14

I am trying to initialize a constexpr declaration with a pointer to int which is a const object. I also try to define an object with a object that is not a const type.

Code:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
constexpr int *np = nullptr; // np is a constant to int that points to null;
int j = 0;
constexpr int i = 42; // type of i is const int
constexpr const int *p = &i; // p is a constant pointer to the const int i;
constexpr int *p1 = &j; // p1 is a constant pointer to the int j; 
}

g++ log:

constexpr.cc:8:27: error: ‘& i’ is not a constant expression
constexpr.cc:9:22: error: ‘& j’ is not a constant expression

I believe it is because the objects in main have no fixed addresses, thus g++ is throwing error messages back at me; how would I correct this? Without using literal types.

8
  • Well, yeah. Variables only have addresses at runtime when they are assigned one.
    – chris
    Nov 21, 2012 at 18:24
  • @chris Yes. How would I define a function to have its objects to have a fixed address? Would I just declare the function as constexpr?
    – TheBlueCat
    Nov 21, 2012 at 18:27
  • @chris Can you explain your point more? The whole point of constexpr is that is defined at compiletime with mainly literal types (they're expections). My point is objects within functions have temporary addresses assigned to them (for obvious reasons). Here g++ is throwing me the error messages due to those temp memory addresses. How could I declare a function that would not do this (ie, allow all objects to be fixed during control of flow).
    – TheBlueCat
    Nov 21, 2012 at 18:32
  • I highly doubt you can associate addresses or pointers to variables with constexpr at all.
    – chris
    Nov 21, 2012 at 18:35
  • 1
    Unfortunately this example works fine in VS 2015. Poor Microsoft. Nov 13, 2015 at 8:12

1 Answer 1

21

Make them static to fix their addresses:

int main()
{
  constexpr int *np = nullptr; // np is a constant to int that points to null;
  static int j = 0;
  static constexpr int i = 42; // type of i is const int
  constexpr const int *p = &i; // p is a constant pointer to the const int i;
  constexpr int *p1 = &j; // p1 is a constant pointer to the int j; 
}

This is known as an address constant expression [5.19p3]:

An address constant expression is a prvalue core constant expression of pointer type that evaluates to the address of an object with static storage duration, to the address of a function, or to a null pointer value, or a prvalue core constant expression of type std::nullptr_t.

4
  • Isn't the address of a static variable defined at link-time, not at compile-time?
    – anton_rh
    Aug 8, 2018 at 7:07
  • @anton_rh: Yes, the address is determined at link-time. That does not conflict with my answer above though.
    – Jesse Good
    Aug 8, 2018 at 13:22
  • 1
    @JesseGood I think it's a good point to elaborate on, though. That a constexpr can be a value resolved after compile time.
    – sh1
    Jan 25, 2021 at 4:32
  • If you look at the implementation then you see what actually happens is that the compiler will generate a constant + a linker reference how to fix up the constant relative to the link address. Feb 12 at 14:22

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