18

I have an acceptance test case, the result is plain text. I want to use Jenkins to show the result, and the JUnit format is suitable for me.

So I want to check whether there is existing python code to generate JUnit-format XML, so that I can easily just add my parsing code.

Related question.

19

Corey above suggested junitxml, but I was in the same boat as larrycai in that I'm not writing unit tests to test Python code. I'm writing Python scripts to do black box system testing and just wanted to output results in JUnit XML without reinventing the wheel.

I briefly looked at David Black's "python junit xml output module" suggested by larrycai above, but ended up going with another similar package. Not sure which is better since I only tried this one, but it ended up working quite nicely for me.

Only different by one character, but the package is "junit-xml": https://pypi.python.org/pypi/junit-xml/1.0

Beware...the examples in his readme have errors and do not work. I reported the errors on github (github link included on the pypi page). There is also a bug with his "prettyprint" arg handling, but I'll refer you to issue #3 that I also reported on github, in which I included my fix. If you download the source you can look at his test.py unit tests, but here is also my test script where I tested/experimented with several examples (using Python 3.3):

#junit-xml 1.0 downloaded from https://pypi.python.org/pypi/junit-xml
from junit_xml import TestSuite, TestCase

#Good article that has examples of how Jenkins parses JUnit XML to display output:
#http://nelsonwells.net/2012/09/how-jenkins-ci-parses-and-displays-junit-output/

#One version of JUnit XML schema: http://windyroad.org/dl/Open%20Source/JUnit.xsd


def testBasicToConsole():
    ''' Perform the very basic test with 1 suite and 1 test case, output to console.
        This is the example from the above referenced pypi webpage, but corrected to
        actually work.
    '''

    test_cases = [TestCase('Test1', 'some.class.name', 123.345, 'I am stdout!', 'I am stderr!')]
    ts = [TestSuite("my test suite", test_cases)]
    # pretty printing is on by default but can be disabled using prettyprint=False
    print(TestSuite.to_xml_string(ts, prettyprint=False))


def testBasicInfoToConsole():
    ''' Actually, even more basic than the test above, with classname, stdout, and stderror
        removed to demonstrate they are optional.  For system testing we often won't use them.
        Output to console.
    '''

    test_cases = [TestCase('PathCheck: ApplicationControl', '', .0523, '', '')]
    ts = [TestSuite("DirectorITG2", test_cases)]
    # pretty printing is on by default but can be disabled using prettyprint=False
    print(TestSuite.to_xml_string(ts))

def testFailureInfoToConsole():
    ''' 1 suite and test case with failure info added. Output to console.
    '''

    test_cases = TestCase('FileCheck: DesktopNotificationCenter', '', .0451, '', '')
    test_cases.add_failure_info('Invalid File \'DNC.exe\'.')
    ts = [TestSuite("DirectorITG2", [test_cases])]
    # pretty printing is on by default but can be disabled using prettyprint=False
    print(TestSuite.to_xml_string(ts))

def testMultiTestCasesToConsole():
    ''' Demonstrates a single test suite with multiple test cases, one of which
        has failure info. Output to console.
    '''

    test_cases = [TestCase('FileCheck: DesktopNotificationCenter', '', .0451, '', '')]
    test_cases.append(TestCase('FileCheck: PropertyServer', '', .0452, '', ''))
    test_cases[0].add_failure_info('Invalid File \'DNC.exe\'.')
    ts = [TestSuite("DirectorITG2", test_cases)]
    # pretty printing is on by default but can be disabled using prettyprint=False
    print(TestSuite.to_xml_string(ts))

def testMultiTestSuitesToConsole():
    ''' Demonstrates adding multiple test suites. Output to console.
    '''

    test_cases = [TestCase('FileCheck: DesktopNotificationCenter', '', .0451, '', '')]
    ts = [TestSuite("FileChecks", test_cases)]
    ts.append(TestSuite("ProcessChecks", [TestCase('ProcessCheck: ApplicationControl', '', 1.043, '', '')]))
    # pretty printing is on by default but can be disabled using prettyprint=False
    print(TestSuite.to_xml_string(ts))

def testMultiTestCasesToFile():
    ''' Demonstrates a single test suite with multiple test cases, one of which
        has failure info. Output to a file with PrettyPrint disabled (Jenkins-friendly).
    '''

    test_cases = [TestCase('DesktopNotificationCenter', 'Integration.FileCheck', .0451, '', '')]
    test_cases.append(TestCase('PropertyServer', 'Integration.FileCheck', .5678, '', ''))
    test_cases[0].add_failure_info('Invalid File \'DNC.exe\'.')
    ts = [TestSuite("GII_2013_R1", test_cases)]
    # open the file, then call the TestSuite to_File function with prettyprint off.
    # use raw text here to protect slashes from becoming escape characters
    with open(r'C:\Users\Administrator\.jenkins\workspace\IntegrationTests\FileCheck.xml', mode='a') as lFile:
        TestSuite.to_file(lFile, ts, prettyprint=False)
        lFile.close()


if __name__ == '__main__':
    ''' If this module is being run directly, run all of the example test functions.
        Test functions output JUnit XML for various scenarios to either screen (Console)
        or file.

    '''
    testBasicToConsole()
#    testBasicInfoToConsole()
#    testFailureInfoToConsole()
#    testMultiTestCasesToConsole()
#    testMultiTestSuitesToConsole()
#    testMultiTestCasesToFile()

else:
    ''' Function calls for an external run of this script.

    '''
    testMultiTestCasesToFile()
1
  • Thank you for giving an example of the add_failure_info method, which is oddly lacking from the official "docs." – MarkHu Sep 3 '15 at 5:58
7

you can use junitxml (Python JUnit XML reporter)

on PyPI: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/junitxml

if you had a standard unittest test suite called suite. you could run it, and write results to an xml file like this:

import junitxml

fp = file('results.xml', 'wb')
result = junitxml.JUnitXmlResult(fp)
result.startTestRun()
TestSuite(suite).run(result)
result.stopTestRun()

or to discover tests and print xml to stdout:

python -m junitxml.main discover

another option is to use nose and run your suite with:

nosetests --with-xunit
2
  • thanks, but I just want to generate junit xml files from existing testing result, junitxml is mainly for python unit test – Larry Cai Nov 23 '12 at 15:40
  • thx, could be a choice, but so far I just want to transfer the log to junit format – Larry Cai Nov 24 '12 at 6:27
1

The collective.recipe.xmltestreport buildout recipe package does exactly this. It takes test runner output and creates a XML file suitable for JUnit. It is, however, buildout specific and uses the zope.testrunner test runner package.

If switching to buildout is not an option for you, you could study it's source code to extract the important parts.

0

I found one python module https://bitbucket.org/db_atlass/python-junit-xml-output-module/ , looks fit to my need. thx David Black there

# code snippet for the usage
""" a short example of how to use this module """
test_cases = []
for i in range(0, 5):
    type_c = ""
    if i % 2 == 0:
        type_c = "failure"
    test_cases.append(TestCase(i, str(i) + "contents", type_c) )

junit_xml = JunitXml("demo test example", test_cases)
0

Here I got another package from github https://github.com/kyrus/python-junit-xml

0

Good answers here: (there are many ways to do it) Python unittests in Jenkins?

IMHO the best way is write python unittest tests and install pytest (something like 'yum install pytest') to get py.test installed. Then run tests like this: 'py.test --junitxml results.xml test.py'. You can run any unittest python script and get jUnit xml results.

https://docs.python.org/2.7/library/unittest.html

In jenkins build configuration Post-build actions Add a "Publish JUnit test result report" action with result.xml and any more test result files you produce.

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