What tricks do people use to manage the available memory of an interactive R session? I use the functions below [based on postings by Petr Pikal and David Hinds to the r-help list in 2004] to list (and/or sort) the largest objects and to occassionally rm() some of them. But by far the most effective solution was ... to run under 64-bit Linux with ample memory.

Any other nice tricks folks want to share? One per post, please.

# improved list of objects
.ls.objects <- function (pos = 1, pattern, order.by,
                        decreasing=FALSE, head=FALSE, n=5) {
    napply <- function(names, fn) sapply(names, function(x)
                                         fn(get(x, pos = pos)))
    names <- ls(pos = pos, pattern = pattern)
    obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1])
    obj.mode <- napply(names, mode)
    obj.type <- ifelse(is.na(obj.class), obj.mode, obj.class)
    obj.size <- napply(names, object.size)
    obj.dim <- t(napply(names, function(x)
                        as.numeric(dim(x))[1:2]))
    vec <- is.na(obj.dim)[, 1] & (obj.type != "function")
    obj.dim[vec, 1] <- napply(names, length)[vec]
    out <- data.frame(obj.type, obj.size, obj.dim)
    names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "Rows", "Columns")
    if (!missing(order.by))
        out <- out[order(out[[order.by]], decreasing=decreasing), ]
    if (head)
        out <- head(out, n)
    out
}
# shorthand
lsos <- function(..., n=10) {
    .ls.objects(..., order.by="Size", decreasing=TRUE, head=TRUE, n=n)
}
  • Note, I do NOT doubt it, but what's the use of that? I am pretty new to memory problems in R, but I am experiencing some lately (that's why I was searching for this post:) – so am I just starting with all this. How does this help my daily work? – Matt Bannert Feb 2 '11 at 9:34
  • 4
    if you want to see the objects within a function, you have to use: lsos(pos = environment()), otherwise it'll only show global variables. To write to standard error: write.table(lsos(pos=environment()), stderr(), quote=FALSE, sep='\t') – Michael Kuhn Apr 5 '11 at 11:56
  • Why 64-bit linux and not 64-bit Windows? Does the choice of OS make a non-trivial difference when I have 32GB of ram to use? – Jase Oct 7 '12 at 10:01
  • 3
    @pepsimax: This has been packaged in the multilevelPSA package. The package is designed for something else, but you can use the function from there without loading the package by saying requireNamespace(multilevelPSA); multilevelPSA::lsos(...). Or in the Dmisc package (not on CRAN). – krlmlr Nov 12 '13 at 10:22
  • 1
    If the data set is of a manageable size, I usually go to R studio>Environment>Grid View. Here you can see and sort all items in your current environment based on the size. – kRazzy R Nov 20 '16 at 3:14

25 Answers 25

Ensure you record your work in a reproducible script. From time-to-time, reopen R, then source() your script. You'll clean out anything you're no longer using, and as an added benefit will have tested your code.

  • 55
    My strategy is to break my scripts up along the lines of load.R and do.R, where load.R may take quite some time to load in data from files or a database, and does any bare minimum pre-processing/merging of that data. The last line of load.R is something to save the workspace state. Then do.R is my scratchpad whereby I build out my analysis functions. I frequently reload do.R (with or without reloading the workspace state from load.R as needed). – Josh Reich Sep 1 '09 at 16:33
  • 29
    That's a good technique. When files are run in a certain order like that, I often prefix them with a number: 1-load.r, 2-explore.r, 3-model.r - that way it's obvious to others that there is some order present. – hadley Sep 4 '09 at 13:02
  • 3
    I can't back this idea up enough. I've taught R to a few people and this is one of first things I say. This also applies to any language where development incorporates a REPL and a file being edited (i.e. Python). rm(ls=list()) and source() works too, but re-opening is better (packages cleared too). – Vince Jun 15 '10 at 5:31
  • 46
    The fact that the top-voted answer involves restarting R is the worst criticism of R possible. – sds Jul 15 '13 at 20:44
  • 6
    @MartínBel that only removes objects created in the global environment. It does not unload packages or S4 objects or many other things. – hadley Dec 19 '13 at 14:09

I use the data.table package. With its := operator you can :

  • Add columns by reference
  • Modify subsets of existing columns by reference, and by group by reference
  • Delete columns by reference

None of these operations copy the (potentially large) data.table at all, not even once.

