516

I want to get all the error messages out of the modelState without knowing the key values. Looping through to grab all the error messages that the ModelState contains.

How can I do this?

5
  • 6
    If you're just displaying the errors, then @Html.ValidationSummary() is a quick way to display them all in razor.
    – levininja
    Jan 20, 2014 at 20:23
  • 14
    foreach (var error in ViewData.ModelState.Values.SelectMany(modelState => modelState.Errors)) { DoSomething(error); } Oct 17, 2014 at 13:41
  • Thanks everyone for pointing me in the right direction. Like @viggity said, Keys are important and this did it for me: ModelState.Where(e=>e.Value.Errors.Count > 0).ToList() Nov 12, 2020 at 18:10
  • A side note: If you debug just ModelState variable, you can see some interesting information.
    – carloswm85
    Mar 3 at 14:04
  • answer for a similar question stackoverflow.com/a/68022337/6741585
    – Ali
    May 6 at 15:03

20 Answers 20

619

Using LINQ:

IEnumerable<ModelError> allErrors = ModelState.Values.SelectMany(v => v.Errors);
13
  • 96
    Modified to return IEnumerable<string> with just the error message:: var allErrors = ModelState.Values.SelectMany(v => v.Errors.Select(b => b.ErrorMessage));
    – Kieran
    Feb 19, 2014 at 0:30
  • 7
    This is great, but unfortunately Watch/Immediate windows don't support lambda's :(
    – AaronLS
    Mar 31, 2014 at 23:02
  • 3
    Yes! I (you, anyone) needs "using System.Linq;" in the top. Otherwise you got the message 'Values does not contain a definition for Select many'. It was missing in my case.
    – Estevez
    Nov 19, 2014 at 15:30
  • 1
    @AaronLS Visual Studio 2015 does.
    – irfandar
    Jun 10, 2016 at 7:39
  • 6
    @hakam-fostok @jb06 you're both right. Typing List<string> errors = new List<string>() instead of var errors = new List<string>() is realy a waste of time, but writing IEnumerable<ModelError> allErrors = ModelState.Values.SelectMany(v => v.Errors);, where the return type is not really clear, is really greater in term of readability. (even if visual studio can give it to you on mouse hover)
    – aprovent
    Jul 18, 2016 at 15:46
581
foreach (ModelState modelState in ViewData.ModelState.Values) {
    foreach (ModelError error in modelState.Errors) {
        DoSomethingWith(error);
    }
}

See also How do I get the collection of Model State Errors in ASP.NET MVC?.

2
  • 27
    Very helpful. Note in some scenarios, such as binding failures and bad requests, there will be ModelState entries with empty string for Value.ErrorMessage and instead a Value.Exception.Message
    – AaronLS
    Sep 16, 2014 at 1:12
  • 8
    Errors are nice but sometimes you want the key of the modelstate too (i.e. the name of the field). you can get that by changing the first line to this: foreach (KeyValuePair<string, ModelState> kvp in htmlHelper.ViewData.ModelState) { and insert this line below it: var modelState = kvp.Value;. You can get the key from kvp.Key
    – viggity
    Apr 11, 2018 at 19:07
218

Building on the LINQ verison, if you want to join all the error messages into one string:

string messages = string.Join("; ", ModelState.Values
                                        .SelectMany(x => x.Errors)
                                        .Select(x => x.ErrorMessage));
9
  • 8
    The other option is to do the following: ModelState.Values.SelectMany(x => x.Errors).Select(x => x.ErrorMessage).JoinString("; "); Feb 15, 2013 at 2:06
  • 3
    @Tod, is IEnumerable.JoinString() your own extension method? See stackoverflow.com/q/4382034/188926
    – Dunc
    Feb 15, 2013 at 9:32
  • 2
    Hey Dunc - yes I suspect I have added that extension method to my code base and have forgotten about it and then thought it was a framework method LOL :( Feb 17, 2013 at 4:55
  • 5
    or ... ModelState.Values.SelectMany(O => O.Errors).Select(O => O.ErrorMessage).Aggregate((U, V) => U + ", " + V)
    – fordareh
    Aug 14, 2013 at 0:35
  • 2
    This works great when you are using web api and returning an IHttpActionResult result. So, you can just do: return BadRequest(messages); Thanks, Dunc!
    – Rich Ward
    Aug 24, 2016 at 15:21
38

I was able to do this using a little LINQ,

public static List<string> GetErrorListFromModelState
                                              (ModelStateDictionary modelState)
{
      var query = from state in modelState.Values
                  from error in state.Errors
                  select error.ErrorMessage;

      var errorList = query.ToList();
      return errorList;
}

The above method returns a list of validation errors.

