I'm reading bash examples about if but some examples are written with single square brackets:

if [ -f $param ]
then
  #...
fi

others with double square brackets:

if [[ $? -ne 0 ]]
then
    start looking for errors in yourlog
fi

What is the difference?

up vote 138 down vote accepted

Single [] are posix shell compliant condition tests.

Double [[]] are an extension to the standard [] and are supported by bash and other shells (e.g. zsh, ksh). They support extra operations (as well as the standard posix operations). For example: || instead of -o and regex matching with =~. A fuller list of differences can be found in the bash manual section on conditional constructs.

Use [] whenever you want your script to be portable across shells. Use [[]] if you want conditional expressions not supported by [] and don't need to be portable.

  • 1
    I'd add that if your script doesn't start with a shebang that explicitly requests a shell that supports [[ ]] (e.g. bash with #!/bin/bash or #!/usr/bin/env bash), you should use the portable option. Scripts that assume /bin/sh supports extensions like this will break on OSes like recent Debian and Ubuntu releases where that's not the case. – Gordon Davisson Aug 8 at 21:21

Behavior differences

Tested in Bash 4.3.11:

  • POSIX vs Bash extension:

  • regular command vs magic

    • [ is just a regular command with a weird name.

      ] is just an argument of [ that prevents further arguments from being used.

      Ubuntu 16.04 actually has an executable for it at /usr/bin/[ provided by coreutils, but the bash built-in version takes precedence.

      Nothing is altered in the way that Bash parses the command.

      In particular, < is redirection, && and || concatenate multiple commands, ( ) generates subshells unless escaped by \, and word expansion happens as usual.

    • [[ X ]] is a single construct that makes X be parsed magically. <, &&, || and () are treated specially, and word splitting rules are different.

      There are also further differences like = and =~.

    In Bashese: [ is a built-in command, and [[ is a keyword: https://askubuntu.com/questions/445749/whats-the-difference-between-shell-builtin-and-shell-keyword

  • <

    • [[ a < b ]]: lexicographical comparison
    • [ a \< b ]: Same as above. \ required or else does redirection like for any other command. Bash extension.
    • I could not find a POSIX alternative to this, see: How to test strings for less than or equal?
  • && and ||

    • [[ a = a && b = b ]]: true, logical and
    • [ a = a && b = b ]: syntax error, && parsed as an AND command separator cmd1 && cmd2
    • [ a = a -a b = b ]: equivalent, but deprecated by POSIX
    • [ a = a ] && [ b = b ]: POSIX recommendation
  • (

    • [[ (a = a || a = b) && a = b ]]: false
    • [ ( a = a ) ]: syntax error, () is interpreted as a subshell
    • [ \( a = a -o a = b \) -a a = b ]: equivalent, but () is deprecated by POSIX
    • ([ a = a ] || [ a = b ]) && [ a = b ] POSIX recommendation
  • word splitting

    • x='a b'; [[ $x = 'a b' ]]: true, quotes not needed
    • x='a b'; [ $x = 'a b' ]: syntax error, expands to [ a b = 'a b' ]
    • x='a b'; [ "$x" = 'a b' ]: equivalent
  • =

    • [[ ab = a? ]]: true, because it does pattern matching (* ? [ are magic). Does not glob expand to files in current directory.
    • [ ab = a? ]: a? glob expands. So may be true or false depending on the files in the current directory.
    • [ ab = a\? ]: false, not glob expansion
    • = and == are the same in both [ and [[, but == is a Bash extension.
    • printf 'ab' | grep -Eq 'a.': POSIX ERE equivalent
    • [[ ab =~ 'ab?' ]]: false, loses magic with ''
    • [[ ab? =~ 'ab?' ]]: true
  • =~

    • [[ ab =~ ab? ]]: true, POSIX extended regular expression match, ? does not glob expand
    • [ a =~ a ]: syntax error
    • printf 'ab' | grep -Eq 'ab?': POSIX equivalent

Recommendation

I prefer to always use [].

There are POSIX equivalents for every [[ ]] construct I've seen.

If you use [[ ]] you:

  • lose portability
  • force the reader to learn the intricacies of another bash extension. [ is just a regular command with a weird name, no special semantics are involved.
  • 1
    "There are POSIX equivalents for every [[ ]] construct I've seen." The same thing can be said of any Turing Complete language on the face of the planet. – A. Rick Aug 16 '16 at 10:36
  • 2
    @A.Rick that would be a valid answer to all "How to do X in language Y" SO questions :-) Of course, there is a "conveniently" implicit in that statement. – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心 六四事件 法轮功 Aug 16 '16 at 10:39
  • 4
    Fantastic summary. Thanks for the effort. I however disagree with the recommendation. It's portability versus more consistent and powerful syntax. If you can require bash >4 in your environments then the [[ ]] syntax is recommended. – Alkaline Sep 5 '16 at 13:07
  • @Downvoters please explain so I can learn and improve info :-) – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心 六四事件 法轮功 Jan 12 '17 at 16:34
  • 3
    Great answer but I think the Recommendation: always use [] should be read as My preference: use [] if you don't want to lose portability. As stated here: If portability/conformance to POSIX or the BourneShell is a concern, the old syntax should be used. If on the other hand the script requires BASH, Zsh, or KornShell, the new syntax is usually more flexible, but not necessarily backwards compatible. I'd rather go with [[ ab =~ ab? ]] if I can and have no concern about backward compatibility than printf 'ab' | grep -Eq 'ab?' – archemiro Apr 23 '17 at 15:33

Inside single brackets for condition test (i.e. [ ... ]), some operators such as single = is supported by all shells, whereas use of operator == is not supported by some of the older shells.

Inside double brackets for condition test (i.e. [[ ... ]]), there is no difference between using = or == in old or new shells.

Edit: I should also note that: In bash, always use double brackets [[ ... ]] if possible, because it is safer than single brackets. I'll illustrate why with the following example:

if [ $var == "hello" ]; then

if $var happens to be null / empty, then this is what the script sees:

if [ == "hello" ]; then

which will break your script. The solution is to either use double brackets, or always remember to put quotes around your variables ("$var"). Double brackets is better defensive coding practice.

  • 1
    Putting quotes around all reads of variables unless you have a very good reason not to is a much better defensive coding practice, since it applies to all reads of variables, not just those in conditions. An iTunes installer bug once deleted people's files if the hard drive name contained spaces (or something like that). It also solves the problem you mention. – Chai T. Rex Sep 25 at 21:19

[[ is a bash keyword similar to (but more powerful than) the [ command.

See

http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/031 and http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashGuide/TestsAndConditionals

Unless you're writing for POSIX sh, we recommend [[.

you can use the double square brackets for light regex matching, e.g. :

if [[ $1 =~ "foo.*bar" ]] ; then

(as long as the version of bash you are using supports this syntax)

  • 6
    Except you've quoted the pattern, so it's now treated as a literal string. – ormaaj Nov 24 '12 at 18:05
  • very true. sometimes this annoys me :) – asf107 Nov 27 '12 at 18:36

Bash manual says:

When used with [[, the ‘<’ and ‘>’ operators sort lexicographically using the current locale. The test command uses ASCII ordering.

(The test command is identical to [ ] )

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