25

This article on MSDN states that you can use as many try catch blocks as you want and not incur any performance cost as long no actual exception is thrown.
Since I always believed that a try-catch always takes a small performance hit even when not throwing the exception, I made a little test.

 private void TryCatchPerformance()
        {
            int iterations = 100000000;

            Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            int c = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                try
                {
                   // c += i * (2 * (int)Math.Floor((double)i));
                    c += i * 2;
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    throw;
                }
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            WriteLog(String.Format("With try catch: {0}", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

            Stopwatch stopwatch2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            int c2 = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
              //  c2 += i * (2 * (int)Math.Floor((double)i));
                c2 += i * 2;
            }
            stopwatch2.Stop();
            WriteLog(String.Format("Without try catch: {0}", stopwatch2.ElapsedMilliseconds));
        }

The output I get:

With try catch: 68
Without try catch: 34

So it seems that using no try-catch block seems to be faster after all?

What I find even more strange is that when I replace the computation in the body of the for-loops by something more complex like: c += i * (2 * (int)Math.Floor((double)i));
The difference is far less dramatic.

With try catch: 640
Without try catch: 655

Am I doing something wrong here or is there a logical explanation for this?

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  • 1
    You merely demonstrate that benchmarking is much more difficult than it looks. For starters you should repeat the measurements with the two blocks reversed. – Henk Holterman Aug 29 '09 at 9:23
  • Reversing the two blocks does not give any significant differences in the output. Can you elaborate why this is important? – Mez Aug 29 '09 at 15:06
  • 1
    Bit late to the party. But its because the JIT may have made optimisation decisions which effect the second run. – Hector May 27 '15 at 9:17
15

The JIT doesn't perform optimization on 'protected' / 'try' blocks and I guess depending on the code you write in try/catch blocks, this will affect your performance.

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  • 3
    You can refer this link: msmvps.com/blogs/peterritchie/archive/2007/06/22/… – P.K Aug 29 '09 at 17:38
  • 4
    This answer is simply not true. Optimizations are not disabled, they may just not be applicable in a try block. Adding a try catch block does not disable optimization. Adding a try block can change the possible execution paths of your code, which may or may not change the set of optimizations the jit can perform. The biggest issues it seems are variables that penetrate across the try block itself: EX int count = 0; try { ... count++; ... } finally { print(count); } – Robert Beuligmann Dec 30 '13 at 22:41
14

The try/catch/finally/fault block itself has essentially no overhead itself in an optimized release assembly. While there is often additional IL added for catch and finally blocks, when no exception is thrown, there is little difference in behavior. Rather than a simple ret, there is usually a leave to a later ret.

The true cost of try/catch/finally blocks occurs when handling an exception. In such cases, an exception must be created, stack crawl marks must be placed, and, if the exception is handled and its StackTrace property accessed, a stack walk is incurred. The heaviest operation is the stack trace, which follows the previously set stack crawl marks to build up a StackTrace object that may be used to display the location the error happened and the calls it bubbled through.

If there is no behavior in a try/catch block, then the extra cost of 'leave to ret' vs. just 'ret' will dominate, and there will obviously be a measurable difference. However, in any other situation where there is some kind of behavior in the try clause, the cost of the block itself will be entirely negated.

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6

Note that I only have Mono available:

// a.cs
public class x {
    static void Main() {
        int x = 0;
        x += 5;
        return ;
    }
}


// b.cs
public class x {
    static void Main() {
        int x = 0;
        try {
            x += 5;
        } catch (System.Exception) {
            throw;
        }
        return ;
    }
}

Disassembling these:

// a.cs
       default void Main ()  cil managed
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x20f4
    .entrypoint
    // Code size 7 (0x7)
    .maxstack 3
    .locals init (
            int32   V_0)
    IL_0000:  ldc.i4.0
    IL_0001:  stloc.0
    IL_0002:  ldloc.0
    IL_0003:  ldc.i4.5
    IL_0004:  add
    IL_0005:  stloc.0
    IL_0006:  ret
} // end of method x::Main

and

// b.cs
      default void Main ()  cil managed
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x20f4
    .entrypoint
    // Code size 20 (0x14)
    .maxstack 3
    .locals init (
            int32   V_0)
    IL_0000:  ldc.i4.0
    IL_0001:  stloc.0
    .try { // 0
      IL_0002:  ldloc.0
      IL_0003:  ldc.i4.5
      IL_0004:  add
      IL_0005:  stloc.0
      IL_0006:  leave IL_0013

    } // end .try 0
    catch class [mscorlib]System.Exception { // 0
      IL_000b:  pop
      IL_000c:  rethrow
      IL_000e:  leave IL_0013

    } // end handler 0
    IL_0013:  ret
} // end of method x::Main

The main difference I see is a.cs goes straight to ret at IL_0006, whereas b.cs has to leave IL_0013 at IL_006. My best guess with my example, is that the leave is a (relatively) expensive jump when compiled to machine code -- that may or may not be the case, especially in your for loop. That is to say, the try-catch has no inherent overhead, but jumping over the catch has a cost, like any conditional branch.

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  • +1 for the effort but the for-loop is really the dominant factor here. – Henk Holterman Aug 29 '09 at 9:25
4

the actual computation is so minimal that accurate measurements are very tricky. It looks to me like try catch might add a very small fixed amount of extra time to the routine. I would hazard to guess, not knowing anything about how exceptions are implemented in C#, that this is mostly just initialization of the exception paths and perhaps just a slight load on the JIT.

For any actual use, the time spent on the computation will so overwhelm the time spent fiddling with try-catch that the cost of try-catch can be taken as near zero.

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2

The Problem is first at your Test Code. you used stopwatch.Elapsed.Milliseconds which shows only the milisecond part of the Elapsed time, use TotalMilliseconds to get the whole part...

If no exception is thrown, the difference is minimal

But the real question is "Do i need to check for exceptions or let C# handle the Exception throwing?"

Clearly... handle alone... Try running this:

private void TryCatchPerformance()
    {
        int iterations = 10000;
        textBox1.Text = "";
        Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int c = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            try
            {   
                c += i / (i % 50);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {

            }
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Debug.WriteLine(String.Format("With try catch: {0}", stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds));

        Stopwatch stopwatch2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int c2 = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            int iMod50 = (i%50);
            if(iMod50 > 0)
                c2 += i / iMod50;
        }
        stopwatch2.Stop();
        Debug.WriteLine( String.Format("Without try catch: {0}", stopwatch2.Elapsed.TotalSeconds));

    }

Output: OBSOLETE : Look below! With try catch: 1.9938401

Without try catch: 8.92E-05

Amazing, only 10000 objects, with 200 Exceptions.

CORRECTION: I Run my code on DEBUG and VS Written Exception to Output window.. These are the Results of the RELEASE A lot less overhead, but still 7,500 % improvement.

With try catch: 0.0546915

Checking Alone: 0.0007294

With try catch Throwing my own same Exception object: 0.0265229

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  • Given his test shows greater than one millisecond differences, showing microseconds doesn't appear to be very useful – headsling Mar 22 '12 at 13:51
0

See discussion on try/catch implementation for a discussion of how try/catch blocks work, and how some implementations have high overhead, and some have zero overhead, when no exceptions occur.

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0

A difference of just 34 milliseconds is smaller than the margin-of-error for a test like this.

As you've noticed, when you increase the duration of the test that difference just falls away and the performance of the two sets of code is effectively the same.

When doing this sort of benchmark I try to loop over each section of code for at least 20 seconds, preferably longer, and ideally for several hours.

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