  • Aggregation is also particularly fast because data.table uses much less working memory.

Related links :

Saw this on a twitter post and think it's an awesome function by Dirk! Following on from JD Long's answer, I would do this for user friendly reading:

# improved list of objects
.ls.objects <- function (pos = 1, pattern, order.by,
                        decreasing=FALSE, head=FALSE, n=5) {
    napply <- function(names, fn) sapply(names, function(x)
                                         fn(get(x, pos = pos)))
    names <- ls(pos = pos, pattern = pattern)
    obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1])
    obj.mode <- napply(names, mode)
    obj.type <- ifelse(is.na(obj.class), obj.mode, obj.class)
    obj.prettysize <- napply(names, function(x) {
                           format(utils::object.size(x), units = "auto") })
    obj.size <- napply(names, object.size)
    obj.dim <- t(napply(names, function(x)
                        as.numeric(dim(x))[1:2]))
    vec <- is.na(obj.dim)[, 1] & (obj.type != "function")
    obj.dim[vec, 1] <- napply(names, length)[vec]
    out <- data.frame(obj.type, obj.size, obj.prettysize, obj.dim)
    names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "PrettySize", "Length/Rows", "Columns")
    if (!missing(order.by))
        out <- out[order(out[[order.by]], decreasing=decreasing), ]
    if (head)
        out <- head(out, n)
    out
}

# shorthand
lsos <- function(..., n=10) {
    .ls.objects(..., order.by="Size", decreasing=TRUE, head=TRUE, n=n)
}

lsos()

Which results in something like the following:

                      Type   Size PrettySize Length/Rows Columns
pca.res                 PCA 790128   771.6 Kb          7      NA
DF               data.frame 271040   264.7 Kb        669      50
factor.AgeGender   factanal  12888    12.6 Kb         12      NA
dates            data.frame   9016     8.8 Kb        669       2
sd.                 numeric   3808     3.7 Kb         51      NA
napply             function   2256     2.2 Kb         NA      NA
lsos               function   1944     1.9 Kb         NA      NA
load               loadings   1768     1.7 Kb         12       2
ind.sup             integer    448  448 bytes        102      NA
x                 character     96   96 bytes          1      NA

NOTE: The main part I added was (again, adapted from JD's answer) :

obj.prettysize <- napply(names, function(x) {
                           print(object.size(x), units = "auto") })
  • can this function be added to dplyr or some other key package. – userJT Dec 22 '15 at 19:28
  • 1
    Worth noting that (at least with base-3.3.2) capture.output is not neccessary anymore, and obj.prettysize <- napply(names, function(x) {format(utils::object.size(x), units = "auto") }) produces clean output. In fact, not removing it produces unwanted quotes in the output, i.e. [1] "792.5 Mb" instead of 792.5 Mb. – Nutle Apr 27 '17 at 6:57
  • @Nutle Excellent, I've updated the code accordingly :) – Tony Breyal Jan 23 at 18:56
  • I'd also change obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1]) to obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) class(x)[1]) since class always return a vector of characters now (base-3.5.0). – DeltaIV Jun 14 at 15:28

I love Dirk's .ls.objects() script but I kept squinting to count characters in the size column. So I did some ugly hacks to make it present with pretty formatting for the size:

