179

I have a command which I am executing from my XAML file using the following standard syntax:

<Button Content="Zoom" Command="{Binding MyViewModel.ZoomCommand}"/>

This worked fine until I realized that I needed TWO pieces of information from the view in order to make this operation complete the way users expect (the width and height of the canvas specfically).

It seems like it's possible to pass an array as an argument to my command, but I don't see there being a way to specify the binding to my two canvas properties in the CommandParameter:

<Button Content="Zoom" 
        Command="{Binding MyViewModel.ZoomCommand" 
        CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=MyCanvas, Path=Width}"/>

How do I pass both Width and Height to my command? It doesn't seem like this is possible using commands from XAML and I need to wire up a click handler in my codebehind to get this information to pass to my zoom method.

1

6 Answers 6

287

Firstly, if you're doing MVVM you would typically have this information available to your VM via separate properties bound from the view. That saves you having to pass any parameters at all to your commands.

However, you could also multi-bind and use a converter to create the parameters:

<Button Content="Zoom" Command="{Binding MyViewModel.ZoomCommand">
    <Button.CommandParameter>
        <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource YourConverter}">
             <Binding Path="Width" ElementName="MyCanvas"/>
             <Binding Path="Height" ElementName="MyCanvas"/>
        </MultiBinding>
    </Button.CommandParameter>
</Button>

In your converter:

public class YourConverter : IMultiValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object[] values, ...)
    {
        return values.Clone();
    }

    ...
}

Then, in your command execution logic:

public void OnExecute(object parameter)
{
    var values = (object[])parameter;
    var width = (double)values[0];
    var height = (double)values[1];
}
8
  • 1
    Thanks Kent - that was exactly what I was looking for. I like your first approach better so that the VM knows the "state" of the view through a binding without me having to pass parameters at all, but I can still test it. I'm not sure that's going to work for me here, as I need the view to make the canvas as big as possible and pass this value to the VM. If I bind it, won't I have to set the width in the VM? In which case, the VM is bound to the view?
    – JasonD
    Aug 29, 2009 at 18:32
  • @Jason: you can do it either way. That is, have the view push changes back to the view model, or have the view model push changes to the view. A TwoWay binding will result in either option being available to you. Aug 29, 2009 at 19:08
  • in my program OnExecute method parameter is a array with null values but, in the converter the values are as expected Mar 6, 2014 at 3:34
  • 3
    I find that parameter is null in OnExecute method, also YourConverter.Convert() wasn't called after click the button. Why?
    – SubmarineX
    Apr 19, 2014 at 8:53
  • 4
    This does not work, when a button is pressed, the parameters are null Jan 6, 2015 at 12:21
41

In the converter of the chosen solution, you should add values.Clone() otherwise the parameters in the command end null

public class YourConverter : IMultiValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object[] values, ...)
    {
        return values.Clone();
    }

    ...
}
2
  • 7
    Hi, this addition with Clone() makes it work :) Can you please explain, what difference it does. Becuase I dont understand why it needs that Clone() to work? Thank you. Jan 6, 2015 at 13:14
  • 1
    I might be wrong, but this (line 1267) looks like it could be the reason to me: referencesource.microsoft.com/#PresentationFramework/src/…
    – maxp
    Dec 3, 2018 at 16:31
15

Use Tuple in Converter, and in OnExecute, cast the parameter object back to Tuple.

public class YourConverter : IMultiValueConverter 
{      
    public object Convert(object[] values, ...)     
    {   
        Tuple<string, string> tuple = new Tuple<string, string>(
            (string)values[0], (string)values[1]);
        return (object)tuple;
    }      
} 

// ...

public void OnExecute(object parameter) 
{
    var param = (Tuple<string, string>) parameter;
}
12

If your values are constant, you can use x:Array:

<Button Command="{Binding MyCommand}">10
  <Button.CommandParameter>
    <x:Array Type="system:Object">
       <system:String>Y</system:String>
       <system:Double>10</system:Double>
    </x:Array>
  </Button.CommandParameter>
</Button>
3
  • "If your values are static": What is a static resource? For example the question mentions Canvas Width and Height. These values are not constant, but are they static? What would be the XAML in this case?
    – mins
    Jun 2, 2019 at 18:12
  • 3
    I should have written "constant" instead of "static". A static resource is a resource that don't change during the execution. If you use SystemColors for example, you should use DynamicResource instead of StaticResource because the user can change the system colors via Control Panel during the execution. Canvas Width and Height are not resources and are not static. There are instance properties inherited from FrameworkElement.
    – Maxence
    Jun 5, 2019 at 17:12
  • I was programming Tic Tac Toe game in WPF and I needed exactly this for saving the board state. Thx!
    – KUTlime
    Mar 6 at 8:37
7

About using Tuple in Converter, it would be better to use 'object' instead of 'string', so that it works for all types of objects without limitation of 'string' object.

public class YourConverter : IMultiValueConverter 
{      
    public object Convert(object[] values, ...)     
    {   
        Tuple<object, object> tuple = new Tuple<object, object>(values[0], values[1]);
        return tuple;
    }      
} 

Then execution logic in Command could be like this

public void OnExecute(object parameter) 
{
    var param = (Tuple<object, object>) parameter;

    // e.g. for two TextBox object
    var txtZip = (System.Windows.Controls.TextBox)param.Item1;
    var txtCity = (System.Windows.Controls.TextBox)param.Item2;
}

and multi-bind with converter to create the parameters (with two TextBox objects)

<Button Content="Zip/City paste" Command="{Binding PasteClick}" >
    <Button.CommandParameter>
        <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource YourConvert}">
            <Binding ElementName="txtZip"/>
            <Binding ElementName="txtCity"/>
        </MultiBinding>
    </Button.CommandParameter>
</Button>
1
  • 1
    I like this one since it is more clear how many parameters the converter supports. Good for just two parameters! (Plus you showed XAML and Command execute function for full coverage)
    – Caleb W.
    Jan 31, 2020 at 16:25
0

This task can also be solved with a different approach. Instead of programming a converter and enlarging the code in the XAML, you can also aggregate the various parameters in the ViewModel. As a result, the ViewModel then has one more property that contains all parameters.

An example of my current application, which also let me deal with the topic. A generic RelayCommand is required: https://stackoverflow.com/a/22286816/7678085

The ViewModelBase is extended here by a command SaveAndClose. The generic type is a named tuple that represents the various parameters.

public ICommand SaveAndCloseCommand => saveAndCloseCommand ??= new RelayCommand<(IBaseModel Item, Window Window)>
    (execute =>
    {
        execute.Item.Save();
        execute.Window?.Close(); // if NULL it isn't closed.
    },
    canExecute =>
    {
        return canExecute.Item?.IsItemValide ?? false;
    });
private ICommand saveAndCloseCommand;

Then it contains a property according to the generic type:

public (IBaseModel Item, Window Window) SaveAndCloseParameter 
{ 
    get => saveAndCloseParameter ; 
    set 
    {
        SetProperty(ref saveAndCloseParameter, value);
    }
}
private (IBaseModel Item, Window Window) saveAndCloseParameter;

The XAML code of the view then looks like this: (Pay attention to the classic click event)

<Button 
    Command="{Binding SaveAndCloseCommand}" 
    CommandParameter="{Binding SaveAndCloseParameter}" 
    Click="ButtonApply_Click" 
    Content="Apply"
    Height="25" Width="100" />
<Button 
    Command="{Binding SaveAndCloseCommand}" 
    CommandParameter="{Binding SaveAndCloseParameter}" 
    Click="ButtonSave_Click" 
    Content="Save"
    Height="25" Width="100" />

and in the code behind of the view, then evaluating the click events, which then set the parameter property.

private void ButtonApply_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    computerViewModel.SaveAndCloseParameter = (computerViewModel.Computer, null);
}

private void ButtonSave_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    computerViewModel.SaveAndCloseParameter = (computerViewModel.Computer, this);
}

Personally, I think that using the click events is not a break with the MVVM pattern. The program flow control is still located in the area of ​​the ViewModel.

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