characterCount)
{
  characters[characterCount] = new Character();
}

...

if (characters != NULL)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < MAX_CHARACTERS; ++i)
  {
    delete characters[i];
  }
  delete [] characters;
}

A better solution is the standard vector class:

#include <vector>

...

const int MAX_CHARACTERS = 11;
std::vector<Character> characters;

for (int i = 0; i < MAX_CHARACTERS; ++i)
{
  characters.push_back(Character());
}

...

characters.clear();

Notice how much easier the cleanup was? (And in this case, it's optional, since when characters is destroyed it will automatically call the destructor of each item it contains.)

  • The second example is wrong. "new Character[MAX_CHARACTERS]" creates an array of Character objects, but then you go through and manually create an array of Character objects, overwriting (and leaking) the first ones. "delete [] characters" will try probably crash since it's deleting an array of already-deleted objects. – Graeme Perrow Aug 28 '09 at 20:08
  • 1
    Never mind my comment - there was a typo in the example. It should have been "new Character *[MAX_CHARACTERS]", which is allocating an array of pointers, not an array of objects. I fixed the example and removed my downvote. :-) – Graeme Perrow Aug 28 '09 at 20:20
  • Ah, thanks! I was writing in a hurry, and didn't proofread as well as I should have. – Bill Aug 28 '09 at 21:29
0

Also:

Character *characters[11];

should be

Character *characters[12];

and

for(i=11;i<=0;i--)

should be

for(i=11;i>=0;i--)
  • LOL, yeah that is pretty obvious, silly me. :) – DarkUnderlord Aug 28 '09 at 19:44
0

i realize this is a simplified use and all, but why bother with heap access at all?

just using

Character characters[11];

could be just as valid, and safe.

std::vector<> is nice, but if the list is always fixed size, and there's no heap involved in member data, why not?

  • In this case it's probably fine, but be careful if you have large classes. – Graeme Perrow Aug 28 '09 at 20:15
  • It also requires that Character be default constructible, which vector does not. In this case it is - wrongly, I think. – anon Aug 28 '09 at 20:19

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