.ls.objects <- function (pos = 1, pattern, order.by,
                        decreasing=FALSE, head=FALSE, n=5) {
    napply <- function(names, fn) sapply(names, function(x)
                                         fn(get(x, pos = pos)))
    names <- ls(pos = pos, pattern = pattern)
    obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1])
    obj.mode <- napply(names, mode)
    obj.type <- ifelse(is.na(obj.class), obj.mode, obj.class)
    obj.size <- napply(names, object.size)
    obj.prettysize <- sapply(obj.size, function(r) prettyNum(r, big.mark = ",") )
    obj.dim <- t(napply(names, function(x)
                        as.numeric(dim(x))[1:2]))
    vec <- is.na(obj.dim)[, 1] & (obj.type != "function")
    obj.dim[vec, 1] <- napply(names, length)[vec]
    out <- data.frame(obj.type, obj.size,obj.prettysize, obj.dim)
    names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "PrettySize", "Rows", "Columns")
    if (!missing(order.by))
        out <- out[order(out[[order.by]], decreasing=decreasing), ]
        out <- out[c("Type", "PrettySize", "Rows", "Columns")]
        names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "Rows", "Columns")
    if (head)
        out <- head(out, n)
    out
}

I make aggressive use of the subset parameter with selection of only the required variables when passing dataframes to the data= argument of regression functions. It does result in some errors if I forget to add variables to both the formula and the select= vector, but it still saves a lot of time due to decreased copying of objects and reduces the memory footprint significantly. Say I have 4 million records with 110 variables (and I do.) Example:

# library(rms); library(Hmisc) for the cph,and rcs functions
Mayo.PrCr.rbc.mdl <- 
cph(formula = Surv(surv.yr, death) ~ age + Sex + nsmkr + rcs(Mayo, 4) + 
                                     rcs(PrCr.rat, 3) +  rbc.cat * Sex, 
     data = subset(set1HLI,  gdlab2 & HIVfinal == "Negative", 
                           select = c("surv.yr", "death", "PrCr.rat", "Mayo", 
                                      "age", "Sex", "nsmkr", "rbc.cat")
   )            )

By way of setting context and the strategy: the gdlab2 variable is a logical vector that was constructed for subjects in a dataset that had all normal or almost normal values for a bunch of laboratory tests and HIVfinal was a character vector that summarized preliminary and confirmatory testing for HIV.

That's a good trick.

One other suggestion is to use memory efficient objects wherever possible: for instance, use a matrix instead of a data.frame.

This doesn't really address memory management, but one important function that isn't widely known is memory.limit(). You can increase the default using this command, memory.limit(size=2500), where the size is in MB. As Dirk mentioned, you need to be using 64-bit in order to take real advantage of this.

  • 22
    Isn't this only applicable to Windows? – Christopher DuBois Sep 19 '09 at 11:51
  • 2
    > memory.limit() [1] Inf Warning message: 'memory.limit()' is Windows-specific – LJT Nov 1 '17 at 23:58

I quite like the improved objects function developed by Dirk. Much of the time though, a more basic output with the object name and size is sufficient for me. Here's a simpler function with a similar objective. Memory use can be ordered alphabetically or by size, can be limited to a certain number of objects, and can be ordered ascending or descending. Also, I often work with data that are 1GB+, so the function changes units accordingly.

showMemoryUse <- function(sort="size", decreasing=FALSE, limit) {

  objectList <- ls(parent.frame())

  oneKB <- 1024
  oneMB <- 1048576
  oneGB <- 1073741824

  memoryUse <- sapply(objectList, function(x) as.numeric(object.size(eval(parse(text=x)))))

  memListing <- sapply(memoryUse, function(size) {
        if (size >= oneGB) return(paste(round(size/oneGB,2), "GB"))
        else if (size >= oneMB) return(paste(round(size/oneMB,2), "MB"))
        else if (size >= oneKB) return(paste(round(size/oneKB,2), "kB"))
        else return(paste(size, "bytes"))
      })

  memListing <- data.frame(objectName=names(memListing),memorySize=memListing,row.names=NULL)

  if (sort=="alphabetical") memListing <- memListing[order(memListing$objectName,decreasing=decreasing),] 
  else memListing <- memListing[order(memoryUse,decreasing=decreasing),] #will run if sort not specified or "size"

  if(!missing(limit)) memListing <- memListing[1:limit,]

  print(memListing, row.names=FALSE)
  return(invisible(memListing))
}

And here is some example output:

