48

In C#, how does a try catch finally block work?

So if there is an exception, I know that it will jump to the catch block and then jump to the finally block.

But what if there is no error, the catch block wont get run, but does the finally block get run then?

  • 1
    @MatíasFidemraizer: I'm all for experimentation - but that doesn't necessarily tell you what the language guarantees. There are various things you might "discover" by experimentation which would be bad to rely on. – Jon Skeet Nov 24 '12 at 20:32
  • @JonSkeet I'm speaking in general terms, not about your own suggestion (your link), but I mean that checking how try/catch/finally works in C# is something that you can discover just with this code: try { } catch{ } finally { Trace.WriteLine("I'm here!"); } for example :) – Matías Fidemraizer Nov 24 '12 at 20:34
  • @MatíasFidemraizer: But that's my point - that shows you what it does in this particular case - but it doesn't tell you anything about what happens if (say) you return within the try block. Yes, experimentation is good - but I'd generally prefer to trust a specification where possible. – Jon Skeet Nov 24 '12 at 20:36
  • 2
    @JonSkeet 100% agree. I always prefer to read a documentation page and know how exactly behaves some language or API feature. But I mean that I wouldn't ask a question in a forum or SO without reading the so-called documentation or at least trying myself a sample code. But again, 100% agree, specification > trial-error. – Matías Fidemraizer Nov 24 '12 at 20:39
  • When a return executes control/program glow is returned to the script, function or method that executed the method or function. This means anything after the return inside that called function is not executed. So if you had a return on one line, and say, an exception on the following line, it would not execute the exception. Without returns, the exceptions would trigger, the catch would catch them and if you use a finally block then it would execute whatever is inside it. exit, cleanup, return, whatever you want really, but in practice is best to perform cleanup if needed and not much else. – Chris 2 days ago
45

Yes, the finally block gets run whether there is an exception or not.

Try
    [ tryStatements ]
    [ Exit Try ]
[ Catch [ exception [ As type ] ] [ When expression ]
    [ catchStatements ]
    [ Exit Try ] ]
[ Catch ... ]
[ Finally
    [ finallyStatements ] ] --RUN ALWAYS
End Try

See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fk6t46tz%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

  • 15
    What's the point of a FINALLY block? wouldn't the next line outside of the TRY block just be executed regardless anyway? Why bother with a FINALLY? – Doug Nov 17 '14 at 1:43
  • 5
  • Old post/comments. @Doug - my instance is to log any API call, regardless of errors or not. Hence, finally comes into play, instead of using (2) "log" calls in the try block, and then the catch. – Rob Scott Mar 3 at 22:54
12

Yes the finally clause gets exeucuted if there is no exception. Taking an example

     try
        {
            int a = 10;
            int b = 20;
            int z = a + b;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
        finally
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Executed");
        }

So here if suppose an exception occurs also the finally gets executed.

5

A common usage of catch and finally together is to obtain and use resources in a try block, deal with exceptional circumstances in a catch block, and release the resources in the finally block.

For more information and examples on re-throwing exceptions, see try-catch and Throwing Exceptions. For more information about the finally block, see try-finally.

public class EHClass
{
    void ReadFile(int index)
    {
        // To run this code, substitute a valid path from your local machine 
        string path = @"c:\users\public\test.txt";
        System.IO.StreamReader file = new System.IO.StreamReader(path);
        char[] buffer = new char[10];
        try
        {
            file.ReadBlock(buffer, index, buffer.Length);
        }
        catch (System.IO.IOException e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Error reading from {0}. Message = {1}", path, e.Message);
        }

        finally
        {
            if (file != null)
            {
                file.Close();
            }
        }
        // Do something with buffer...
    }

}
0

finally block always run , no matter what. just try this method

     public int TryCatchFinally(int a, int b)
    {
        try
        {
            int sum = a + b;
            if (a > b)
            {
                throw new Exception();
            }
            else
            {
                int rightreturn = 2;
                return rightreturn;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            int ret = 1;
            return ret;
        }
        finally
        {
            int fin = 5;
        }
    }
0
        try
        {
            //Function to Perform
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
         //You can display what error occured in Try block, with exact technical spec (DivideByZeroException)
            throw; 
            // Displaying error through signal to Machine, 
            //throw is usefull , if you calling a method with try from derived class.. So the method will directly get the signal                
        }

        finally  //Optional
        {
            //Here You can write any code to be executed after error occured in Try block
            Console.WriteLine("Completed");
        }
  • The finally always get's executed, whether the catch catched an error or not. – Mason Sep 25 '17 at 9:59

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