40

I have a struct as follows, with a pointer to a function called "length" that will return the length of the chars member.

typedef struct pstring_t {
    char * chars;
    int (* length)();
} PString;

I have a function to return the length of the characters from a pointer to a PString:

int length(PString * self) {
    return strlen(self->chars);
}

I have a function initializeString() that returns a pointer to a PString:

PString * initializeString() {
    PString *str;
    str->length = &length;
    return str;
}

It is clear that I am doing something very wrong with my pointers here, because the str->length = &length line causes an EXC_BAD_ACCESS signal in my debugger, as does `return strlen(self->chars). Does anyone have any insights into this problem?

I specifically want to be able have the initializeString() function return a pointer to a PString, and the length function to use a pointer to a PString as input. This is just an experiment in implementing a rudimentary object-oriented system in C, but I don't have a lot of experience dealing with pointers head-on. Thanks for any help you can give me.

  • 2
    Although you say you specifically want to return a pointer. In this case, returning a struct itself is far better. It's a cheap to copy struct, and there is no need for a heavy weight heap allocation. String objects are value-based: They do not have identity (address), but their equality is based on their content. You could have this sense of distinction in your OOP system too, somehow. – Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 29 '09 at 16:41
54

Allocate memory to hold chars.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct PString {
        char *chars;
        int (*length)();
} PString;

int length(PString *self) {
    return strlen(self->chars);
}

PString *initializeString(int n) {
    PString *str = malloc(sizeof(PString));

    str->chars = malloc(sizeof(char) * n);
    str->length = length;

    str[0] = '\0'; //add a null terminator in case the string is used before any other initialization.

    return str;
}

int main() {
    PString *p = initializeString(30);
    strcpy(p->chars, "Hello");
    printf("\n%d", p->length(p));
    return 0;
}
  • Great answer! Question: I need to call free(p), but do I also need to free the chars? – Jonathan Sterling Aug 29 '09 at 4:15
  • 12
    There's no need to cast the return value of malloc in C. Also, you should initialise str->chars after you allocate it (ie. str->chars[0] = '\0';). – caf Aug 29 '09 at 4:41
  • 3
    Does the function pointer int (* length)() need/not need to identify the PString * parameter? – Ephemera Oct 9 '13 at 23:26
  • 1
    @ephemera has a point. You have to use the full prototype of the function. I tried without specifying the function's arguments in the PString-structure and I get an error. If I write int (* length)(PString *self);, it works fine. – rbaleksandar Nov 8 '13 at 11:41
  • 1
    Why does initializeString use str->length = length; instead of str->length = &length;? Does it automatically get reduced to a pointer with that usage? – Jacob Phillips Nov 22 '13 at 22:11
6

My guess is that part of your problem is the parameter lists not matching.

int (* length)();

and

int length(PString * self)

are not the same. It should be int (* length)(PString *);.

...woah, it's Jon!

Edit: and, as mentioned below, your struct pointer is never set to point to anything. The way you're doing it would only work if you were declaring a plain struct, not a pointer.

str = (PString *)malloc(sizeof(PString));
  • Thanks a lot, Jacob. I'll go ahead and try that. – Jonathan Sterling Aug 29 '09 at 3:53
  • OK, strlen(self->chars) still gives me EXC_BAD_ACCESS. – Jonathan Sterling Aug 29 '09 at 3:57
4

The pointer str is never allocated. It should be malloc'd before use.

  • Replace PString *str; with PString *str = (PString *)malloc(sizeof(PString)); And ideally, call free with the pointer when done using it to avoid memory leaks. – jgottula Aug 29 '09 at 3:54
4

Maybe I am missing something here, but did you allocate any memory for that PString before you accessed it?

PString * initializeString() {
    PString *str;
    str = (PString *) malloc(sizeof(PString));
    str->length = &length;
    return str;
}
  • Stop casting malloc please. Don't need to do that in C. – ytpillai Jul 15 '18 at 23:37
0

You can use also "void*" (void pointer) to send an address to the function.

typedef struct pstring_t {
    char * chars;
    int(*length)(void*);
} PString;

int length(void* self) {
    return strlen(((PString*)self)->chars);
}

PString initializeString() {
    PString str;
    str.length = &length;
    return str;
}

int main()
{
    PString p = initializeString();

    p.chars = "Hello";

    printf("Length: %i\n", p.length(&p));

    return 0;
}

Output:

Length: 5
  • Beware! This leads to undefined behavior, since the variable PString str; in initializeString() does not exist, when you access it through pointer in main(). – Kupto Mar 28 '18 at 11:29

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