> showMemoryUse(decreasing=TRUE, limit=5)
      objectName memorySize
       coherData  713.75 MB
 spec.pgram_mine  149.63 kB
       stoch.reg  145.88 kB
      describeBy    82.5 kB
      lmBandpass   68.41 kB

Unfortunately I did not have time to test it extensively but here is a memory tip that I have not seen before. For me the required memory was reduced with more than 50%. When you read stuff into R with for example read.csv they require a certain amount of memory. After this you can save them with save("Destinationfile",list=ls()) The next time you open R you can use load("Destinationfile") Now the memory usage might have decreased. It would be nice if anyone could confirm whether this produces similar results with a different dataset.

  • 4
    yes, I experienced the same. The memory usage drops even to 30% in my case. 1.5GB memory used, saved to .RData (~30MB). New session after loading .RData uses less than 500MB of memory. – f3lix Aug 2 '12 at 13:50
  • I tried with 2 datasets (100MB and 2.7GB) loaded into data.table using fread, then saved to .RData. The RData files were indeed about 70% smaller but after re-loading, the memory used were exactly the same. Was hoping this trick will reduce the memory footprint... am I missing something? – NoviceProg Mar 18 '15 at 13:46
  • @NoviceProg I don't think that you are missing something, but it is a trick, I guess it will not work for all situations. In my case the memory after re loading was actually reduced as described. – Dennis Jaheruddin Mar 19 '15 at 8:54
  • 5
    @NoviceProg A couple things. First, fread, following data.table's credo is probably more memory efficient in loading files than is read.csv. Second, the memory savings people are noting here primarily have to do with the memory size of the R process (which expands to hold objects and retracts when garbage collection takes place). However, garbage collection does not always release all of the RAM back to the OS. Stopping the R session and loading the item from where it has been stored will release as much RAM as is possible... but if the overhead was small to begin with ... no gain. – russellpierce Apr 8 '15 at 13:36

I never save an R workspace. I use import scripts and data scripts and output any especially large data objects that I don't want to recreate often to files. This way I always start with a fresh workspace and don't need to clean out large objects. That is a very nice function though.

up vote 25 down vote accepted

To further illustrate the common strategy of frequent restarts, we can use littler which allows us to run simple expressions directly from the command-line. Here is an example I sometimes use to time different BLAS for a simple crossprod.

 r -e'N<-3*10^3; M<-matrix(rnorm(N*N),ncol=N); print(system.time(crossprod(M)))'

Likewise,

 r -lMatrix -e'example(spMatrix)'

loads the Matrix package (via the --packages | -l switch) and runs the examples of the spMatrix function. As r always starts 'fresh', this method is also a good test during package development.

Last but not least r also work great for automated batch mode in scripts using the '#!/usr/bin/r' shebang-header. Rscript is an alternative where littler is unavailable (e.g. on Windows).

For both speed and memory purposes, when building a large data frame via some complex series of steps, I'll periodically flush it (the in-progress data set being built) to disk, appending to anything that came before, and then restart it. This way the intermediate steps are only working on smallish data frames (which is good as, e.g., rbind slows down considerably with larger objects). The entire data set can be read back in at the end of the process, when all the intermediate objects have been removed.

dfinal <- NULL
first <- TRUE
tempfile <- "dfinal_temp.csv"
for( i in bigloop ) {
    if( !i %% 10000 ) { 
        print( i, "; flushing to disk..." )
        write.table( dfinal, file=tempfile, append=!first, col.names=first )
        first <- FALSE
        dfinal <- NULL   # nuke it
    }

    # ... complex operations here that add data to 'dfinal' data frame  
}
print( "Loop done; flushing to disk and re-reading entire data set..." )
write.table( dfinal, file=tempfile, append=TRUE, col.names=FALSE )
dfinal <- read.table( tempfile )

Just to note that data.table package's tables() seems to be a pretty good replacement for Dirk's .ls.objects() custom function (detailed in earlier answers), although just for data.frames/tables and not e.g. matrices, arrays, lists.

