36

I am looking for a free test smptp server which can save emails in to files for my development tests. Since my development environment is windows I prefer test email server to run on windows but I can consider to install any other linux based alternatives.

closed as not constructive by Kev Apr 1 '13 at 23:27

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35

There are a few:

Or you can also set it up in your web.config to just store the e-mails in the file system (the config way of what "silky" has proposed in code):

<system.net>  
   <mailSettings>  
      <smtp deliveryMethod="SpecifiedPickupDirectory">  
         <specifiedPickupDirectory 
             pickupDirectoryLocation="c:\temp\mails\"/>  
      </smtp>  
   </mailSettings>  
</system.net>  

Marc

  • antix standalone installation was exact solution for my problem. This one is better since I had problem with python debugging server which is not suitable for UTF-8 encoded messages. – Tolga Aug 30 '09 at 14:17
  • The last option worked for me, I further installed an [EML Reader] (emlreader.com) for better viewing. – Ronald Nsabiyera May 20 '15 at 14:15
23

I know that this is an old post however I also know about http://smtp4dev.codeplex.com/ which I would also recommend. It sits on you task bar and then pops up when you send emails to it. It allows you to then examine the email in quite some depth.

12

-- Edit:

This advice only valid if you're using .NET

Check this out. If you set it appropriately, it will just store your emails on disk :)

SmtpClient client = ...;
client.PickupDirectoryLocation = @"c:\foo\emails\"; //"
client.DeliveryMethod = SmtpDeliveryMethod.SpecifiedPickupDirectory;

-- Edit

Just in case some people don't get it, this means you don't need another SMTP server for test/dev, you just set the variable appropriately.

-- Edit

For completeness, as marc_s shows below, you can set this in configs nicely via:

<system.net>  
   <mailSettings>  
      <smtp deliveryMethod="SpecifiedPickupDirectory">  
         <specifiedPickupDirectory 
             pickupDirectoryLocation="c:\foo\emails\" />  
      </smtp>  
   </mailSettings>  
</system.net>
  • That of course assumes that the OP is using C# to write his software. – Martin v. Löwis Aug 30 '09 at 8:50
  • 1
    Yes. You make a fair point Martin, I assumed he was using .NET, but now noticed it's not specified in the original post. My mistake for being in a '.NET' state of mind :) – Noon Silk Aug 30 '09 at 8:52
  • You can configure this without changing any code in the application configuration file: confguration\system.net\mailSettings\smtp element. – Thorarin Aug 30 '09 at 9:12
  • 1
    Thorarin: Yes, 'marc_s' shows how, below. I don't feel right editing his answer into mine though. – Noon Silk Aug 30 '09 at 9:14
5

The Python smtpd module has a DebuggingServer which prints all messages to stdout. If you redirect them to a file, you should be done.

  • I had python already installed so it took few minutes for me to look for an example then implement the debugging server. I have a small problem with displaying UTF-8 encoded emails. When I try sending emails via gmail, there is no problem with the UTF-8 encoded messages, however the smtpd module of python does not print non-ascii characters correctly. Do you have any suggestions on this issue? – Tolga Aug 30 '09 at 9:27
  • In general e-mails need to be encoded using quoted-printable or base64 encoding and transferred only in 7-bit ASCII encoding (look for MIME RFC on Google). While some SMTP server extensions allow sending 8-bit e-mails it is not something you should count on. – Filip Navara Aug 30 '09 at 11:37
  • The official way in Python to process MIME messages is the email package. However, doing that might be overkill - so I rather recommend to write all messages in an mbox file (either by directly appending it, or through the mailbox module), and then open the module in Thunderbird. – Martin v. Löwis Aug 30 '09 at 12:07
5

We used Mailtrap for this. It give you remote smtp server account and direct access to all mails in it. So you just enter given smtp credential in your application and after that all email sent by your system will be visible on mailtrap. And you can easily look source code of mail, and download it to your local system. You can see example here

On mailtrap you can have as many smtp account as you want( different account for different application environments, or different application) Also you can manage access to your account ( so only trusted people will se your emails) and you can forward some emails to real email addresses.

3

Below are the links i found

Use depending on the Language and Platform of your choice.

There is also an earlier post for .NET Testing SMTP with .net

2

Papercut (http://papercut.codeplex.com/discussions) is the simplest and most elegant one so far. Simple exe file that listens to port 25 and displays emails.

  • Please re-read the question: "I am looking for a free test smptp server which can save emails in to files" - Does PaperCut support this? – Kev Apr 1 '13 at 23:30
  • Papercut is a terrible tool, it fails to handle multiple messages at the same time. I'd recommend avoiding it. – Tony Ashworth Jun 17 '14 at 19:18
  • I just tried Papercut now and you can right click on the mail and view the physical file it saved. This is good software in my books. – TheLegendaryCopyCoder Feb 20 '16 at 18:54

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