935

Given:

a = 1
b = 10
c = 100

How do I display a leading zero for all numbers with less than two digits?

This is the output I'm expecting:

01
10
100

16 Answers 16

1114

In Python 2 (and Python 3) you can do:

print "%02d" % (1,)

Basically % is like printf or sprintf (see docs).


For Python 3.+, the same behavior can also be achieved with format:

print("{:02d}".format(1))

For Python 3.6+ the same behavior can be achieved with f-strings:

print(f"{1:02d}")
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Example: print "%05d" % result['postalCode'] for a 5 digit postal code. – Nick Woodhams Jun 5 '12 at 12:08
  • 3
    x = "%02d.txt" % i raises TypeError (cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects), but x = "%02d.txt" % (i,) does not. Interesting. I wonder where is that documented – theta Nov 5 '12 at 18:10
  • 1
    @theta In 2.7.6, I don't get an error. Maybe this was a bug in a specific version of Python that they've since fixed? – Jack M. Apr 4 '14 at 14:51
  • 2
    Maybe. In 2.7.6 there is no exception if format value isn't tuple (at least for this example). Looking at the date of my comment I guess I was running 2.7.3 back then, and at that time I didn't know that putting single variable in a tuple gets you on a safe side while using % string formater. – theta Apr 4 '14 at 15:41
  • 2
    To elaborate, the docs explain this here: "When no explicit alignment is given, preceding the width field by a zero ('0') character enables sign-aware zero-padding for numeric types. This is equivalent to a fill character of '0' with an alignment type of '='." – JHS Mar 30 '16 at 19:48
963

You can use str.zfill:

print(str(1).zfill(2))
print(str(10).zfill(2))
print(str(100).zfill(2))

prints:

01
10
100
| improve this answer | |
  • 72
    I like this solution, as it helps not only when outputting the number, but when you need to assign it to a variable... e.g. x = str(datetime.date.today().month).zfill(2) will return x as '02' for the month of feb. – EroSan Feb 24 '11 at 17:33
  • 3
    This should be the correct answer, since the "{1:02d}" cannot have variables in place of 2 (like if you are creating a dynamic function). – Joshua Varghese May 20 at 10:37
365

In Python 2.6+ and 3.0+, you would use the format() string method:

for i in (1, 10, 100):
    print('{num:02d}'.format(num=i))

or using the built-in (for a single number):

print(format(i, '02d'))

See the PEP-3101 documentation for the new formatting functions.

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  • 29
    Works in Python 2.7.5 as well. You can also use '{:02d}'.format(1) if you don't want to use named arguments. – Jason Martens Jan 7 '14 at 14:20
  • 1
    Works fine in 2.7.2, with a floating point "{0:04.0f}".format(1.1) gives 0001 (:04 = at least 4 characters, in this case leading 0's, .0f = floating point with no decimals). I am aware of the % formatting but wanted to modify an existing .format statement without rewriting the whole thing. Thanks! – Michael Stimson Jul 21 '15 at 1:31
129
print('{:02}'.format(1))
print('{:02}'.format(10))
print('{:02}'.format(100))

prints:

01
10
100
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This way let you repeat the argument several times within the string: One zero:{0:02}, two zeros: {0:03}, ninezeros: {0:010}'.format(6) – srodriguex Apr 14 '14 at 21:00
  • 2
    Only compatible with Python 3. If using Python 2.7, do print '{:02}'.format(1) – Blairg23 Jan 31 '17 at 23:30
89

Or this:

print '{0:02d}'.format(1)

| improve this answer | |
75

In Python >= 3.6, you can do this succinctly with the new f-strings that were introduced by using:

f'{val:02}'

which prints the variable with name val with a fill value of 0 and a width of 2.

For your specific example you can do this nicely in a loop:

a, b, c = 1, 10, 100
for val in [a, b, c]:
    print(f'{val:02}')

which prints:

01 
10
100

For more information on f-strings, take a look at PEP 498 where they were introduced.

| improve this answer | |
57
x = [1, 10, 100]
for i in x:
    print '%02d' % i

results in:

01
10
100

Read more information about string formatting using % in the documentation.

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  • 9
    The documentation example sucks. They throw mapping in with the leading zero sample, so it's hard to know which is which unless you already know how it works. Thats what brought me here, actually. – Grant Jul 1 '09 at 17:52
50

The Pythonic way to do this:

str(number).rjust(string_width, fill_char)

This way, the original string is returned unchanged if its length is greater than string_width. Example:

a = [1, 10, 100]
for num in a:
    print str(num).rjust(2, '0')

Results:

01
10
100
| improve this answer | |
33

Or another solution.

"{:0>2}".format(number)
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  • 3
    This would be the Python way, although I would include the parameter for clarity - "{0:0>2}".format(number), if someone will wants nLeadingZeros they should note they can also do:"{0:0>{1}}".format(number, nLeadingZeros + 1) – Jonathan Allan Apr 24 '16 at 18:33
5

Use a format string - http://docs.python.org/lib/typesseq-strings.html

For example:

python -c 'print "%(num)02d" % {"num":5}'
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4

This is how I do it:

str(1).zfill(len(str(total)))

Basically zfill takes the number of leading zeros you want to add, so it's easy to take the biggest number, turn it into a string and get the length, like this:

Python 3.6.5 (default, May 11 2018, 04:00:52) 
[GCC 8.1.0] on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> total = 100
>>> print(str(1).zfill(len(str(total))))
001
>>> total = 1000
>>> print(str(1).zfill(len(str(total))))
0001
>>> total = 10000
>>> print(str(1).zfill(len(str(total))))
00001
>>> 
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1
width = 5
num = 3
formatted = (width - len(str(num))) * "0" + str(num)
print formatted
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1

You can do this with f strings.

import numpy as np

print(f'{np.random.choice([1, 124, 13566]):0>8}')

This will print constant length of 8, and pad the rest with leading 0.

00000001
00000124
00013566
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0

Use:

'00'[len(str(i)):] + str(i)

Or with the math module:

import math
'00'[math.ceil(math.log(i, 10)):] + str(i)
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-1
df['Col1']=df['Col1'].apply(lambda x: '{0:0>5}'.format(x))

The 5 is the number of total digits.

I used this link: http://www.datasciencemadesimple.com/add-leading-preceding-zeros-python/

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-2

If dealing with numbers that are either one or two digits:

'0'+str(number)[-2:] or '0{0}'.format(number)[-2:]

| improve this answer | |

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