  • this does not list any data.frames so it is not that great – userJT Dec 22 '15 at 19:20
  1. I'm fortunate and my large data sets are saved by the instrument in "chunks" (subsets) of roughly 100 MB (32bit binary). Thus I can do pre-processing steps (deleting uninformative parts, downsampling) sequentially before fusing the data set.

  2. Calling gc () "by hand" can help if the size of the data get close to available memory.

  3. Sometimes a different algorithm needs much less memory.
    Sometimes there's a trade off between vectorization and memory use.
    compare: split & lapply vs. a for loop.

  4. For the sake of fast & easy data analysis, I often work first with a small random subset (sample ()) of the data. Once the data analysis script/.Rnw is finished data analysis code and the complete data go to the calculation server for over night / over weekend / ... calculation.

The use of environments instead of lists to handle collections of objects which occupy a significant amount of working memory.

The reason: each time an element of a list structure is modified, the whole list is temporarily duplicated. This becomes an issue if the storage requirement of the list is about half the available working memory, because then data has to be swapped to the slow hard disk. Environments, on the other hand, aren't subject to this behaviour and they can be treated similar to lists.

Here is an example:

get.data <- function(x)
{
  # get some data based on x
  return(paste("data from",x))
}

collect.data <- function(i,x,env)
{
  # get some data
  data <- get.data(x[[i]])
  # store data into environment
  element.name <- paste("V",i,sep="")
  env[[element.name]] <- data
  return(NULL)  
}

better.list <- new.env()
filenames <- c("file1","file2","file3")
lapply(seq_along(filenames),collect.data,x=filenames,env=better.list)

# read/write access
print(better.list[["V1"]])
better.list[["V2"]] <- "testdata"
# number of list elements
length(ls(better.list))

In conjunction with structures such as big.matrix or data.table which allow for altering their content in-place, very efficient memory usage can be achieved.

  • 6
    This is no longer true: from Hadley's advanced R, "Changes to R 3.1.0 have made this use [of environments] substantially less important because modifying a list no longer makes a deep copy." – petrelharp Dec 31 '15 at 2:45

The llfunction in gData package can show the memory usage of each object as well.

gdata::ll(unit='MB')
  • 1
    If only it'd order by size by default... – krlmlr Jun 28 '14 at 18:21
  • Not on my system: R version 3.1.1 (2014-07-10), x86_64-pc-linux-gnu (64-bit), gdata_2.13.3, gtools_3.4.1. – krlmlr Jul 29 '14 at 11:40
  • You are right I test it once it was ordered by chance! – user1436187 Jul 30 '14 at 1:38
  • 1
    please modify the function to use Gb, Mb – userJT Jun 1 '15 at 15:37
  • please add support for Gb as units – userJT Dec 22 '15 at 19:27

If you really want to avoid the leaks, you should avoid creating any big objects in the global environment.

What I usually do is to have a function that does the job and returns NULL — all data is read and manipulated in this function or others that it calls.

With only 4GB of RAM (running Windows 10, so make that about 2 or more realistically 1GB) I've had to be real careful with the allocation.

I use data.table almost exclusively.

The 'fread' function allows you to subset information by field names on import; only import the fields that are actually needed to begin with. If you're using base R read, null the spurious columns immediately after import.

As 42- suggests, where ever possible I will then subset within the columns immediately after importing the information.

I frequently rm() objects from the environment as soon as they're no longer needed, e.g. on the next line after using them to subset something else, and call gc().

'fread' and 'fwrite' from data.table can be very fast by comparison with base R reads and writes.

As kpierce8 suggests, I almost always fwrite everything out of the environment and fread it back in, even with thousand / hundreds of thousands of tiny files to get through. This not only keeps the environment 'clean' and keeps the memory allocation low but, possibly due to the severe lack of RAM available, R has a propensity for frequently crashing on my computer; really frequently. Having the information backed up on the drive itself as the code progresses through various stages means I don't have to start right from the beginning if it crashes.

