179

I have code something like this:

<?
    $a="localhost";
    function body(){
        global $a;
        echo $a;
    }

    function head(){
        global $a;
        echo $a;
    }

    function footer(){
        global $a;
        echo $a;
    }
?>

is there any way to define the global variable in one place and make the variable $a accessible in all the functions at once? without making use of global $a; more?

2
  • 15
    No there isn't. If you don't like the global keyword, consider using the $GLOBALS['a'] superglobal in all scopes, or consider passing the parameter to your functions. – Michael Berkowski Nov 23 '12 at 13:54
  • 5
    If it's something important then even a session var can be used. – Nikos Tsirakis Nov 23 '12 at 14:03

10 Answers 10

273

The $GLOBALS array can be used instead:

$GLOBALS['a'] = 'localhost';

function body(){

    echo $GLOBALS['a'];
}

From the Manual:

An associative array containing references to all variables which are currently defined in the global scope of the script. The variable names are the keys of the array.


If you have a set of functions that need some common variables, a class with properties may be a good choice instead of a global:

class MyTest
{
    protected $a;

    public function __construct($a)
    {
        $this->a = $a;
    }

    public function head()
    {
        echo $this->a;
    }

    public function footer()
    {
        echo $this->a;
    }
}

$a = 'localhost';
$obj = new MyTest($a);
0
80

If the variable is not going to change you could use define

Example:

define('FOOTER_CONTENT', 'Hello I\'m an awesome footer!');

function footer()
{
    echo FOOTER_CONTENT;
}
6
  • 2
    What happens when FOOTER_CONTENT is attempted to modify? Is it just like final in Java or const in C, C++ and C#? – Lion Nov 23 '12 at 14:05
  • 5
    If you try to define FOOTER_CONTENT a second time, php will throw a notice about it – Dale Nov 23 '12 at 14:06
  • I needed to calculate the current unix epoch time each time a page is loaded, then use that value in a couple calculations (functions). "define" worked for me. Initially, I didn't see that "echo FOOTER_CONTENT;" didn't have a preceding '$' and I got errors. – user208145 Jun 7 '16 at 2:28
  • 1
    If variable is not going to change its not a variable. Isn't it?! – Sajidur Rahman Mar 28 '18 at 17:11
  • Maybe in 2012, this was an acceptable answer, but using a define() for the content of the footer is not a good practice in today's php. – istepaniuk Jan 21 at 18:05
31

Add your variables in $GLOBALS super global array like

$GLOBALS['variable'] = 'localhost'; 

and use it globally

or you can use constant which are accessible throughout the script

define('HOSTNAME', 'localhost');  
3
  • 3
    If you use 'define',once set, you can't change a define! – Reza M.A Feb 24 '14 at 5:58
  • in your first example, it is saying that the '$variable is now called 'localhost' later in the script? – Zach Smith Oct 22 '15 at 14:25
  • no if you want to use this variable you have to use it like $GLOBALS['variable']; – Pankaj Khairnar Oct 24 '15 at 3:35
29

If a variable is declared outside of a function its already in global scope. So there is no need to declare. But from where you calling this variable must have access to this variable. If you are calling from inside a function you have to use global keyword:

$variable = 5;

function name()
{
    global $variable;

    $value = $variable + 5;

    return $value;  

}

Using global keyword outside a function is not an error. If you want to include this file inside a function you can declare the variable as global.

config.php

global $variable;

$variable = 5;

other.php

function name()
{
    require_once __DIR__ . '/config.php';
}

You can use $GLOBALS as well. It's a superglobal so it has access everywhere.

$GLOBALS['variable'] = 5;

function name()
{
    echo $GLOBALS['variable'];
}

Depending on your choice you can choose either.

0
9

This answer is very late but what I do is set a class that holds Booleans, arrays, and integer-initial values as global scope static variables. Any constant strings are defined as such.

define("myconstant", "value"); 

class globalVars {

    static $a = false;

    static $b = 0;

    static $c = array('first' => 2, 'second' => 5);

}


function test($num) {

    if (!globalVars::$a) {

        $returnVal = 'The ' . myconstant . ' of ' . $num . ' plus ' . globalVars::$b . ' plus ' . globalVars::$c['second'] . ' is ' . ($num + globalVars::$b + globalVars::$c['second']) . '.';

        globalVars::$a = true;

    } else {

        $returnVal = 'I forgot';

    }

    return $returnVal;

}

echo test(9); ---> The value of 9 + 0 + 5 is 14.

echo "<br>";

echo globalVars::$a; ----> 1

The static keywords must be present in the class else the vars $a, $b, and $c will not be globally scoped.

1
  • This is a good solution for many reasons. Class static requires just a few characters added to the basic variable name: G::$Name, where the declaration looks like this: class G { static $Name, $Name2;} Note that G can be truly global variables, then E could be used for variables relating to Employees. This is easier to program with than the full-scale object-oriented paradigm supported by PHP. If constants are truly needed, you can declare them after "const" just like the variables declared after "static"--just leave out the dollar signs. G::Example would be an example of a global constant. – David Spector Nov 22 '18 at 1:26
6

You can try the keyword use in Closure functions or Lambdas if this fits your intention... PHP 7.0 though. Not that's its better, but just an alternative.

$foo = "New";
$closure = (function($bar) use ($foo) {
    echo "$foo $bar";
})("York");

demo | info

5

You answered this in the way you wrote the question - use 'define'. but once set, you can't change a define.

Alternatively, there are tricks with a constant in a class, such as class::constant that you can use. You can also make them variable by declaring static properties to the class, with functions to set the static property if you want to change it.

0
2

Let's think a little different, You can use static parameters:

class global {
    static $foo = "bar";
}

And you can use and modify it every where you like, like:

function func() {
    echo global::$foo;
}
1
  • 1
    This is somewhat elegant. – Georgy Ivanov Dec 8 '20 at 11:12
0

What if you make use of procedural function instead of variable and call them any where as you.

I usually make a collection of configuration values and put them inside a function with return statement. I just include that where I need to make use of global value and call particular function.

function host()
{
   return "localhost";
}
-2

$GLOBALS[] is the right solution, but since we're talking about alternatives, a function can also do this job easily:

function capital() {
    return my_var() . ' is the capital of Italy';
}

function my_var() {
    return 'Rome';
}
3
  • 1
    Here the function is not A global variable. – Pratik Soni Jul 21 '20 at 15:25
  • @PratikSoni I never said it was a global variable. Next time read better, that way you won't spread negative ratings everywhere. – Dario Ferrer Jul 22 '20 at 19:15
  • I am sorry if you think this ie misleading. But i was going in context of actual question. And the answer is not even little bit near by to the question. "How to declare a global variable in php?" – Pratik Soni Jul 24 '20 at 14:26

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