Further Reading :

How to read all errors from ModelState in ASP.NET MVC

0
19

During debugging I find it useful to put a table at the bottom of each of my pages to show all ModelState errors.

<table class="model-state">
    @foreach (var item in ViewContext.ViewData.ModelState) 
    {
        if (item.Value.Errors.Any())
        { 
        <tr>
            <td><b>@item.Key</b></td>
            <td>@((item.Value == null || item.Value.Value == null) ? "<null>" : item.Value.Value.RawValue)</td>
            <td>@(string.Join("; ", item.Value.Errors.Select(x => x.ErrorMessage)))</td>
        </tr>
        }
    }
</table>

<style>
    table.model-state
    {
        border-color: #600;
        border-width: 0 0 1px 1px;
        border-style: solid;
        border-collapse: collapse;
        font-size: .8em;
        font-family: arial;
    }

    table.model-state td
    {
        border-color: #600;
        border-width: 1px 1px 0 0;
        border-style: solid;
        margin: 0;
        padding: .25em .75em;
        background-color: #FFC;
    }
 </style>
1
  • 1
    if there's any edge cases here where this fails please just edit the answer to fix it Dec 15, 2012 at 2:42
16

As I discovered having followed the advice in the answers given so far, you can get exceptions occuring without error messages being set, so to catch all problems you really need to get both the ErrorMessage and the Exception.

String messages = String.Join(Environment.NewLine, ModelState.Values.SelectMany(v => v.Errors)
                                                           .Select( v => v.ErrorMessage + " " + v.Exception));

or as an extension method

public static IEnumerable<String> GetErrors(this ModelStateDictionary modelState)
{
      return modelState.Values.SelectMany(v => v.Errors)
                              .Select( v => v.ErrorMessage + " " + v.Exception).ToList();

}
3
  • why would you want a string with all the errors in it? doesn't make sense when you want to do something with it in the view, an array of list is way better imho Oct 22, 2013 at 8:07
  • 1
    To debug. My first problem was to find out what was going wrong with my app. I wasn't trying to tell the user just find out what was going wrong. Besides it's trivial to convert that example from creating an enumeration of strings to an enumeration of something else, e.g. error message and exception so the really useful thing is knowing that you need both bits of information Oct 22, 2013 at 17:40
  • BTW you did realise the second extension method returns IEnumerable<String> and not just a big single string? Oct 22, 2013 at 17:52
11

In case anyone wants to return the Name of the Model property for binding the error message in a strongly typed view.

List<ErrorResult> Errors = new List<ErrorResult>();
foreach (KeyValuePair<string, ModelState> modelStateDD in ViewData.ModelState)
{
    string key = modelStateDD.Key;
    ModelState modelState = modelStateDD.Value;

    foreach (ModelError error in modelState.Errors)
    {
        ErrorResult er = new ErrorResult();
        er.ErrorMessage = error.ErrorMessage;
        er.Field = key;
        Errors.Add(er);
    }
}

This way you can actually tie the error in with the field that threw the error.

7

Outputting just the Error messages themselves wasn't sufficient for me, but this did the trick.

var modelQuery = (from kvp in ModelState
                  let field = kvp.Key
                  let state = kvp.Value
                  where state.Errors.Count > 0
                  let val = state.Value?.AttemptedValue ?? "[NULL]"

                  let errors = string.Join(";", state.Errors.Select(err => err.ErrorMessage))
                  select string.Format("{0}:[{1}] (ERRORS: {2})", field, val, errors));

Trace.WriteLine(string.Join(Environment.NewLine, modelQuery));
1
  • 1
    As a warning, the key value pairs in ModelState may include NULL values, which is why the original code here included some cute C# 6 business with a null-coalesce operator (?.), hence the currying to the ?? at the end of the expression. The original expression which should protect from null errors was: state.Value.?AttemptedValue ?? "[NULL]". As far as I know, the code in its current state, without the sneaky handling of cases where state.Value == null, is at risk. Mar 9, 2017 at 21:50
6

For just in case someone need it i made and use the following static class in my projects

Usage example:

if (!ModelState.IsValid)
{
    var errors = ModelState.GetModelErrors();
    return Json(new { errors });
}

Usings:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using WebGrease.Css.Extensions;

Class:

public static class ModelStateErrorHandler
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns a Key/Value pair with all the errors in the model
    /// according to the data annotation properties.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="errDictionary"></param>
    /// <returns>
    /// Key: Name of the property
    /// Value: The error message returned from data annotation
    /// </returns>
    public static Dictionary<string, string> GetModelErrors(this ModelStateDictionary errDictionary)
    {
        var errors = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        errDictionary.Where(k => k.Value.Errors.Count > 0).ForEach(i =>
        {
            var er = string.Join(", ", i.Value.Errors.Select(e => e.ErrorMessage).ToArray());
            errors.Add(i.Key, er);
        });
        return errors;
    }

    public static string StringifyModelErrors(this ModelStateDictionary errDictionary)
    {
        var errorsBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        var errors = errDictionary.GetModelErrors();
        errors.ForEach(key => errorsBuilder.AppendFormat("{0}: {1} -", key.Key,key.Value));
        return errorsBuilder.ToString();
    }
}
1
  • Thanks CodeArtist !! I made a small change in the code below its implementation . Jun 22, 2015 at 2:20
4