As of 2017, I think the fastest SSDs are running around a few GB per second through the M2 port. I have a really basic 50GB Kingston V300 (550MB/s) SSD that I use as my primary disk (has Windows and R on it). I keep all the bulk information on a cheap 500GB WD platter. I move the data sets to the SSD when I start working on them. This, combined with 'fread'ing and 'fwrite'ing everything has been working out great. I've tried using 'ff' but prefer the former. 4K read/write speeds can create issues with this though; backing up a quarter of a million 1k files (250MBs worth) from the SSD to the platter can take hours. As far as I'm aware, there isn't any R package available yet that can automatically optimise the 'chunkification' process; e.g. look at how much RAM a user has, test the read/write speeds of the RAM / all the drives connected and then suggest an optimal 'chunkification' protocol. This could produce some significant workflow improvements / resource optimisations; e.g. split it to ... MB for the ram -> split it to ... MB for the SSD -> split it to ... MB on the platter -> split it to ... MB on the tape. It could sample data sets beforehand to give it a more realistic gauge stick to work from.

A lot of the problems I've worked on in R involve forming combination and permutation pairs, triples etc, which only makes having limited RAM more of a limitation as they will often at least exponentially expand at some point. This has made me focus a lot of attention on the quality as opposed to quantity of information going into them to begin with, rather than trying to clean it up afterwards, and on the sequence of operations in preparing the information to begin with (starting with the simplest operation and increasing the complexity); e.g. subset, then merge / join, then form combinations / permutations etc.

There do seem to be some benefits to using base R read and write in some instances. For instance, the error detection within 'fread' is so good it can be difficult trying to get really messy information into R to begin with to clean it up. Base R also seems to be a lot easier if you're using Linux. Base R seems to work fine in Linux, Windows 10 uses ~20GB of disc space whereas Ubuntu only needs a few GB, the RAM needed with Ubuntu is slightly lower. But I've noticed large quantities of warnings and errors when installing third party packages in (L)Ubuntu. I wouldn't recommend drifting too far away from (L)Ubuntu or other stock distributions with Linux as you can loose so much overall compatibility it renders the process almost pointless (I think 'unity' is due to be cancelled in Ubuntu as of 2017). I realise this won't go down well with some Linux users but some of the custom distributions are borderline pointless beyond novelty (I've spent years using Linux alone).

Hopefully some of that might help others out.

This adds nothing to the above, but is written in the simple and heavily commented style that I like. It yields a table with the objects ordered in size , but without some of the detail given in the examples above:

#Find the objects       
MemoryObjects = ls()    
#Create an array
MemoryAssessmentTable=array(NA,dim=c(length(MemoryObjects),2))
#Name the columns
colnames(MemoryAssessmentTable)=c("object","bytes")
#Define the first column as the objects
MemoryAssessmentTable[,1]=MemoryObjects
#Define a function to determine size        
MemoryAssessmentFunction=function(x){object.size(get(x))}
#Apply the function to the objects
MemoryAssessmentTable[,2]=t(t(sapply(MemoryAssessmentTable[,1],MemoryAssessmentFunction)))
#Produce a table with the largest objects first
noquote(MemoryAssessmentTable[rev(order(as.numeric(MemoryAssessmentTable[,2]))),])

If you are working on Linux and want to use several processes and only have to do read operations on one or more large objects use makeForkCluster instead of a makePSOCKcluster. This also saves you the time sending the large object to the other processes.

I really appreciate some of the answers above, following @hadley and @Dirk that suggest closing R and issuing source and using command line I come up with a solution that worked very well for me. I had to deal with hundreds of mass spectras, each occupies around 20 Mb of memory so I used two R scripts, as follows:

First a wrapper:

#!/usr/bin/Rscript --vanilla --default-packages=utils

for(l in 1:length(fdir)) {

   for(k in 1:length(fds)) {
     system(paste("Rscript runConsensus.r", l, k))
   }
}

with this script I basically control what my main script do runConsensus.r, and I write the data answer for the output. With this, each time the wrapper calls the script it seems the R is reopened and the memory is freed.

