27

I am using Django 1.4 and I want to set validation rules that compare values of different inlines.

I have three simple classes

In models.py:

class Shopping(models.Model):
    shop_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)

class Item(models.Model):
    item_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    cost = models.IntegerField()
    item_shop = models.ForeignKey(Shopping)

class Buyer(models.Model):
    buyer_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    amount = models.IntegerField()
    buyer_shop = models.ForeignKey(Shopping)

In admin.py:

class ItemInline(admin.TabularInline):
    model = Item

class BuyerInline(admin.TabularInline):
    model = Buyer

class ShoppingAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    inlines = (ItemInline, BuyerInline)

So for example it is possible to buy a bottle of rhum at 10$ and one of vodka at 8$. Mike pays 15$ and Tom pays 3$.

The goal is to prevent the user from saving an instance with sums that don't match: what has been paid must be the same as the sum of the item costs (ie 10+8 = 15+3).

I tried:

  • raising ValidationError in the Shopping.clean method. But the inlines aren't updated yet in clean so the sums are not correct
  • raising ValidationError in the ShoppingAdmin.save_related method. But raising ValidationError here gives a very user unfriendly error page instead of redirecting to the change page with a nice error message.

Is there any solution to this problem? Is client-side (javascript/ajax) validation the most simple?

2
  • hello, have you come up with something for this? I face the exact same problem. The only solution I can think of is the inline model's clean method, but this would produce a big db overhead.
    – ppetrid
    Commented Dec 20, 2012 at 23:31
  • I guess one solution is to edit django admin's behavior. Look at django/contrib/admin/options.py, the add_view method line 924
    – Rems
    Commented Dec 22, 2012 at 10:32

2 Answers 2

52

You could override your Inline formset to achieve what you want. In the clean method of the formset you have access to your Shopping instance through the 'instance' member. Therefore you could use the Shopping model to store the calculated total temporarily and make your formsets communicate. In models.py:

class Shopping(models.Model):
   shop_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)

   def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
       super(Shopping, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
       self.__total__ = None

in admin.py:

from django.forms.models import BaseInlineFormSet
class ItemInlineFormSet(BaseInlineFormSet):
   def clean(self):
      super(ItemInlineFormSet, self).clean()
      total = 0
      for form in self.forms:
         if not form.is_valid():
            return #other errors exist, so don't bother
         if form.cleaned_data and not form.cleaned_data.get('DELETE'):
            total += form.cleaned_data['cost']
      self.instance.__total__ = total


class BuyerInlineFormSet(BaseInlineFormSet):
   def clean(self):
      super(BuyerInlineFormSet, self).clean()
      total = 0
      for form in self.forms:
         if not form.is_valid():
            return #other errors exist, so don't bother
         if form.cleaned_data and not form.cleaned_data.get('DELETE'):
            total += form.cleaned_data['cost']

      #compare only if Item inline forms were clean as well
      if self.instance.__total__ is not None and self.instance.__total__ != total:
         raise ValidationError('Oops!')

class ItemInline(admin.TabularInline):
   model = Item
   formset = ItemInlineFormSet

class BuyerInline(admin.TabularInline):
   model = Buyer
   formset = BuyerInlineFormSet

This is the only clean way you can do it (to the best of my knowledge) and everything is placed where it should be.

EDIT: Added the *if form.cleaned_data* check since forms contain empty inlines as well. Please let me know how this works for you!

EDIT2: Added the check for forms about to be deleted, as correctly pointed out in the comments. These forms should not participate in the calculations.

5
  • Awesome! It's a shame I can't vote your answer up; I don't have enough reputation. Edit: NVM some reputation points magically appeared
    – Rems
    Commented Dec 25, 2012 at 22:15
  • 2
    It should disregard deleted rows with: if form.cleaned_data.get('DELETE'): continue Commented Apr 3, 2014 at 12:24
  • 1
    This is a lovely strategy, thanks. I have a problem, though, because when there are no inlines added, the error messages don't occur. In my code, I have only one inline formset defined because I am comparing it to a field in the main model (so in the example above, in BuyerInlineFormSet, I would use the comparison if self.instance.amount != total: raise .... When I save the Shopping instance with an amount > 0 and without adding any Buyers, it tells me the form is valid, even though it is not (because the sum of no Buyer amounts is 0).
    – jenniwren
    Commented Oct 19, 2015 at 23:04
  • 1
    This is awesome. Thank you, I thought this wasn't possible after looking everywhere else. However, it's worth noting that this will only work as long as the ItemInline appears before the BuyerInline in the inlines list of the ShoppingAdmin, i.e. the clean() method of the Inline that appears first will run first, and this relies on this behaviour. Commented Apr 14, 2016 at 17:24
  • 2
    Great answer! Filtering out all the marked-for-deletion forms with form.cleaned_data.get('DELETE') is just awesome!
    – Ron
    Commented Nov 30, 2020 at 11:38
-3

Alright I have a solution. It involves editing django admin's code.

In django/contrib/admin/options.py, in the add_view (line 924) and change_view (line 1012) methods, spot this part:

        [...]
        if all_valid(formsets) and form_validated:
            self.save_model(request, new_object, form, True)
        [...]

and replace it with

        if not hasattr(self, 'clean_formsets') or self.clean_formsets(form, formsets):
            if all_valid(formsets) and form_validated:
                self.save_model(request, new_object, form, True)

Now in your ModelAdmin, you can do something like this

class ShoppingAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    inlines = (ItemInline, BuyerInline)
    def clean_formsets(self, form, formsets):
        items_total = 0
        buyers_total = 0
        for formset in formsets:
            if formset.is_valid():
                if issubclass(formset.model, Item):
                    items_total += formset.cleaned_data[0]['cost']
                if issubclass(formset.model, Buyer):
                    buyers_total += formset.cleaned_data[0]['amount']

        if items_total != buyers_total:
            # This is the most ugly part :(
            if not form._errors.has_key(forms.forms.NON_FIELD_ERRORS):
                form._errors[forms.forms.NON_FIELD_ERRORS] = []
            form._errors[forms.forms.NON_FIELD_ERRORS].append('The totals don\'t match!')
            return False
        return True

This is more a hack than a proper solution though. Any improvement suggestions? Does anyone think this should be a feature request on django?

4
  • It's more of a hack indeed since we have to manually append the errors in the list rather than raising a ValidationError. But it still works though! I think this is basically a matter of formset validation. In that sense maybe one could create a custom FormSet class, implement a proper clean method and use that class instead of the default formset in the inline. Just a thought..
    – ppetrid
    Commented Dec 23, 2012 at 2:03
  • Do you suggest manually creating ONE FormSet? So basically there is no more inline, you have to handle the save related by hand, there is no "add another button", etc... You just loose all the power of the inlines :(
    – Rems
    Commented Dec 23, 2012 at 10:57
  • Sorry, maybe I was not clear, I suggest overriding the inline formsets. I ended up posting a separate answer since I came up with a solution for a project of my own.
    – ppetrid
    Commented Dec 25, 2012 at 13:43
  • 1
    Changing Django code is hardly a solution: you are now bound to that specific version and remember to apply these changes any time you'll decide to upgrade. That's like forking Django project...
    – Don
    Commented Sep 22, 2017 at 10:41

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