Given:

a = 1
b = 10
c = 100

How do I display a leading zero for all numbers with less than two digits?

That is,

01
10
100

16 Answers 16

up vote 652 down vote accepted

Here you are:

print "%02d" % (1,)

Basically % is like printf or sprintf.

  • 4
    Example: print "%05d" % result['postalCode'] for a 5 digit postal code. – Nick Woodhams Jun 5 '12 at 12:08
  • 1
    x = "%02d.txt" % i raises TypeError (cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects), but x = "%02d.txt" % (i,) does not. Interesting. I wonder where is that documented – theta Nov 5 '12 at 18:10
  • 1
    Maybe. In 2.7.6 there is no exception if format value isn't tuple (at least for this example). Looking at the date of my comment I guess I was running 2.7.3 back then, and at that time I didn't know that putting single variable in a tuple gets you on a safe side while using % string formater. – theta Apr 4 '14 at 15:41
  • 1
    To elaborate, the docs explain this here: "When no explicit alignment is given, preceding the width field by a zero ('0') character enables sign-aware zero-padding for numeric types. This is equivalent to a fill character of '0' with an alignment type of '='." – JHS Mar 30 '16 at 19:48
  • 31
    In Python3 use "{:02}".format(1) – Aziz Alto Oct 16 '16 at 19:57

You can use str.zfill:

print str(1).zfill(2) 
print str(10).zfill(2) 
print str(100).zfill(2) 

prints:

01
10
100
  • 57
    I like this solution, as it helps not only when outputting the number, but when you need to assign it to a variable... e.g. x = str(datetime.date.today().month).zfill(2) will return x as '02' for the month of feb. – EroSan Feb 24 '11 at 17:33

In Python 2.6+ and 3.0+, you would use the format() string method:

for i in (1, 10, 100):
    print('{num:02d}'.format(num=i))

or using the built-in (for a single number):

print(format(i, '02d'))

See the PEP-3101 documentation for the new formatting functions.

  • 29
    Works in Python 2.7.5 as well. You can also use '{:02d}'.format(1) if you don't want to use named arguments. – Jason Martens Jan 7 '14 at 14:20
  • 1
    Works fine in 2.7.2, with a floating point "{0:04.0f}".format(1.1) gives 0001 (:04 = at least 4 characters, in this case leading 0's, .0f = floating point with no decimals). I am aware of the % formatting but wanted to modify an existing .format statement without rewriting the whole thing. Thanks! – Michael Stimson Jul 21 '15 at 1:31
print('{:02}'.format(1))
print('{:02}'.format(10))
print('{:02}'.format(100))

prints:

01
10
100
  • 1
    This way let you repeat the argument several times within the string: One zero:{0:02}, two zeros: {0:03}, ninezeros: {0:010}'.format(6) – srodriguex Apr 14 '14 at 21:00
  • 2
    Only compatible with Python 3. If using Python 2.7, do print '{:02}'.format(1) – Blairg23 Jan 31 '17 at 23:30

Or this:

print '{0:02d}'.format(1)

x = [1, 10, 100]
for i in x:
    print '%02d' % i

results in:

01
10
100

Read more information about string formatting using % in the documentation.

  • 9
    The documentation example sucks. They throw mapping in with the leading zero sample, so it's hard to know which is which unless you already know how it works. Thats what brought me here, actually. – Grant Jul 1 '09 at 17:52

In Python >= 3.6, you can do this succinctly with the new f-strings that were introduced by using:

f'{val:02}'

which prints the variable with name val with a fill value of 0 and a width of 2.

For your specific example you can do this nicely in a loop:

a, b, c = 1, 10, 100
for val in {a, b, c}:
    print(f'{val:02}')

which prints:

01 
10
100

For more information on f-strings, take a look at PEP 498 that introduced them.

The Pythonic way to do this:

str(number).rjust(string_width, fill_char)

This way, the original string is returned unchanged if its length is greater than string_width. Example:

a = [1, 10, 100]
for num in a:
    print str(num).rjust(2, '0')

Results:

01
10
100
  • Magic of python ! Great answer – SAAD Dec 1 '14 at 0:27
  • great solutions!!! – MrRobot Dec 19 '17 at 7:34

Or another solution.

"{:0>2}".format(number)
  • 2
    It is more clear, Thank you . – WaKo Jan 21 '16 at 11:20
  • 3
    This would be the Python way, although I would include the parameter for clarity - "{0:0>2}".format(number), if someone will wants nLeadingZeros they should note they can also do:"{0:0>{1}}".format(number, nLeadingZeros + 1) – Jonathan Allan Apr 24 '16 at 18:33

Use a format string - http://docs.python.org/lib/typesseq-strings.html

For example:

python -c 'print "%(num)02d" % {"num":5}'
width = 5
num = 3
formatted = (width - len(str(num))) * "0" + str(num)
print formatted

Use:

'00'[len(str(i)):] + str(i)

Or with the math module:

import math
'00'[math.ceil(math.log(i, 10)):] + str(i)

This is how I do it:

str(1).zfill(len(str(total)))

Basically zfill takes the number of leading zeros you want to add, so it's easy to take the biggest number, turn it into a string and get the length, like this:

Python 3.6.5 (default, May 11 2018, 04:00:52) 
[GCC 8.1.0] on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> total = 100
>>> print(str(1).zfill(len(str(total))))
001
>>> total = 1000
>>> print(str(1).zfill(len(str(total))))
0001
>>> total = 10000
>>> print(str(1).zfill(len(str(total))))
00001
>>> 

Based on your tips, I let my working function. Thank you.

def number2binlist(number, leading = 8):
    #Convert Binary to 0/1 list array with leading zeros, default 8
    bin2dec = int(str(bin(number))[2:])
    theformat = "{:0"+str(leading)+"d}"
    dec2str = list(theformat.format(bin2dec))
    output = [int(z) for z in dec2str]
    output.reverse()
    return output
  • What question are you answering? – E.Coms Oct 18 at 14:49
s=1    
s="%02d"%s    
print(s)

the result will be 01

  • While this might answer the authors question, it lacks some explaining words and links to documentation. Raw code snippets are not very helpful without some phrases around it. You may also find how to write a good answer very helpful. Please edit your answer. – hellow Nov 1 at 7:46

If dealing with numbers that are either one or two digits:

'0'+str(number)[-2:] or '0{0}'.format(number)[-2:]

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.