Hope it helps.

As well as the more general memory management techniques given in the answers above, I always try to reduce the size of my objects as far as possible. For example, I work with very large but very sparse matrices, in other words matrices where most values are zero. Using the 'Matrix' package (capitalisation important) I was able to reduce my average object sizes from ~2GB to ~200MB as simply as:

my.matrix <- Matrix(my.matrix)

The Matrix package includes data formats that can be used exactly like a regular matrix (no need to change your other code) but are able to store sparse data much more efficiently, whether loaded into memory or saved to disk.

Additionally, the raw files I receive are in 'long' format where each data point has variables x, y, z, i. Much more efficient to transform the data into an x * y * z dimension array with only variable i.

Know your data and use a bit of common sense.

You also can get some benefit using knitr and puting your script in Rmd chuncks.

I usually divide the code in different chunks and select which one will save a checkpoint to cache or to a RDS file, and

Over there you can set a chunk to be saved to "cache", or you can decide to run or not a particular chunk. In this way, in a first run you can process only "part 1", another execution you can select only "part 2", etc.

Example:

part1
```{r corpus, warning=FALSE, cache=TRUE, message=FALSE, eval=TRUE}
corpusTw <- corpus(twitter)  # build the corpus
```
part2
```{r trigrams, warning=FALSE, cache=TRUE, message=FALSE, eval=FALSE}
dfmTw <- dfm(corpusTw, verbose=TRUE, removeTwitter=TRUE, ngrams=3)
```

As a side effect, this also could save you some headaches in terms of reproducibility :)

Based on @Dirk's and @Tony's answer I have made a slight update. The result was outputting [1] before the pretty size values, so I took out the capture.output which solved the problem:

.ls.objects <- function (pos = 1, pattern, order.by,
                     decreasing=FALSE, head=FALSE, n=5) {
napply <- function(names, fn) sapply(names, function(x)
    fn(get(x, pos = pos)))
names <- ls(pos = pos, pattern = pattern)
obj.class <- napply(names, function(x) as.character(class(x))[1])
obj.mode <- napply(names, mode)
obj.type <- ifelse(is.na(obj.class), obj.mode, obj.class)
obj.prettysize <- napply(names, function(x) {
    format(utils::object.size(x),  units = "auto") })
obj.size <- napply(names, utils::object.size)

obj.dim <- t(napply(names, function(x)
    as.numeric(dim(x))[1:2]))
vec <- is.na(obj.dim)[, 1] & (obj.type != "function")
obj.dim[vec, 1] <- napply(names, length)[vec]
out <- data.frame(obj.type, obj.size, obj.prettysize, obj.dim)
names(out) <- c("Type", "Size", "PrettySize", "Rows", "Columns")
if (!missing(order.by))
    out <- out[order(out[[order.by]], decreasing=decreasing), ]
if (head)
    out <- head(out, n)

return(out)
}

# shorthand
lsos <- function(..., n=10) {
    .ls.objects(..., order.by="Size", decreasing=TRUE, head=TRUE, n=n)
}

lsos()

This is a newer answer to this excellent old question. From Hadley's Advanced R:

install.packages("pryr")

library(pryr)

object_size(1:10)
## 88 B

object_size(mean)
## 832 B

object_size(mtcars)
## 6.74 kB

(http://adv-r.had.co.nz/memory.html)

Running

for (i in 1:10) 
    gc(reset = T)

from time to time also helps R to free unused but still not released memory.

  • What does the for loop do here? There's no i in the gc call. – Umaomamaomao Aug 25 '17 at 5:15
  • @qqq it is there just to avoid copy-paste gc(reset = T) nine times – Marcelo Ventura Sep 14 '17 at 9:15
  • 7
    But why would you run it 9 times? (curious, not critical) – Umaomamaomao Sep 14 '17 at 9:42

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