And this works too:

var query = from state in ModelState.Values
    from error in state.Errors
    select error.ErrorMessage;
var errors = query.ToArray(); // ToList() and so on...
3
  • @Yasser Have you seen Toto's answer? Mar 19, 2014 at 3:08
  • @TheMuffinMan yes I have. What about it ? Mar 19, 2014 at 6:30
  • 1
    @Yasser It's the best answer. Nothing wrong with this one, but no point in using it when SelectMany is available. Mar 19, 2014 at 14:44
4

Useful for passing array of error messages to View, perhaps via Json:

messageArray = this.ViewData.ModelState.Values.SelectMany(modelState => modelState.Errors, (modelState, error) => error.ErrorMessage).ToArray();
4

This is expanding upon the answer from @Dunc . See xml doc comments

// ReSharper disable CheckNamespace
using System.Linq;
using System.Web.Mvc;


public static class Debugg
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This class is for debugging ModelState errors either in the quick watch 
    /// window or the immediate window.
    /// When the model state contains dozens and dozens of properties, 
    /// it is impossible to inspect why a model state is invalid.
    /// This method will pull up the errors
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="modelState">modelState</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static ModelError[]  It(ModelStateDictionary modelState)
    {
        var errors = modelState.Values.SelectMany(x => x.Errors).ToArray();
        return errors;            
    }
}
4

Anybody looking for asp.net core 3.1. Slightly updated than the above answer. I found that this is what [ApiController] returns

 Dictionary<string, List<string>> errors = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();

                foreach (KeyValuePair<string, ModelStateEntry> kvp in ViewData.ModelState)
                {
                    string key = kvp.Key;
                    ModelStateEntry entry = kvp.Value;

                    if (entry.Errors.Count > 0)
                    {
                        List<string> errorList = new List<string>();
                        foreach (ModelError error in entry.Errors)
                        {
                            errorList.Add(error.ErrorMessage);
                        }

                        errors[key] = errorList;
                    }
                }

                return  new JsonResult(new {Errors = errors});
4

This code snippet is useful too and give you a List that contains of Error Messges.

var errors = ModelState.Values.SelectMany(x => x.Errors.Select(c => c.ErrorMessage)).ToList();

3

In addition, ModelState.Values.ErrorMessage may be empty, but ModelState.Values.Exception.Message may indicate an error.

3

<div class="text-danger" style="direction:rtl" asp-validation-summary="All"></div>

simply use asp-validation-summary Tag Helper

2

For AJAX Request better solution:

    public IActionResult Demo(DemoInfo formData)
    {
        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            IEnumerable<object> formErrors = ModelState.Select((s) => new { 
                fieldName = s.Key, 
                fieldValue = s.Value.RawValue,
                fieldMessage = s.Value.Errors.FirstOrDefault()?.ErrorMessage
            });
            return Json(new { formValid = 0, formErrors });
        }
        return Json(new { formValid = 1 });
    }

Response format will be:

{"formValid":0,
 "formErrors":[{
     "fieldName":"name of field from object",
     "fieldValue":"value from browser",
     "fieldMessage":null /*Error message from model annotations if field is valid the value will be null */
 }]
}

For more details about Func<> check this page : Func<TSource,Int32,TResult>)

0
var x = new Dictionary<string,string>();
for (var b = 0; b < ViewData.ModelState.Values.Count(); b++)
{
    if (ViewData.ModelState.Values.ElementAt(b).Errors.Count() > 0)
        x.Add(ViewData.ModelState.Keys.ElementAt(b), String.Join(",", ViewData
            .ModelState.Values.ElementAt(b).Errors.Select(c => c.ErrorMessage)));
}
1
  • @GuilhermeSilva is a contributor Jun 29, 2020 at 17:38
-1

In your implementation you are missing static Class, this should be.

if (!ModelState.IsValid)
{
    var errors =  ModelStateErrorHandler.GetModelErrors(this.ModelState);
    return Json(new { errors });
}

rather

if (!ModelState.IsValid)
{
    var errors = ModelState.GetModelErrors();
    return Json(new { errors });
}
-1

var result = string.Join(',',ModelState.Values.SelectMany(v => v.Errors).Select(a=>a.ErrorMessage));

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